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WILLIAM CHALMERS COVERT. 



T HE 



\ First Presbyterian Church 



1833 - 1913 



5X 



A HISTORY OF THE OLDEST 
ORGANIZATION IN 

05" CHICAGO 

6% 



With Biographical Sketches of the Ministers and 
Extracts from the Choir Records 



BY 

PHILO ADAMS OTIS 

Member of the Committee on Music Since 1874 



With Illustrations 



FIRST EDITION 

Clayton F. Summy Co. 

Chicago, 1900 

SECOND AND REVISED EDITION 

Fleming H. Revell Co. 

Chicago, 1913 



COFyRIGHT, 1913 

By Philo a. Otis 



PRESS OF 

\Vm. H. Pool Ptg. & Bdg. Co. 

CHICAGO 



ILLUSTRATIONS AND PORTRAITS 

PAGE. 

First Presbyterian Church — "Brick Church," corner of 

Washington and Clark Streets (1849) 32 

First Presbyterian Church — Wabash Avenue and Congress 

Street (1866) 244 

First Presbyterian Church — Indiana Avenue and Twenty- 
First Street 62, 76, 82, 178, 282 

Interior 60 

Primary Department 302 

First Presbyterian Church — Grand Boulevard and Forty- 
First Street 278 

Fort Dearborn (1803-1812) 18 

Fort Dearborn (1816) 20 

Fort Dearborn Memorial, Tablet, Michigan Avenue and 

Rusn Street 16 

Railroad Mission, 309 West Thirty-Seventh Street . . . 306 
Seco'nd Presbyterian Church, Michigan Avenue and 

Twentieth Street 94, 116 

The Old Meeting House, Berhn Heights, Erie County, Ohio 208 

Third Presbyterian Church, West Washington Street (1870) 36 

Wabash Avenue M. E. Church, Corner of Harrison Street (1866) 40 

Rev. Edward Anderson 48, 98 

George F. Bacon 58 

Addison Ballard 1-^0 

Hans Balatka 220 

Rev. John Blatchford, D. D 26, 232 

Rev. Flavel Bascom, D. D 236 

Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D 72, 258 

Horace G. Bird 102 

Mrs. Willard S. Bracken 204 

William Beard 1"2 

Dudley Buck 216 

Rev. W. J. Chichester, D. D 260 

Edward C. Cleaver 226 

Rev. William C. Covert, D. D Frontispiece 

Rev. Harvey Curtis, D. D 240 

George W. Darrow 296 

Mrs. Christine N. Dreier 134 

Adolph W. Dohn 224 

Augustus G. Downs 210 

Clarence Eddy 68, 96 

Col. James M. Emery 306 

Oscar G. Erickson 190 

Samuel M. Fassett 226 

Mrs. Samuel M. Fassett 212 

(v) 



PAGE. 

Marshall Field 144 

Rev. Johh N. Freeman, D. D 272 

Marion Green 184 

Glenn Hall 120 

Dr. Robert C. Hamill 80 

Charles A. Havens 66 

John M. Hubbard 80 

Rev. Z. M. Humphrey, D. D 242, 246 

Mrs. Z. M. Humphrey 182 

Charles D. Irwin 86, 92, 108 

Mrs. Daniel A. Jones 138 

Jules G. Lumbard 224 

Mrs. "Cassie" Matteson 222 

John B. Miller 186 

Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D 248, 250 

Rev. John A. Morison, D. D 132, 264 

Rev. Charles M. Morton 304 

Francis S. Moore 136, 168 

Claudius B. Nelson 78 

Frederick R. Otis 130 

James Otis 42 

Joseph E. Otis 122 

Dr. Daniel K. Pearsons 194 

George W. Perkins 38 

Rev. Edward A. Pierce 50 

Rev. Jeremiah Porter, D. D 228 

Edouard Remenyi 90 

Alfred D. Shaw 126 

Henry M. Sherwood 124 

Miss Sarah Tillinghast 218 

Mrs. Clara G. Trimble 152 

The Choir (1896) 100 

The Choir (1899-1900) 110 

The Choir (Easter, 1912) 192 

The Choir (Christmas, 1912) 202 

Robert M. Wells 162 

Alfred Williams 128 

Philo a. Wilbor 84 

Caryl Young 154 

I am indebted to Mr. Lucius J. Otis and Mr. Frank T. Lamb for 
views of the edifice at Twenty-First Street and of the present home 
of Railroad Mission on Thirty-Seventh Street. Through the kindness 
of Mr. Henry W. Dudley I have obtained portraits of many of the 
old members of the Church. 

(vi) 



CONTENTS 



PAGE. 

Illustrations and Portraits v vi 

Contents " ^■^{_-^^ 

Prelude, First Edition (1900) 13 

Prelude, Second Edition (1913) 15 

Historical: 

Fort Dearborn 17-19 

Arrival of the Rev. Jeremiah Porter, B. B. . . . [ 20 

Four Religious Denominations in Chicago . . . . 21-23 

Organization of First Church and First Members . . ! 21 22 

First Meeting House 23* 24 

Dedication ] '95 

Incorporation of Society and First Board of Trustees . 26 
Purchase of Corner of Clark and Washington Streets; the 

"Wooden Church" '_ 99 

Dedication of the "Brick Church" ! ! 30 241 

Special Act of Legislature . . ' ^31 

Sale of "Brick Church" 31 32 

Purchase of Wabash Avenue Lot ' ' '35 

Dedication of New Edifice ' ' 37 

ConsoHdation (1871) with Calvary Presbyterian Church. 55, 56, 60 
Committee on Recommendation and Investigation . 285 287 
Last Services in Twenty-First Street Edifice ...."' 202 
Consolidation with Forty-First Street Church IQfi 200 

Officers (1913) .' ." . 288 

Building and Improvement Committee . . . . . 289 

Calvary Presbyterian Church: 

Organization and Early Members . . 43-46 

The Rev. F. W. Graves .'.'.' 46, 47 

The Rev. Edward Anderson ' 47' 49 

Purchase of Corner of Indiana Avenue and Twenty- 
Second Street 49 

The Rev. J. H. Trowbridge 49 50 

The Rev. Edward A. Pierce 50' 51 

The Rev. W. C. Dickinson ' '51 

The Rev. Daniel Lord, D. D ' ' 51^ 52 

New Edifice at Indiana Avenue and Twenty-First Street 5-^' 53 

The Great Fire (1871) ''54 

Union of First and Calvary Presbyterian Churches . . 55, 56 

Calvary Church Choir; Members 57-59 

The United Churches: 

New Organ and Dedication Concert 61-63 

Trial of the Rev. David Swing 63-65 

Pulpit and Choir 67-206 

The Choir Journals: 

1876, 1877, 1878 67 68 

1879, January 12, Mr. Eddy's (O.) First Service . . '. 68*, 69 

1880, August 8, Resignation of Dr. Mitchell . . . . 69* 70 

1881, December 6, Installation of Dr. Barrows . . ] 70-73 

(vii) 



PAGE. 

1882, November 5, Dr. McPherson begins Ministry (Second 
Church) "... 73, 74 

1883, February 18, Sunday Evening Services begin at 
Central Music Hall 74, 75 

Fiftieth Anniversary 75, 76 

1884, 1885, 1886 77-82 

1887, 1888, 1889, 1890 82-88 

1891, Mav 17, New Building (Railroad Chapel) at 3825 
South Dearborn Street, Dedicated 88 

1892, June 19, Second Presbyterian Church celebrates 
Fiftieth Anniversary 90 

1893, April 26, Memorial Service for Dr. Mitchell . . 91 

1894, May 27, Resignation of the Rev. Charles M. Morton 
(Railroad Chapel) 94 

1895, May 19, Resignation of Mr. Eddy 96 

November 24, Resignation of Dr. Barrows . . 99 

1896, February 16, Dr. Barrows' Last Service ... 100 

1897, October 20, Installation of Dr. Chichester ... 105 
1898 107-110 

1899, Mav 9, Resignation of Dr. McPherson (Second 
Church ) 113 

1900, 1901 116-122 

1902, June 3, Death of Dr. Barrows at Oberlin, Ohio. . 124 

1903, March 23, Death of Dr. Chichester at Atlanta, Ga. 127 

1904, April 3, Easter, First Service of Dr. Morison . 133 

April 28, Installation 134 

November 23, Memorial Service (former ministers). 135-136 

1905, February 7, Organization Fort Dearborn Guild . 138 

1906, October 21, Unveiling of Blatchford Tablet . . 149 

1907, May 10, Fiftieth Anniversary of Railroad Chapel . 156 
Tune 3, Resignation of the Rev. W. J. McCaughan, 

(third Church) 156 

1908, December 6-10, Diamond Jubilee Exercises . 164-167 

1909, June 3, Installation of Dr. John T. Stone (Fourth 
Church) 172 

December 12, Banquet of Presbyterian Social Union 
in First Church. Paper by Mr. Philo A. Otis, 

"Church and Choir of Yesterday." .... 175 

1910, June 22, Resignation of Dr. Morison .... 179 

July 3, Last Service of Dr. Morison 179 

October 16, Dr. Freeman, Minister in Charge . . 181 

1911 183-191 

1912, June 19, Special Meeting of Church and Society, 

(Union with Forty-First Street Church) .... 196 

December 2, Annual Meeting of Church and So- 
ciety; Report of Joint Committee on Union of 

Churches, adopted 200 

December 29, Final Service (Christmas) in Twenty- 
First Street Edifice 201-203 

Tribute to Principal Members of Choir 205, 206 

A Ch.\pter on Choirs: 

The Village Choir 207,208 

Early Music in First Church 209 

Choir Leaders and Members 210 

Henry \V. Greatorex and His Music 212-214 

(viii) 



228-231 
232-236 
237-239 
240-242 
243-246 
247-252 
253-259 
260-264 
265-271 
272-275 
276-277 



PAGE. 

Letter From the Rev. Edward Greatorex 213 

Article by N. J. Corey 214 

First Organ in Chicago [ 215 

St. James' Episcopal Church and Dudley Buck . . . 216 

Organs in Chicago 216-218 

Vacation Days in Hartford; its musicians 217 

Early Organists and Choir Singers 218-223 

Members of the First Church Choir prior to 1871 . . . 224 

Leaders of the Choir prior to 1857, First Church . . 225, 226 
Members of the Choir Prior to 1857, First Church . 226^ 227 
Lives of the Ministers of the First Church: 
The Rev. Jeremiah Porter, D. D., Founder 
The Rev. John Blatchford, D. D., First Minister . 
The Rev. Flavel Bascom, D. D., Second Minister 
The Rev. Harvey Curtis, D. D., Third Minister . 
The Rev. Z. M. Humphrey, D. D., Fourth Minister 
The Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., Fifth Minister . 
The Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D., Sixth Minister 
The Rev. W. J. Chichester, D. D., Seventh Minister 
The Rev. John A. Morison, D. D., Eighth Minister 
The Rev. John N. Freeman, D. D., Minister in Charge 
Officers of the First Church (1900 and 1912) . . 

The Forty-First Street Presbyterian Church 

15, 181, 196, 200, 202 

History and Organization 275-279 

Early Members 278 

Choir QgO 

Officers (1912) '.'.'. 281 

ConsoHdation with First Church 285, 287 

The Consolidated First and Forty-First Street Presby- 
terian Churches 282-288 

Officers (1913) 288-289 

The Rev. WiUiam C. Covert, D. D. Installation as Ninth 

Minister 289 

Life 291-293 

The Rev. John N. Freeman, D. D. Installation as Asso- 
ciate Minister 289 

Building and Improvement Committee .... 289, 293 
The First Church Sunday-school, Organization and 

History 22-294 

Superintendents and Teachers 

Primary Department 

The Railroad Mission, Organization and History 

Edifices 

Superindendents and Officers (1913) .... 

Postlude 

Addenda 

General Index 

Choir Index 



295 
302 


-301 
-303 




304 
304 
305 




306 




307 




311 


317 


-320 



Abbreviations used in this work: Soprano (S.), Alto (A.), Tenor 
(T.), Bass (B.), Organist (O.). 

(ix) 



TO 

A. S. O, 



PRELUDE TO THE FIRST EDITION (1900) 

In presenting a history of the First Presbyterian Church, 
I shall consider: 

1. The history of the Church from its foundation in 
1833 to the consolidation with the Calvary Presbyterian 
Church in 1871; 

2. The history of the Calvary Presbyterian Church 
from its foundation in 1859 to the consolidation with the 
First Church in 1871; 

3. The period from the consolidation of the two 
Churches in 1871 to the present date, 1900. 

In preparing this volume, I have consulted the records 
of the Session of the First Church commencing May 30, 
1833; the files of newspapers in the Historical Society and 
Public Library; Captain A. T. Andreas' History of Chicago; the 
Historical Sketch of the Rev. Zephaniah Moore Humphrey , D. D. 
(1867) and the Historical Sermons of the Rev. Arthur Mitchell, 
D. D. (1878) and the Rev. John Henry Barrows, D. D. (1883). 

In January, 1875, I became especially interested in the 
musical part of the service, and at that time started a semi- 
official Choir Journal, in which were recorded every Sunday 
the names of members of the Choir present, titles of 
Choir and organ selections, name of the officiating Minister, 
occasionally noting text or subject of sermon, as well as im- 
portant pulpit announcements. Funeral services of mem- 
bers of the Church and Congregation, in which the Minister 
and Choir have taken part are also noted therein. 

This book, therefore, is largely devoted to the history 
of music in this Church as a part of its service; and, as to 
my knowledge, there exists no other work covering this sub- 
ject, I have attempted to present a number of facts connect- 
ed with Church music with which I have become acquainted 
during my investigations, and which seem to me to deserve 
an authentic record in connection with a history of Church 
life in Chicago. 

All the former Ministers of the First Church, excepting 
the Rev. John Henry Barrows, D. D., have passed away. 
The Rev. William John Chichester, D. D., the seventh and 
present Minister, began his labors October 3, 1897, The 



14 PRELUDE TO THE FIRST EDITION 

Rev. Edward Anderson is the only surviving Minister of 
Calvary Church, the Rev. Daniel Lord, D. D., having been 
called to his rest, September 10, 1899. 

My thanks are due to many friends who have assisted in 
the preparation of this work, and especially to the following: 

Mr. Eliphalet W. Blatchford, for the article on the life of 
his father, the Rev. John Blatchford, D. D., the first Minister; 
Mr. George H. Fergus, author of "Fergus' Historical Series" 
and "Early Illinois"; Mr. Henry Eckford Seelye, member of 
the Session (1856-72), and the Rev. William Willis Clark, 
for data pertaining to the early history of the Church and 
its members; and to Mrs. William Saltonstall of Plainfield, 
N. J., Mrs. Margarette Clarkson Hoard of Ogdensburg, N. Y., 
Mrs. Oliver Kepler Johnson, Mr. Edward C. Cleaver, and Mr. 
Charles O. Bostwick of Chicago, for information pertaining 
to the Choirs of earlier days. 

I am under great obligations to Mr. Edward Duncan 
Jardine of New York City, Mr. George S. Hutchings of 
Boston, Mr. George N. Andrews of Oakland, Cal., Henry 
Pilcher's Sons of Louisville, Ky,, Mr. W. A, Johnson of 
Westfield, Mass., the late Mr. Charles Rollin Larrabee and 
Mr. Charles David Irwin of Chicago, for their aid in col- 
lecting data regarding the organs of Chicago, and to many 
other kind friends for valuable suggestions. 

If, after the manner of "Old Mortality" who went about 
carving anew the head lines on the tombstones of the Cov- 
enanters, I have been able to place in clearer light any facts 
regarding those who, in the past, have given so much time 
and labor to the work of building up this Church, then my 
task is done. We owe much to the founder and the Min- 
isters; as much, and perhaps more, to the faithful men and 
women by whose devotion, exertion and sacrifice the Church 
has been maintained to this day; and as we pass from pulpit 
to Congregation, it is but fitting to include the influence of 
the Choir loft. P. A. O. 

Since the above was written (1900) Dr. Barrows, Dr. Chichester, 
Mr. Henry Eckford Seelye, Mrs. Margarette Clarkson Hoard, Mr. 
Edward C. Cleaver, Mr. George S. Hutchings and Mr. W. A. Johnson 
have passed away. 

Mr. George H. Fergus died November 24, 1911, in Chicago. 



PRELUDE TO THE SECOND EDITION 

It has been said, "the greatest pleasure in life is resorting 
in old age to the studies of youth," I can truly say that a 
lapse of forty years has not diminished my interest in work- 
ing with the historic First Presbyterian Church of Chicago. 
My father began his Church work in 1859. I began mine in 
1868. I have now arrived at "the parting of the ways," 
and it is with sad thoughts that I stand on the threshold of 
the old Church at Indiana avenue and Twenty-first street, 
whose doors I helped to open in 1872, now closed forever. 

With this edition, the history of the Church is brought 
down to the present time, December 31, 1912, in order to 
include the consolidation of the First with the Forty-first 
Street Presbyterian Church. 

The Directors of the World's Fair (1893) placed these 
words, from the Gospel of St. John, over the peristyle, "Ye 
Shall Know the Truth and the Truth Shall Make you Free." 
Though a difficult task, it has been a keen delight to this 
editor to search out the exact truth, as to events and dates, 
and the names of men and women as they will appear in 
these pages. One purpose I have kept steadily in view — to 
gather all the data possible about organists and Choir singers 
of early days in Chicago, that these faithful men and women 
may not pass out of mind, "unwept and unsung." 

The history of the First Church is told in the biogra- 
phies of the people who made it. Among the names, en- 
rolled as members, will be found those of men and women 
who have stood for the highest and best in the religious, 
commercial, and social life of Chicago. 

On Wednesday evening, November 23, 1904, a service 
in memory of the former Ministers was held in the lecture 
room of this Church. The addresses delivered on the occa- 
sion were afterward published by the Session, thus enabling 
me to rewrite their lives and to add data that will be of 
interest. 

It has been my pleasure to see in the pulpit of our 
Church all of its Ministers save two — Blatchford and Curtis. 
These men had passed away long before I became associated 
with the Society. It was my great privilege to converse 



16 PRELUDE TO THE SECOND EDITION 

with the founder, Jeremiah Porter, at the Jubilee in 1883, 
and to hear him speak on his early religious experiences in 
Chicago. 

James Anthony Froude said of Thomas Carlyle: "It 
was his special gift to bring dead things and dead people 
back to life ; to make the past once more the present ; to show 
us men and women on the mortal stage as real flesh and 
blood creatures." I wish it were possible to show a living, 
moving picture of life in the First Church since the days of 
Fort Dearborn. But I can only give the few bare outlines 
I have gathered from the lips of old members, from the rec- 
ords of the Session and from my own, which began in 1865. 

Chicago, July 30, 1913. 

P. A. O. 




MEMORIAL TABLET oX THE SITE 



)RT DEARBoRX. 



"My heart is inditing a good matter." — {Psalm xlv: /.) 

HISTORICAL 

Little remains today of early Chicago. The few his- 
toric buildings which escaped (1856-57) the crusade for 
public improvement and extension of business were con- 
sumed in the conflagration of 1871. While Fort Dearborn 
lasted, it was, as some one has well said, "the connecting link 
between us and the Indians and the wilderness." The 
block-house held out until 1857. Then it had to go, "and 
the place thereof shall know it no more," but for a marble 
tablet attached to the north wall of the building at the inter- 
section of Michigan avenue and River street, facing Rush 
street bridge. Let us stop and read, for our ecclesiastical 
records start with Fort Dearborn: 

"This building occupies the site of old Fort Dearborn, which ex- 
tended a little across Mich. Ave., and somewhat into the river as 
it now is. The fort was built in 1803-4, forming our outmost 
defense. 

By order of Gen. Hull it was evacuated Aug. 15, 1812, after 
its stores and provisions had been distributed among the Indians. 

Very soon after, the Indians attacked and massacred about 
fifty of the troops and a number of citizens, including women and 
children, and next day burned the fort. 

In 1816 it was rebuilt, but after the Blackhawk war it went 
into gradual disuse, and in May, 1837, was abandoned by the army, 
but was occupied by various government officers till 1857, when it 
was torn down, excepting a single building which stood upon this 
site till the great fire of Oct. 9, 1871. 

At the suggestion of the Chicago Historical Society this tablet 
was erected by W. M. Hoyt. 

Nov., 1880." 

Why was this particular point on Lake Michigan se- 
lected by our government as a position of "outmost defense"? 
Why was the fort placed at the mouth of the Chicago river, 
the least important of all the rivers flowing into the lake, an 
insignificant stream, with no harbor facilities, with few 
natural advantages? And yet, on the site of this fort, has 
arisen one of the great cities of the world. 

A few historical data may here be permitted, though 
a full presentation of the subject would be outside the scope 
of the present work. One hundred years ago the great high- 



IS .-1 HISTORY OF THE 

way from the Canadas to the lower Mississippi was by Lake 
Michigan to the Chicago river, thence by the Illinois river 

iinto the "Father of Waters." This was the route of Mar- 
quette in 1675, of La Salle in 1679, and of the Jesuit fathers 
in the eighteenth century on their missionary journeys from 
i Quebec and Montreal. The agents of the trading companies 
having stations throughout the northwest and along the 
great lakes could send their goods to the Mississippi only by 
means of the Chicago Portage. 

Fort Dearborn was built for the protection of the trading 
interests, to counteract the influence of the British on the 
Indian tribes scattered along the lake, and to control the 
gateway to the Mississippi. 

On August 17, 1803, a company of United States sol- 
diers, under the command of Captain John Whistler,^ arrived 
at the Chicago river, and, during that summer and autumn, 
built what has since been known as the first Fort Dearborn, 
named after General Henry Dearborn, at that time Secre- 
tary of war. The fort was destroyed at the time of the mas- 
sacre in 1812, but was rebuilt in 1816 on the same spot, 
after the plan adopted by the war department for most of 
its frontier posts, and consisted of quarters for the officers, 
barracks for the soldiers, magazine and provision storehouse 
and a block-house at the southwest corner, which served not 
only as a means of defense, but as a tower from which a view 
could be had of the surrounding territory. The officers' 
quarters were on the west side, and the soldiers' on the east 
side. The entire premises covered an acre or more of ground 
and were enclosed by a stockade, fourteen feet in height, 
made of pieces of timber driven into the ground and firmly 
bound together. It had two gates, one on the north and the 
other on the south side. The land to the south of the fort, 
reaching as far as Madison street, was enclosed with a fence, 
and for a long time was known as "Fort Dearborn Reserva- 
tion."- Dearborn Park, now occupied by the Public Li- 

' James McNeill Whistler, the artist, grandson of Captain John Whistler, said to 
a Chicago visitor. "Chicago, dear me, what a wonderful place. I really ought to visit 
it some day, for, you know, my grandfather founded the place and my uncle was the 
last Commander of I-'ort Dearborn." "Life of Whistler" by E. R. and J. Pennell (1908). 

' "Historical Sermon"; Rev. Abbott E- Kittredge. D. D., July 2, 1876. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 19 

brary, was a part of this reservation, and the land now 
bounded by Wabash and Michigan avenues was laid out as 
a military garden and graveyard. 

Mr. Addison Ballard, who had been identified with the 
First Presbyterian Church for at least forty years, writes of 
Fort Dearborn as he first saw it : 

"Chicago, February, 7, 1899. 
"In reply to your letter asking for my recollections of Fort Dear- 
born, 1 will say that I came to Chicago first in April, 1843, a wet 
spring, mud everywhere. Fort Dearborn stood on the highest and 
driest spot that I could see or find, and was located at about the 
junction of what is now Michigan avenue and River street. At that 
time the land was not subdivided, as it was when I came to Chicago 
to live in 1852. The block-house was the distinctive feature of the 
fort; it remained long after the other buildings had disappeared. 
The stockade was still standing in 1843. It ran along the west line 
of Michigan avenue to the present alley between Michigan avenue 
and River street, thence along the line of this alley to River street. 
The opening of River street may have removed the stockade from the 
north boundary of the fort prior to the year 1852. The stockade 
was made of puncheons^ four to six inches thick, driven into the 
ground. The lighthouse stood on the bank of the river just west of 
the south end of Rush street bridge, as it now is. 

"In 1856 John S. Wright, a manufacturer and dealer in agri- 
cultural machinery, bought the block-house and all that remained 
of the stockade, removing it in 1857 to his new factory on the north 
branch of the river, and manufacturing the old timber into furniture 
as souvenirs for himself and friends. The old logs were native oak, 
and all well seasoned. At that time (1856) I was manufacturing 
sash, blinds and doors at my factory, corner of Market and Congress 
streets. Mr. Wright wished me to saw up the logs into lumber, but 
not having machinery adapted to such work, I could not take the 
order. So he did not remove the block-house and stockade until 
1857, when he procured the necessary machinery." 

Chicago in 1833 consisted of a collection of log houses, 
or huts, rather, built by the traders and settlers on both sides 
of the river for a mile or so from its mouth. The only frame 
buildings were those occupied by the stores, of which there 
were three, standing about half a mile back from the lake. 

In the spring of 1833, the Indian War having termi- 
nated by the surrender of Blackhawk to General Scott,- the 

1 The halves of a spht log, with the faces smoothed with an adze or ax, are called 
puncheons. 

2 My grandfather, Deacon Philo Adams of Milan, Erie County, Ohio, came to 
Chicago, April 27, 1821, in charge of two vessels, "Lady of the Lake" and "Cincin- 



20 .4 HISTORY OF THE 

troops at Fort Dearborn were ordered elsewhere. They were 
to be relieved by two companies, then at Fort Brady, Sault 
Ste. Marie, ^Michigan Territory, under the command of Major 
John Fowle,^ and Brevet-Major de Lafayette Wilcox. ^ The 
Rev. Jeremiah Porter, who had been at the Sault since 1831 
doing missionary work and preaching to the men in the fort, 
was invited by Major Fowle to accompany the expedition to 
! Fort Dearborn. He decided to go, as he had been requested 
, by the Missionary Society to explore the shores of Lake 
Michigan, at that time almost an unknown region, and see 
if there were any settlements where the preaching of the 
j Gospel would be received. The trip from Fort Brady "was 
then," says Dr. Mitchell, "almost an ocean voyage," taking 
seven days to come from Mackinac. The little schooner, 
"the 'Mayflower' of our history," at last arrived off Chicago 
on Sunday morning, May 12, 1833, only to pass another 
dreary day waiting for the boisterous waves to subside. On 
Monday, the 13th, the lake having calmed sufficiently for 
the vessel to enter the river, Major Fowle landed his troops 
and passengers. 

On the following Sunday, May 19, the Rev. Jeremiah 
Porter held the first religious service in the history of the 
Church in the carpenter shop of Fort Dearborn, preaching 
from the words of the Carpenter of Nazareth: "Herein is my 
Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit; so shall ye be my 
disciples." (St. John xv: 8.) 

In the afternoon, Mr. Porter preached in "Father" Walker's 
cabin; at six o'clock, he held a prayer meeting at the fort, and 
later in the evening, attended another service at "Father" 
Walker's. Dr. Mitchell, in his "Historical Sermon," (1878) 

nati," loaded with stores for Fort Dearborn. In 1832 he came again with a drove 
of cattle for the supply of Gen. Scott's army. He left Milan, May 10, delivered the 
cattle June 20. and arrived home July 1. The diarj' he kept on this trip is now in 
the possession of my cousin, the Rev. Clair S. Adams of Decatur, 111. When a lad, I 
often heard my grandfather speak of General Scott and Fort Dearborn. He told me 
that the Indians called this place "Chi-Ca-Guh," the last syllable spoken as a gut- 
tural and with a strong accent. My great-grandfather, Daniel Adams, was one of 
General Stark's Green Mountain Boys, and was present at the surrender of Fort Ti- 
conderoga. Deacon Philo Adams was bom December 12, 1786, and died July 15, 1864. 

' Major John Fowle was killed April 25, 1838. by a steamboat explosion on the 
Ohio River. 

' Major Wilcox distinguished himself in the war of 1812 and died at Palatka, 
Fla.. January 3. 1842. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 21 

said of "Father" Walker: "He was an aged Methodist ^Minister 
who lived in a log cabin on the west side of the river, near 
the north branch, and preached there on the Sabbath." 

In 1833, four religious denominations were represented 
in Chicago: CathoHc, Presbyterian, Methodist, and Baptist. 

1. Roman Catholic. "In a large and true sense," 
said Dr. Barrows, "the precedency in the evangelization, not 
only of Chicago, but of the whole region from the St. Law- 
rence to the Mississippi, belongs to the Roman Catholic 
Church. In the seventeenth century, the Jesuit Fathers had 
a mission house near our city."^ On May 1, 1833, the Rev. 
Jean Marie Irenaeus St. Cyr, a French Priest, commissioned 
by Bishop Rosati of St. Louis, arrived in Chicago, and on 
May 5 celebrated his first Mass. These early services by 
Father St. Cyr were largely of a mission character until St. 
Mary's Chapel was completed. In a letter written from St. 
Louis, dated February 20, 1875, to Mr. H. H. Hurlbut,^ 
Father St. Cyr said: 

"I commenced the Church in the beginning of September, 183:3, 
and the last week of October of the same year I said the first Mass 
in it for the Catholic Indians, 300 in number, who had come to Chi- 
cago for their annuities, from South Bend. They cleaned and swept 
the Church for, the carpenter, Deodat Taylor, had just finished 
his work the day before. But the Church was not plastered; it was 
only in March, 1834, that the plastering was done and the pews ready, 
and from the first of April of the same year we had religious services, 
morning and evening." 

2. Presbyterian. The second entry in volume I. of 
the Sessional records of the First Presbyterian Church reads : 

"June 26. The Church was organized by adopting the Covenant 
and Articles of Faith in the Presbytery of Detroit. 

"The following persons were received at the formation of the 
Church, viz:" 

in garrison. 
Capt. D. Wilcox. Richard Burtis. 

Mrs. S. G. Wilcox. Benjamin Briscor. 

Lieut. L. T. Jameson. Ebenezer Ford. 

Sergt. J. Adams. John GrEv. 

Mrs. H. Adams. Isaac Ingraham. 

Sergt. William C. Cole. William Johnson. 

Mrs. Julia Cole. David Lake. 

Mrs. Ruth Ward. James Murray. 

1 "Historical Sermon," John Henry Barrows, June, 1883. 

2 Hurlbut's "Chicago Antiquities." 



22 A HISTORY OF THE 



CHICAGO. 



Mr. John Wright. Mrs. Elizabeth Brown. 
" RuFus Brown. " Mary Taylor. 

" John S. Wright. " Clark. 

" Philo Carpenter. " Cynthia Brown. 

" Jonathan H. Poor. 

J The author does not claim that the first religious services 

] in Chicago were conducted by the First Church, but that the 
I first organized, regularly constituted religious Society, in a 
word, the oldest organization in Chicago, is the First Presby- 
terian Church. The Manual (1856) contains a brief history 
of the First Church, prepared by Dr. Curtis, in which he said 
of its organization, June 26, 1833: 
\ "But, hitherto, no Church organization had been effected by 

any denomination of Christians." 

I The First Church really dates from a prayer meeting 

and Sunday-school, started in August, 1832, by Mr. Philo 
Carpenter, assisted by "a Methodist brother," and an officer 
from the garrison, in an unfinished building, owned by Mark 
Beaubien. These services continued, with a few interrup- 
tions, through the winter of 1832-33 and were held in differ- 
ent places. Finally, they found a home in "Father" Walker's 
cabin. "There Jeremiah Porter found the school and soon 
had an organized Church."^ 

3. Methodist. In 1828, the Rev. Jesse Walker, a 
Methodist INIinister, afterward known as "Father" Walker, 
came to Chicago and held a number of religious services. 
He was followed by the Rev. S. R. Beggs in 1831. " Father" 
Walker came again in 1832, and was here in 1833, when Jere- 
miah Porter landed with the troops at Fort Dearborn. These 
services by the Methodists were in the nature of a mission 
and it is so stated in the records of the First M. E. Church. 
Their first quarterly Conference was held in August, 1833, and 
this may be considered the organization of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church of Chicago, incorporated November 20, 
1835. The name of this Society was changed February 13, 
1865, by a special act of legislature, to the First Methodist 
Episcopal Church of Chicago. 

' From an address by Mr. Philo Carpenter to the I'irst Presbyterian Church Sun- 
day-school (1S68). See E. G. Mason's "Chicago and Early Illinois." page 106. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 23 

4. Baptist. The Rev. Ira McCoy, a Baptist Minister, 
was the first to preach the Gospel in Chicago, October 9, 
1825; but the First Baptist Church was not organized until 
October 19, 1833. 

At the Jubilee Celebration (1883) of the First Church, 
the name of Miss Eliza Chappel, whom he had known in 
Mackinac as a teacher, was added to the above list of original 
members of the First Church, "on the authority and by the 
request of the Rev. Jeremiah Porter."' The first public 
school in Chicago was organized in the meeting house of the 
First Presbyterian Church and Miss Chappel was the first 
teacher in this school. She was married to the Rev. Mr. 
Porter, June 16, 1834, in Rochester, N. Y. 

The membership of the Church increased within a few 
months from twenty-six to fifty-seven, and to accommodate 
soldiers and citizens, preaching services were held for a time 
both in the fort and at "Father" Walker's cabin on Wolf Point. 
June 11, 1833, a committee had been appointed to solicit 
subscriptions for the construction of a meeting house, Mr. 
Porter generously suggesting that any money subscribed to- 
ward his support might be applied to the building fund. In 
the meantime, the Home Missionary Society made proper 
provision for Mr. Porter. 

The erection of the first house of worship was quite an 
event in the little settlement. "Nearly all the inhabitants 
aided in the construction of this building, and the under- 
taking was so stupendous that every shoulder was needed 
at the wheel. "^ 

The meeting house, built by Mr. Joseph Meeker,^ "stood 
out in the open field, without any fence around it, on what 
is now the alley of the lot at the southwest corner of Lake 
and Clark streets," on the south twenty-five feet of Tot One in 
Block Thirty-four in the Original Town of Chicago. The Chicago 



1 "Historical Sermon," Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D., 1S83, page 16. 

2 Hurlbut's "Chicago Antiquities," page 615. 

' Mr. Joseph Meeker was born in Elizabethtown, N. J., September 29, 1805; came 
to Chicago early in 1833; was received into the membership of this Church, September 
8, 1833; librarian in the first formal organization of the Sunday-school, March 16, 1835; 
one of the founders of the Calvary Presbyterian Church, June 20, 1859; died in Chi- 
cago, January 4, 1872. I was a member of his Sunday-school class at the South Con- 
gregational Church in 1857. and often heard him speak of his early life in Chicago. 



24 A HISTORY OF THE 

Daily Democrat (1834) says: "The First Presbyterian 

Church has purchased lot 1 in block 34." The books of the 

Title Guarantee and Trust Co. do not, however, show any 

record of such a purchase. We can only infer that for the 

' two years or more the Society was in possession of this lot, 

' it must have been by permission of the Trustees of the 111- 

« inois and Michigan Canal, who held title to the land. The 

lot was purchased at the Canal sale, June, 1836, more than 

two years after the meeting house was built, by James Cur- 

. tiss. Secretary of the Illinois Hotel Co. The hotel scheme 

collapsed in the panic of 1835-37, and thus the Church was 

providentially permitted to continue in possession another 

year until a new location was procured farther south on 

Clark street, below Washington.^ 

I It was a frame structure of the plainest character, about 

forty feet in length and twenty-five in width, with plastered 

walls and bare puncheon floors. The cost was $600. The 

seating arrangements consisted of benches made of ordinary 

pine boards, and would accommodate about two hundred 

people. The settlers and the troops from the garrison "filled 

the building comfortably every Sunday." In the spring 

months, when the water in the ditch in front of the Church 

made it almost inaccessible, the benches taken from the 

i Church were the ordinary means for bridging the slough. 

"Several of the members of the Church," says Dr. 
j\Iitchell,- "lived on the West Side, where there were then 
three houses, but one of those houses, though only 20 x 14, 
accommodated that winter seventeen persons. For them it 
was quite a circumstance to reach the Church. The river 
had to be crossed by a sort of floating bridge, near what is 
now Randolph street, and they must then go skipping from 
one log to another, across the swamps and bogs of the muddy 
prairies. Sometimes they were sadly bemired on the way, 

' The Rev. A. D. Field, in speaking of the early Churches of Chicago, says: "There 
was this year [1836] a small Catholic chapel, a block south of the Tremont House, and 
the Presbyterians had a house about 20x30 seated with school benches, which served 
as Church and schoolhouse, situated on Clark street between Randolph and Lake 
streets, where the present writer received many of the elements of an education, and 
I often sat with aching bones through the long Sabbath services." ("Chicago and Her 
, Churches." PhiUips, 1867.) 

' "Historical Sermon," by Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., page 7. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 25 

and more than once ladies had to be picked up by strong 
arms and lifted across the black and treacherous holes." 

Such was "Chicago's first built Protestant meeting 
house, commonly called 'the Lord's House,' and a useful 
building it was to the first settlers." It was dedicated 
January 4, 1834/ Mr. Porter preaching a sermon from the 
text: "Yea, the sparrow hath found a house, and the swal- 
low a nest for herself, where she may lay her young; even 
Thine altars, O Lord of hosts, my King and my God." 
(Psalm Ixxxiv: 3.) Mr. Porter was assisted in the dedica- 
tory services by the Rev. A. B. Freeman, Minister of the 
First Baptist Church, who offered the consecration prayer. 

From 1833 to 1835, the membership increased to about 
one hundred, and, as the Church was then self-supporting, 
Mr. Porter felt justified in accepting a call in the autumn 
of 1835 to the Main Street Presbyterian Church, of Peoria, 111., 
"a place which had been settled some fourteen years earlier 
than Chicago." 

Mr. Porter was very reluctant to sever his relations 
with the work he had founded in Chicago, and did not go, 
as he wrote Dr. Mitchell many years later, without an ear- 
nest effort to find in his successor, "the best Minister in the 
land." While a delegate to the General Assembly at Pitts- 
burgh in May, 1835, Mr. Porter was in hopes of finding some 
one there who would believe in the possibilities of a great 
city on the banks of Lake Michigan. The Rev. Edward 
Humphrey, D. D., of Louisville, Ky., brother of the Rev. Z. 
M. Humphrey, D. D.; the Rev. E. N. Kirk, D. D., of Albany; 
the Rev. J. W. Adams, D. D., of Syracuse; the Rev. Joel 
Hawes, D. D., of Hartford, and the Rev. Derrick Lansing, 
D. D., of Auburn, "were besieged in vain." There was no 
great desire on the part of any of these men to leave their 
comfortable homes in the East for pioneer life in a place 
which was generally supposed to be "in a great swamp back 
of Lake Michigan." 

1 The thermometer stood at fifteen degrees below zero at noon. "The building was 
used for a schoolhouse, public meetings, lyceums and concerts. Being the largest 
room in the village, it was not only used as a Church, but as a sort of Town Hall. The 
first concert in Chicago was held in this building in December, 1835, the house filled, 
with tickets at 50 cents. It was in this meeting house that the first Episcopal serv- 
ice was held in Chicago." (Chicago Magazine, June 15, 1857.) 



26 A HISTORY OF THE 

The people had already adopted the name of the First 
Presbyterian Church, but no steps had been taken for the 
purpose of incorporating the Society. On November 24, 1835, 
a meeting of the members was held, in pursuance of "The Act 
Concerning Religious Societies," approved February 6, 1835, 
by the legislature, at which meeting the Society assumed 
the name of "The First Presbyterian Church and Society of 
Chicago," and elected five Trustees thereof, to hold ol!ice for 
one year, viz: Louis T. Jamison,^ Peter Bolles,- William H. 
Brown, ^ Hiram Pearsons'* and William H. Taylor,^ a cer- 
tificate of whose election was made and recorded according 
to the provisions of the said act. 

During the two years which elapsed before a successor 
to Mr. Porter was secured, the pulpit was supplied partly by 
the Rev. Issac T. Hinton,^ Minister of the First Baptist 
Church, the Rev. William McLean^ and the Rev. J. J. 

' Captain Louis Titus Jamison, U. S. A., a native of Virginia, was one of the 
officers of the garrison who came with Mr. Porter in May, 1833, from Fort Brady. At 
this time (1835) he had charge of the government work on the harbor; died in October, 
1856, aged fifty-one. at Rio Grande, Tex., where he resided after the Mexican War. 

2 Mr. Peter BoUes was a member of the committee for obtaining a charter for the 
city of Chicago. At the first city election in 1837, he was chosen alderman from the 
second ward; school inspector in 1839; died in New York City, August 19, 1839, aged 
forty-five. 

3 Mr. WiUiam H. Brown came to Chicago in 1835, and was received into the mem- 
bership of the Church November 3 of that year. In June of the following year he 
was chosen Elder, an office he continued to hold until 1842, when he withdrew with 
others to organize the Second Presbyterian Church. He was a philanthropist and an 
influential friend of the Chicago public schools, acting as school agent from 1840 to 
1853. He served the people so ably in this capacity that Brown School, built in 
1855, was named for him. The Chicago Historical Society chose him as its first Presi- 
dent in 1856. Mr. Brown died in Amsterdam, Holland, June 17, 1867, aged seventy- 
two. 

^ Mr. Hiram Pearsons came to Chicago before 1833. At the first city election in 
1837, he was chosen Treasurer; afterward, alderman of the sixth ward. He was a 
large real estate operator; died at Alameda, Cal., August 11, 1868, aged fifty-seven. 

' Mr. William H. Taylor is now living at Brookline, Mass. While in Chicago, 
he was a shoe merchant, and resided at the southeast comer of Wabash avenue and 
Congress street. 

' Hon. John Wentworth, in a lecture delivered May 7, 1876, said of Mr. Hinton. 
"He was a man who never seemed so happy as when immersing converted sinners in 
our frozen river or lake. It was said of his converts, that no one of them was ever 
known to be a backslider. It is also claimed for Mr. Hinton that no couple he married 
was ever divorced. He was just as careful in marrj'ing as he was in baptizing. He 
wanted nobody to fall from grace." (Andreas' "History of Chicago," Vol. I, page 
318.) Mr. Hinton died of yellow fever in New Orleans, August 28, 1847, aged forty- 
eight. 

' Miss Frances L. Willard, one of the early teachers in Chicago, wrote of Mr. Mc- 
Lean in a letter. May 25, 1836, "He preaches with eloquence and in a studied argu- 




JOHN- BLATCHFORD. 
From a daguerreotype in the possession of Mr E W Hlcitchford. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 27 

Miter. ^ "Mr. Hinton became virtually the Minister of the Pres- 
byterian as well as the Baptist Church," says Dr. Mitchell; 
"both Congregations were his auditors." Mr. Porter, in his 
pamphlet on "The Earliest Religious History of Chicago," 
shows how intimate were the relations between the two 
Churches. "The First Baptist Church was organized October 
19, 1833, under the pastorship of the Rev. Allen B. Freeman, 
Previous to his coming, his principal supporters. Dr. John T. 
Temple and others, had attended our meetings in the fort 
and at Wolf Point, and until our Church was built, Mr. 
Freeman and I preached alternately in a room on Franklin 
street. "- 

Mr. Freeman died of typhoid fever December 17, 1834, 
aged twenty-seven, and his funeral services were held in the 
First Presbyterian Church, Mr. Porter preaching the sermon. 
These cordial relations between the two Churches continued 
during the pastorate of the Rev. Isaac T. Hinton, as the 
Ministers "felt bound together by the warmest and strongest 
bonds." 

There were at that time two men in the West who were 
afterward to become devoted Ministers of this Church — 
the Rev. John Blatchford and the Rev. Flavel Bascom. 
Each had visited the scene of his future labors, each appre- 
ciated the responsibilities of the work, each recognized the 
growing importance of the young city and the great need 
for the preaching of the Gospel. 

The Rev. John Blatchford started west in 1836, and, 
after a brief stay in Chicago, went to Jacksonville, 111., where) 

mentative style. Mr. McLean says that, in all his travels, he was never in a place 
where money was talked of as here. Ten thousand dollars is nothing! fifty thousand! 
one hundred thousand only are named." (Andreas' "Historj' of Chicago." Vol. I, 
page 301.) The Rev. William McLean was aftersvard, from 1837 to 1840, Minister of 
the First Presbyterian Church of Washington, D. C, in which city he died February 
13, 1873, aged sixty-six. 

1 The Rev. John J. Miter was the stated supply, 1839-40, of the Presbyterian 
Church in Knoxville, 111. 

2 "In this room," said a writer in the Chicago Magazine of June 15th, 1857, "Pres- 
byterians, Baptists and Methodists all met for worship, and such was the harmony 
of feeling and simple hearted view of the road to Heaven in those barbarous days, 
that it was no uncommon sight to see three clergj-men jointly ministering to the mixed 
flock during the same morning ser\'ice. Brothers Porter, Freeman and Whitehead, 
often side by side, perched up at one end of the room behind a structure meant for a 
pulpit, which looked no larger than a decent sized ice box, broke the bread of life to 
the waiting few." 



28 A HISTORY OF THE 

he spent the winter of 1836-37. There he received a call 

from the First Presbyterian Church of Chicago, which he ac- 

• cepted, and was installed as its first Minister, July 1, 1837. 

For a few years, the people had to content themselves 
with their simple frame meeting house, although some de- 
sired changes were effected in its condition and location. 
The former situation had become undesirable, as the adja- 
cent property was in demand for business purposes, and the 
people were going to the southern part of the city for their 
homes, "away out on the prairie below Van Buren street." 
The building was moved in 1837-38 from its original position 
on Clark street, near Lake, to the corner of Clark street and 
the alley, now known as Calhoun Place, south of Washing- 
ton street and facing Clark, being the south fifty feet of Lot 
One, in Block Fifty-six, Original Town of Chicago. During the 
seven years following and prior to the purchase of the land 
by the Society, the owners did not demand any rental, as 
they "regarded the presence of the Church a blessing to the 
whole community." After two years of unceasing labor, Dr. 
Blatchford's health gave way, and, on August 18, 1839, he 
terminated his work in Chicago. 

On October 6, 1839, a call was extended to the Rev. 
Albert Hale. 

The records of the Session read : 

"Session met at the house of Mr. Carpenter. Present, Mr. John 
Wright, Moderator, Philo Carpenter, B. W. Raymond and W. H. 
Brown. After prayer, on motion, it was resolved that we give a call 
to the Rev. Albert Hale to become the pastor of this Church at a 
salary of SI, 000, pledging the Church for a larger sum should the 
first be insufficient." 

Mr. Hale, afterward known as "Father" Hale, the friend 
of Abraham Lincoln, declined the invitation. 

The Rev. Flavel Bascom first came to Chicago on his 
wedding journey in July, 1833,^ and was invited to preach, as 
Mr. Porter had an appointment in the country. Unwilling 
to accept the accommodations at Beaubien's Hotel, and 
finding Rufus Brown's- log boarding house full, he was at 

' "Historical Sermon," by Rev. John H. Barrows. D. D., page 23. 

2 "Most of the members of my original Church," says Mr. Porter, "except those in 
the army, were of this family, so that Mrs. Brown could with much truth say, 'the 
Church that is in my house.' " ("Earliest Religious History of Chicago," page 58.) 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 29 

length induced to encamp in the study of the absent Min- 
ister, above Peck's store. Provided with matches and a 
tallow candle by Mr. Brown's family, he escorted his bride 
through the prairie grass to that home of commerce and piety, 
and in the Minister's study, furnished with calico hangings, 
made his abode while in Chicago. On Sunday, he preached 
in the carpenter shop at the fort, his first sermon in Illinois. 
The text was: "Be ye, therefore, perfect, even as your Father 
which is in Heaven is perfect." (St. Matt, v: 48.) 

In the winter of 1839-40, Mr. Bascom came to Chicago 
as agent of the American Home Missionary Society, and 
began preaching for the First Church, "having been excused 
from traveling over the Illinois prairies in winter." At a 
meeting of the Session, held January 21, 1840, a formal call 
was extended to him to become the Minister of the Church : 

"Mr. Bascom having vacated the chair, Mr. Carpenter was ap- 
pointed Moderator, when it was voted that a call be given, in pursu- 
ance of a vote of the Church and Congregation, to the Rev. F. Bascom 
to become the pastor of this Church, and that a salary of $1,000 be 
included in said call." 

Mr. Bascom accepted the pastorate "with the under- 
standing that he might do missionary work during the sum- 
mer." He was installed on Sunday, November 11, 1840. 

The nine years' ministry of the Rev. Flavel Bascom, 
D. D., covered a period of remarkable growth in the mem- 
bership and affairs of the Church. The old frame meeting 
house was again enlarged by increasing its width, and, as 
the Society was now in a condition to have a home of its 
own, plans were under consideration for a permanent build- 
ing. 

On May 7, 1844, the Church purchased from Samuel and 
F. A. Russell, all of Lot One, in Block Fifty-six, Original Town 
of Chicago, on the south end of which the "Wooden Church" 
was then standing. Though the Trustees acquired a front- 
age of eighty feet on Washington street and one hundred 
and eighty feet on Clark street, the space was not sufficient 
to give proper light and ventilation for the building con- 
templated. An agreement was thereupon entered into with 
Robert Freeman, whereby title was acquired to the east 
twenty-seven feet of Lot Two, in Block Fifty-six, immediately 



30 A HISTORY OF THE 

west of and adjoining Lot One. The deed from Freeman to the 
Trustees was recorded December 19, 1849. This made a 
total frontage of one hundred and seven feet on Washington 
street. The foundations of the "Brick Church" were laid in 

1847, and, in September, 1849, the building was dedicated.^ 
In the meantime, the finances of the Society were in such a 
condition that it became necessary for the Trustees to sell a 
portion of the lot, according to an advertisement which ap- 
peared in the Daily Tribune of July 20, 1848: 

VALUABLE LOTS FOR SALE. 

The south fifty feet, fronting on Clark street, oi 
lot 4 {should be hi I — Author), in block 56, being 
the same on which the old building of the First Pres- 
byterian Church now stands. Terms of sale, cash. 
By order of the Board of Trustees. 

Samuel Howe, Secretary. « 
This piece of ground, including the portion of the east 
twenty-seven feet of Lot Two, immediately in the rear thereof, 
was purchased by Mr. Philip F. W. Peck, November 23, 

1848, for $1,850, the deed being signed by Sylvester Lind,^ 
Jabez Barber," Sylvester Marsh,^ R. C. Bristol, « and Clau- 
dius B. Nelson, Trustees. 



1 "The cost of the building was about $24,000," says Dr. Mitchell, "and a serious 
debt was incurred, which greatly embarrassed the Society." 

* Mr. Samuel Howe, an early member of the Chicago Board of Trade, was bom 
at York, Pa., December 20, 1812. During his life of thirty years in Chicago, he was 
an active worker in the interests of a number of religious, charitable and educational 
institutions; among them may be noted the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of the 
Northwest, the Half Orphan Asylum and the Howe Mission. Mr. Howe died in Oak 
Park. May 2, 1872. 

' Mr. Sylvester Lind, a native of Scotland, came to Chicago in 1837, and for a 
long time was engaged in the lumber business. He was a member of the Session 
from May 8, 1848, until January 7, 1856. He had charge of the rebuilding of the 
■'Wooden Church" on Clark street (about 1842) during the ministry of the Rev. Flavel 
Bascom. Lind University was named for him. Mr. Lind died at Lake Forest, 111., 
February 6, 1892, aged eighty-four. 

* Mr. Jabez Barber was in the lumber trade, and accumulated a large fortune. 
He was clerk of the Session from October 24, 1848, until November 29, 1849. In 
1855, with his wife and one child, he went to Europe, embarking on the return voyage 
at Liverpool, January 23, 1856, on the ill-fated Collins' Line steamer 'Pacific," which 
was never heard from. 

' Mr. Sylvester Marsh came to Chicago in 1834. He was a pioneer in the packing 
business. He organized the White Mountain R. R. Co. Died at Concord, N. H., De- 
cember 30, 1884, aged eighty-one. 

» Mr. Richard Clarke Bristol was an early lake captain: an insurance agent in 
1842, and a member of the Board of Underwriters. Before that time he was engaged 
in the forwarding and commission business with Mr. Hibbard Porter, under the firm 
name of Bristol & Porter. Mr. Bristol died at Brooklyn, N. Y., July 10, 1866, aged 
fifty-eight. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 31 

On, or about, the time of this sale, it was discovered that 
the proceedings and certificates of election of the Trustees 
had not been made in all respects according to the statute. 
A special act of the legislature was passed February 8, 1849, 
legalizing all former acts of the Society, and declaring Syl- 
vester Lind, Jabez Barber, R. C. Bristol, Sylvester Marsh 
and Samuel Howe, who were elected Trustees, February 22, 
1848, "to be the legal successors in ofhce of any Trustees of 
said Church and Society at any time heretofore elected, 
and that the property of said First Presbyterian Church of 
Chicago shall vest in the above named Trustees and their 
successors in office," etc. 

Seven years later it became necessary for the Church to 
move still farther south, and on October 19, 1855, the Trus- 
tees entered into a contract for the sale of the remaining 
portion of this ground, covering the one hundred and seven 
feet frontage on Washington street and the one hundred 
and thirty feet on Clark street, with the brick edifice, to Mr. 
Hugh Maher^ at a price of $65,000. Mr. Peck purchased 
this contract from Mr. Maher, and received a deed, dated 
November 22, 1855, signed by Charles N. Henderson, ^ Amzi 
Benedict,^ Claudius B. Nelson, Samuel P. Farrington and 
Augustus G. Downs, Trustees. 

The heirs of the Peck estate have kindly given me the 
opportunity of examining the two deeds conveying the prop- 
erty to Mr. Philip F. W. Peck,^ documents prepared by Mr. 



1 Mr. Hugh Maher, a native of Ireland, came to Chicago in 1837. He was one 
of the boldest and shrewdest real estate operators of his day. "At one time, he owned 
the entire frontage of both sides of the Chicago river from Sixteenth street to Eigh- 
teenth street." He died in Hyde Park, January 22, 1884, aged sixty-six. 

2 The name of Henderson has been associated with the boot and shoe industry 
of this country for nearly fifty years. Mr. Charles Nelson Henderson founded the 
firm of C. N. Henderson & Co. in 1852. After his death, January 4, 1859, the busi- 
ness was carried on by his nephew under the name of C. M. Henderson & Co. 

3 Mr. Amzi Benedict of the firm of Field, Benedict & Co., dr^- goods merchants, 
was bom November 14, 1826, at Verona, N. Y.; came to Chicago in 1849; was received 
into the membership of the First Church. September 17, 1849; died in Chicago, April 
20, 1913. 

^ Mr. Philip F. W. Peck came to Chicago in 1830, bringing a stock of general 
merchandise. Soon after his arrival, he bought the lot at the southeast comer of 
South Water and Lake Streets for the sum of twenty-five dollars. On this lot he 
erected (1831) the first frame building in Chicago. The second stor>- was the lodging 
place and study of the Rev. Jeremiah Porter. 



32 A HISTORY OF THE 

Peck with great care. He wished to get all the title the 
Church had, and that he might be sure he was dealing with 
the people calling themselves the First Presbyterian Church, 
he named the Society in the body of the deed in four distinct 
ways: 

"The First Presbyterian Church and Society of Chicago, other- 
wise known as, 

"The Presbyterian Church and Society of Chicago, otherwise 
known as, 

"The Presbyterian Church of Chicago, otherwise known as, 

"The First Presbyterian Church in the City of Chicago." 

This property is now the site of the Chicago Opera 
House. After the Society moved to Wabash avenue in 1857, 
the "Brick Church" was used for various purposes. In 1858, 
it was occupied by the Mechanics' Institute. About the 
beginning of the war, it was converted into a music hall, 
known as Smith & Nixon Hall, and was a popular place for 
concerts and lectures. 

The "Brick Church" had been dedicated in September, 
1849, and soon after, the Rev. Flavel Bascom, D. D., sev- 
ered his connection with the Church. The Chicago Weekly 
Democrat of December 4, 1849, contains this paragraph: 

"On Tuesday evening last, the Society (First Presbyterian 
Church) met and called the Rev. George F. Magoun, of Galena, 111. Mr. 
Magoun is said to be a preacher of eminent ability and fine social 
accomplishments. It was also resolved to give to the Rev. Dr. Bascom, 
the late popular pastor, a friendly call at his residence on Madison 
between Wells and Franklin streets, on Monday evening next." 

The Sessional record of the year 1849 ends with this 
note: 

"The past year, full of mercies and testifying to the forbearance 
and long suffering of our Saviour, has closed upon the history 
of this Church. In addition to the numerous vacancies made in the 
Church rolls by dismissions and deaths, especially by the awful visi- 
tation of cholera, the Church has to record the separation between 
themselves and their esteemed pastor, the Rev. Flavel Bascom, who was 
dismissed at his own request on the 4th of December, after laboring 
among them with much acceptance for ten years. On the same day 
a call was forwarded to the Rev. George F. Magoun, of the Second 
Presbyterian Church at Galena, to take upon himself the pastoral 
ofliceof this Church; and the Rev. Mr. Walker, late pastor of the Third 
Presbyterian Church of this city, was invited to fill the pulpit ad 
ititerim. (Signed) Sam'l Brookes, Clerk." 




THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN' CHI RCH ii; 



lUt n .0 1 . U nl I)l,l,lU ^'llbh^hlPl, Cc 

THE HRICK CHIRCH"). 



FIRST PRESBYTEF^IAN CHURCH. 33 

The invitation to Mr. Magoun was followed by the ap- 
pointment of delegates to visit him and urge his accept- 
ance. On March 10, 1850, another invitation was sent to 
Mr. Magoun: 

"The Church and Session, having resolved to send a second invi- 
tation to the Rev. George F. Magoun to become pastor, a call and 
letter to the Church at Galena were forwarded per mail. The income 
to be fourteen hundred dollars." 

As Mr. Magoun's name does not appear again in the 
record, the call must have been declined. 

The Rev. Harvey Curtis was called to the pastorate of 
the Church at a meeting held Monday, July 1, 1850: 

"Session met after a full meeting of the Church and Congregation, 
at which a vote was taken, with but one dissentient voice, to call the 
Rev. H. Curtis, of Madison, Indiana, to take upon himself the pas- 
toral office of this Church, with a salary of SI, 500 per annum." 

Mr. Curtis began his pastorate August 26, 1850, ac- 
cording to the record of a Session meeting held that day. 

The installation services of Mr. Curtis are thus noted: 

"On Sabbath Day, October 7, ISoO, the Rev. H. Curtis was in- 
stalled as pastor over this Church. The Rev. Mr. Patterson preached 
the sermon, the Rev. Mr. Goss gave the charge to the pastor, the Rev. 
Mr. Bascom gave the charge to the people, and the Rev. Mr. Weed 
offered the prayer." 

The first part of Dr. Curtis' ministry was a period of 
trial and anxiety, but he conducted the Church through 
those perilous times "with consummate wisdom." "He be- 
gan his labors under difficulties. An embarrassing debt was 
on the Church. There were painful differences among the 
members as to the best methods of anti-slavery work." 

The affairs of the Society were in such a state at this 
time that at a meeting on Thursday evening, September 11, 
1851, "the question of separation and division of Church 
property was seriously entertained." At a joint meeting of 
the Session, Trustees and Minister, on Monday evening, Sep- 
tember 22, the matter was finally "left in the hands of the 
Session," who resolved, on October 27, "that a separation 
of the Church was not desirable at the present time." 

The members of the Church had very decided views on 
the subject of slavery, as may be seen from the record of a 
meeting on January 3, 1853: 



34 A HISTORY OF THE 

"The first Monday in the New Year was spent by the Church in 
religious exercises and review of God's dealing with it during the 
past year. 

"The following declaration of sentiment in relation to some of 
the moral questions of the day, in which Christian feeling is deeply 
interested, was adopted." 

Passing over the preamble, which declares that, "the 
will of God as revealed in the Holy Scriptures is the only 
authoritative and infallible rule of duty to all mankind," 
and Article I, which sets forth the duty of Christians and 
all philanthropists, "to abstain from and discountenance in 
others all violations of the Sabbath as a heaven appointed 
day of rest," we come to the remaining portion of the "de- 
claration," the discussion of which had for a long time threat- 
ened the very existence of the Society: 

"Article II. We regard the system of American Slavery as a 
gross invasion of the natural rights of man and a grievous outrage 
upon the principles of that civil liberty we enjoy and that Protest- 
ant Christianity we profess, a moral wrong which must be offensive 
to God, and which is most injurious to the temporal prosperity and 
happiness and to the spiritual well being of all connected with it. 
And for its speedy overthrow, we invoke the co-operation of all 
humane and philanthropic and Christian people, and the interposi- 
tion of Almighty God. 

"Article III. We hold the recent 'Fugitive Slave Law' to be a 
palpable violation of some of the fundamental principles of our Fed- 
eral and State Constitutions; and opposed to the natural promptings 
of humanity and the precepts of Christianity, and as such we shall 
not cease to demand and labor for its repeal. 

"Article IV. We regard the laws of this State in respect to col- 
ored people as most oppressive and needlessly cruel, and altogether 
unworthy of a free and generous and Christian people; and we will 
heartily co-operate in any wise and effectual means for their repeal." 

Article V dealt with the subject of intemperance. The 
members "hailed the passage of the 'Maine Liquor Law' as a 
wise, proper and effectual means of suppressing the evil." 

In consequence of dissension on the slavery question, 
twenty-six members withdrew in 1842 to form the Second 
Presbyterian Church. 

"During that time," said Dr. Patterson^ in his address 
at the Jubilee Celebration of the Second Church in 1892, 

' ■History of the Second Presbyterian Church, Chicago," 1892, pages 269 and 270. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 35 

"there was a further development in the Church of extreme 
abolitionism and of sympathy with what was then styled 
Oberlin Perfectionism, which led to a distinct and visible 
growth of aggressive and conservative parties." It led to 
the inauguration of "a movement for the establishment of 
a second Church, where the more conservative Presbyterian 
families of the city might find and enjoy a quiet, religious 
home suited to their wishes and wants." "I have said," 
continued Dr. Patterson, "that the Second Church was at 
first conservative in regard to the slavery question and 
Christian doctrine. It was, however, always decidedly anti- 
slavery, averse to revolutionary action on that subject. On 
these accounts the Minister and the Church were denounced 
from the beginning as pro-slavery, and it was openly claimed 
that all the piety remained in the mother Church." 

Then came the rupture between Congregationalism and 
Presbyterianism, resulting in the withdrawal in 1852 of forty- 
eight members from the First Church for the organization, 
December 1, of Plymouth Congregational Church. "At that 
critical epoch," said Dr. Patterson, "it was confidently pre- 
dicted that in ten years there would not be a Presbyterian 
Church left in Chicago. But this intense denominational 
feeling soon abated, and Christian comity prevailed, as it 
has continued to do ever since." 

The withdrawals from the First Church continued until 
the membership had decreased from 450 to 254. May not the 
"declaration of sentiment" of January 3, 1853, be regarded as a 
shout of victory from the survivors, who, having routed all 
their opponents, were now in undisputed possession of the field? 

Relieved of all disturbing elements, the Church entered 
once more on a season of prosperity, and was greatly blessed 
during the remaining years of the pastorate of Dr. Curtis. 
The membership, which had been depleted fully one-half by 
this "period of strife and rebuke," was increased "in the 
winter and spring of 1852 by a gentle but precious season of 
spiritual refreshing." 

The "Brick Church" was sold because "it was found," 
said Dr. Humphrey,^ "that the location was not good, the 

' "Historical Sketch." by Rev. Z. M. Humphrey. D. D., 1867. page 5. 



36 A HISTORY OF THE 

surrounding population being driven away by the encroach- 
ments of business, and the place becoming constantly more 
and more dusty and noisy. At the same time an increase 
of Church sittings was needed to supply the wants of the 
rapidly increasing population." It was decided, after pay- 
ing the outstanding indebtedness, to "divide the proceeds in 
such a manner as to secure the speedy erection of three 
Church buildings in the three divisions of our city. This 
plan was carried out with the generous hope that the mem- 
bers on the West Side would unite with the Third Presby- 
terian Church, and those on the North Side with the West- 
minster, now the Fourth Church." 

On November 6, 1855, the Trustees— Charles N. Hender- 
son, Claudius B. Nelson, Samuel P. Farrington, Augustus 
Gay Downs and Amzi Benedict— purchased from Mr. Carlton 
Drake, the north half of Lot Eight in Block Ten, in Fractional 
Section Fifteen Addition to Chicago. Six months later, to a 
day, May 6, 1856, Mr. Austin Goodrich conveyed to the same 
Trustees the south half of said Lot Eight, making a total front- 
age of eighty feet on Wabash avenue.^ The cost of the 
entire property was about $12,500. 

The new edifice was commenced in 185G, and com- 
pleted in October, 1857, under the supervision of Boyington 
& Wheelock, architects. ^ The Chicago Daily Press of Fri- 
day, October 16, 1857, gives the following account of the 

1 This property is now known as the premises Nos. 426-434 So. Wabash avenue. 
In 1872 the Church had the opportunity of selhng this land at $80,000, cash, but de- 
clined the offer, to accept one of $100,000, of which $20,000 was in cash and $80,000 
in deferred payments. It was the expectation at the time (1872) that the proceeds 
of the sale of this property would pay the cost of the new edifice at the comer of Indi- 
ana avenue and Twenty-first street. But the purchaser could not even pay the inter- 
est on the deferred payments, and the property, after some years, reverted to the 
Society. In the meantime a mortgage of $70,000 had to be raised on the Indiana 
avenue edifice for its completion. The Wabash avenue lot was finally sold in 1880 at 
about $400 per front foot. As an evidence of the enormous growth in real estate 
values within the last fifteen years, the south forty feet (one-half of the old Church 
lot) was sold in 1897 for $150,000. 

' Mr. W. W. Boyington was bom July 18, 1822, in Southwick, Mass., came to 
Chicago in 1853, and died at Highland Park, 111., October 16, 1898. He built the 
St. Paul's UniversaUst Church (1856), First Presbyterian Church (1857), Wabash 
avenue M. E. Church (1858), and in later years the Board of Trade, Exposition Build- 
ing, Columbus Memorial and other important buildings. He was Chicago's first pro- 
fessional architect. 

Mr. Otis Leonard Wheelock died at San Jose, Cal., January 23, 1893, aged seventy- 
seven. 




THIKIi I'KHSHVTHRIAX CHIRCH 
West Washmgl.in Street il870i. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 37 

dedicatory services, which took place on the previoiie even- 
ing: 

"There was an impressive sermon by the pastor, Dr. Curtis. 
Mr. W. H. Currie, the accomplished organist of St. Paul's, brought 
out the power of the fine organ in a striking manner. Although the 
weather was unfavorable, there was a large audience present. The 
house is finely lighted by day through the rich stained glass windows 
in the ceiling, and the effect of gas Hght on the interior at night is 
the finest possible." 

The same paper on Monday, October 19, 1857, gives 
further details of the interior finish: 

"The pulpit is located in front of the organ gallery (at the west 
end of the Church), semi-octagon in form, and is grained in imitation 
of English oak. The case, or screen, is executed in the same style of 
architecture as the other parts of the house, and was designed by the 
architect to fill the place arranged for it. The instrument was built 
by the well known firm of Hall & Labagh, of New York City." 

The Daily Press closes its article on the description of 
the Church, with this notice from the Trustees, regarding 
the sale of pews to be held on the evening of October 19: 

"In view of the favorable circumstances of the Society and the 
present stringency in monetary affairs, and wishing to place it within 
the means of every member of the Society to purchase a seat, the 
Trustees are induced to offer the most favorable terms: ten per cent 
cash, ten per cent in three months, five per cent in six months, and 
the balance in one, two and three years from day of sale, with inter- 
est at ten per cent. The prices of pews range from $25 to $800." 

The total cost of the land, building, organ and furnish- 
ings was about $135,000. 

Early in the year 1858, Dr. Curtis was elected President 
of Knox College at Galesburg, 111., and on the evening of 
June 8, his resignation as Minister was laid before a meeting 
of the Church and Congregation. A resolution offered by Mr. 
E. S. Wells was unanimously adopted: 

"That in reviewing the past eight years of Christian labor, 
counsel and fellowship, under the leadership of Dr. Curtis, we can 
see how kindly have been the dealings of God with us, in giving us 
one so pre-eminently qualified as an expounder of the Bible, a faith- 
ful and affectionate pastor and sympathetic friend." 

The members of the Church and Congregation met on 
Monday evening, July 12, 1858, the late Minister, the Rev. Har- 
vey Curtis, D. D., acting as Moderator, and i\Ir. J. H. Brown 



38 A HISTORY OF THE 

as Secretary, and unanimously adopted a resolution offered 
by Mr. S. H. Pierson : 

"That the Session be and are hereb}' authorized to extend an 
unanimous call to the Rev. Theodore L. Cuyler, of New York City, 
to become the pastor of this Church." 

The Session and Trustees met on the following evening, 
July 13, and appointed Mr. E. S. Wells and Mr. Henry E. 
Seelye a committee to visit the Rev. Theodore L. Cuyler and 
tender him the call. At the next meeting, Monday even- 
ing, September 6, the committee made a report that it was 
doubtful if Mr. Cuyler would accept the pastorate of this 
Church, whereupon a resolution offered by Dr. R. C. Hamill 
was adopted: 

"That the Rev. Theodore L. Cuyler be advised of the unanimity 
of this Church in the continuance of the call, and that a committee 
of five be appointed to draft a series of resolutions expressive of the 
sense of this meeting." 

A committee was thereupon appointed, consisting of 
H. T. Wilson, Dr. R. Ludlam.^ J. W. Smith, J. M. Mather and 
George W. Perkins,^ who brought in a report before the close 
of the evening, which was in substance; 

"That the committee heretofore appointed to confer with Mr. 
Cuyler be continued, and that they are hereby authorized to convey 
to him the unanimous, the unqualified and earnest assurance of this 
Church and Congregation that it is their sincere and fervent desire 
to obtain an early acceptance of their call. 

"Rcsolrcd, That it is still the unanimous conviction of this 
Church that God in His Providence has designed the Rev. Theodore 
L. Cuyler to be its pastor." 

In the meantime, the Session, at a meeting, September 
20, invited the Rev. S. S. Smith to serve as temporary supply 
for three months or less, commencing October 1, with a sal- 
ary at the rate of $2,000 per annum. 



' Dr. Reuben lAidlam. Sr., President of Hahnemann College and a celebrated 
surgeon, was bom in Camden. N. J., in 1831; died in Chicago, April 29, 1899. Mrs. 
Ludlam was received into the membership of the First Church, January 4, 1862; died 
September 16, 1900, in Chicago. 

* Mr. George W. Perkins was admitted to membership in the First Church, March 
9, 1858. He was the second Superintendent (1868) of Railroad Mission, then on 
Griswold street. He was bom December 25, 1833, in Meadville, Pa.; died March 
29, 1886, in Cleveland, Ohio. His son, Mr. George Walbridge Perkins, the financier 
and partner for many years in the banking firm of J. P. Morgan & Co., New York 
City, was bom in Chicago, January 31, 1862. 




CHoUCIv W r>HKKIN> 



FIRST PRESB't'TERIAN CHURCH. 39 

Monday evening, September 27, the original committee 
who were appointed to wait upon Mr. Cuyler, appeared be- 
fore the Church and Congregation and reported: 

"\Vc have received a letter from Mr. Cuyler, in wiiich he states 
that, having again taken the matter into prayerful consideration, 
and carefully weighed the importance of the two fields, he was still 
of the opinion that the interests of Christ's kingdom at large could 
and would be better promoted without a change of field, and that 
he must therefore decline the call which had been extended to him." 

The name of the Rev. John G. Atterbury, of New Albany, 
Ind., was then presented by Mr. G. H. Hazelton as one in 
every way qualified to become Minister of the Church. 

Mr. S. H. Pierson suggested the name of the Rev. Dr. 
Burchard, of New York City, as a candidate for the pas- 
torate. 

A ballot was then taken, resulting in eighty-seven votes 
being cast, of which thirty-three were for the Rev. J. G. 
Atterbury, and fifty-four were blanks. 

A resolution offered by Mr. C. A. Norton shows that 
the people had hopes of yet securing Mr. Cuyler: 

"That the original committee be requested to again confer with 
Mr. Cuyler, and, furthermore, that they earnestly entreat Mr. Cuy- 
ler to visit the Church before the matter is entirely dismissed from 
his mind, and to see for himself what are the wants of the Church." 

"Early in the month of October," says Mr. Henry M. 
Curtis, "Mr. Cuyler came out from New York City and 
preached for us. The Church was crowded at each service." 

The committee reported October 18: 

"That they had conferred with Mr. Cuyler, and that there was 
no hope of his accepting the pastorate of the Church." 

A resolution offered by Mr. J. W. Smith was then 
adopted : 

"We do still believe that God has some good man in reserve for 
this Church, and that the only way to secure a permanent pastor is 
to refer the matter to the Session, and when they are able to recom- 
mend the name of one who will not only be acceptable to our whole 
Church, but who also manifests a willingness to accept the call, that 
they invite him to preach before the Congregation." 

Monday evening, April 4, 1859, Mr. F. V. Chamber- 
lain, on behalf of the Session, reported that they had con- 
ferred with the Rev. Z. M. Humphrey of Milwaukee; that as a 



40 A HISTORY OF THE 

committee they had heard him preach, and that they were 
of the opinion that "the best interests of the Church and the 
cause of Christ would be consulted by sending a call to Mr. 
Humphrey." 

An informal ballot was then taken, resulting in Mr. 
Humphrey receiving all but seven votes. On the regular 
ballot which followed, he was unanimously chosen Minister 
and "his salary faxed at $3,000 per annum." He began his 
labors May 15, 1859. 

During the ministry of Dr. Humphrey, the towers of the 
Church building on Wabash avenue were completed. On 
March 27, 1864, a new brick and stone building for the use 
of the Railroad Mission, erected at a cost of about SI 8,000, 
was appropriately dedicated. The building stood on the east 
side of Griswold street, on the premises (old Nos.) 48 and 50 
Pacific avenue. A new chapel was built at 45 and 47 (old 
Nos.) Congress street, and was dedicated Sunday evening, 
June 2, 1867, the services consisting of the usual opening ex- 
ercises, followed by addresses from Dr. Humphrey, Mr. 
Leonard Swett, Mr. E. S. Wells and others. 

On the morning of that day, June 2, the Second Presby- 
terian Church celebrated the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary of the 
foundation of their Church and the installation of its first, 
and, up to that time, only Minister, the Rev. Robert W. 
Patterson, D. D. 

Dr. Humphrey tendered his resignation Monday even- 
ing, February 3, 1868, to accept a call from Calvary Church, 
Philadelphia. After the reading and acceptance of his letter 
of resignation, on motion of Mr. E. S. Wells, a resolution was 
passed requesting the Presbytery "to dissolve the ecclesias- 
tical relations so long and pleasantly existing between the 
people and the pastor of this Church, for the reasons repre- 
sented by him." 

Mr. S. P. Farrington^ suggested "that the salary of the 
Minister be continued for a term of six months after his 



' Mr. Samuel Putnam I'arrington was bom at Hopkinton, N. H., January 29, 
1819. He came to Chicago in 1850, and founded a wholesale grocery business, con- 
tinuing in that line until 1S84, when he removed to Minneapolis, Minn. He was re- 
ceived into the membership of the Church, July 5, 1862; died at Minneapolis, April 
7, 1897. 



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WABASH AVEXUE M. H. CHURCH il.S.SV). 

Corner of Harrison Street, with the First Presbyterian and ,St. 

Universahst Churches in the Distance. 

From the Collection of Mr. Frank W. Smith. 



FIRST PRESIiYTERIAN CHURCH. 41 

leave, to give him a chance to recuperate his health before 
entering upon his new pastorate." This was modified by 
Mr. J. W. Smith :i 

"Resolved, That the salary of our Minister, the Rev. Z. M. Hum- 
phrey, D. D., be continued for six months from March 1, on condi- 
tion that he does not enter upon his new pastorate, for continued 
active service, until after that time (September 1)." 

On motion of Mr. E. V. Robbins, this resolution was 
adopted unanimously. 

The particulars regarding the call to the Rev. Arthur 
Mitchell, to become the next Minister of the Church, are set 
forth in the records of the Session. At a meeting of the So- 
ciety, July 10, 1S68, Messrs. Allen,- Brooks,^ Robbins,'* and 
Walker were appointed a committee to act with the Session, 
in selecting a Minister. Several names were offered for con- 
sideration, prominent among them being that of the Rev. 
Arthur Mitchell, of Morristown, N. J. The committee vis- 
ited Morristown, heard Mr. IMitchell preach, and, after care- 
ful consideration of his qualifications, agreed in recommend- 
ing him as their choice. A unanimous call was according- 
ly extended to Mr. Mitchell by the Church, to become its 
Minister, at a salary of $5,000 per year, with an annual va- 
cation of six wrecks and an allowance of $1,000 to defray 
expenses in removal. 

Mr. Mitchell visited Chicago before coming to a decision, 
and on August 24, wrote his letter of acceptance. He began 
his labors October 25, the installation services taking place 
on November 10, following. He came to Chicago at a time 
when all branches of the Church work were in a prosperous 
condition. Greater interest was taJken in the Sunday School 

1 Mr. Joseph W. Smith, for at least forty years an Elder in this Church, was re- 
ceived into its membership, March 10, 1856. He was for twenty years manager of 
the Erie Fast Freight Line; later associated with the Alton R. R. Mr. Smith died at 
Riverside, 111., February 10, 1906; Mrs. Smith died at Riverside, 111., April 13, 1913. 

2 Mr. William T. Allen was a Trustee of the Church and chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Music, from 1861 to 1870; died May 18, 1891. 

2 Mr. Joseph P. Brooks came to Chicago in 1854, and identified himself with the 
Church in 1864. For many years he was a member of the Board of Trustees, and at 
the time of his death, was Treasurer of the Church. He died suddenly June 28, 1873, 
aged forty-seven. The pallbearers at his funeral on June 30, were Dr. Hitchcock, 
Addison Ballard, D. W. Invin, Frank C. Wells, Solomon A. Smith and John C. Dore. 

< Mr. and Mrs. E. V. Robbins now (1900) reside in San Francisco, and are mem- 
bers of Calvar>' Presbyterian Church of that city. 



42 A HISTORY OF 

and missions during the three yesLrs which followed his ar- 
rival than at any time since. In 1868 the Church supported 
five mission schools — the Railroad, P'^oster, Sands, Indiana 
street and Archer avenue — all of which, except the Railroad 
Mission, have since been transferred to the care of other 
Churches. The Church school (1868-1871) numbered 
from 325 to 375 in regular attendance, and the Railroad 
Chapel School from 1868 to the time of the fire had an aver- 
age attendance of about 1,000. 

The records of the Session contain this note regarding 
the destruction of the Church on Wabash avenue in the great 
fire of October, 1871 : 

"On Sunday, October 8, a collection was taken in the Church for 
the benefit of the sufferers from a severe conflagration which had 
visited the West Side on Saturday night. It was Communion Sun- 
day; none realized that it was the last one in the old Church, around 
which so many precious memories clustered. That night a fire 
broke out in the West Division, crossed to the South Side, and then 
to the North, destroying a large portion of the city. Early on Mon- 
day morning our beautiful Church home, as well as its beautiful 
Chapel and the Railroad Mission Chapel, was destroyed. Nothing 
was saved but the records of the Church, the Communion service 
and the Sexton Library." 



CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 43 



THE CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

When my father, Mr. James Otis, came to Chicago with 
his family in 1857, we attended during the first year the South 
Congregational Church, then at the northeast corner of Calu- 
met avenue and Twenty-sixth street. The car works of the 
Illinois Central Railroad were at the foot of Twenty-sixth 
street, between South Park avenue and the lake. The little 
settlement of homes, stores and Churches which grew up 
about the works, was called Carville. In the following year 
my father made the acquaintance of the Rev. J. Ambrose 
Wight, ^ Minister of the Olivet Presbyterian Church, then at 
the northwest corner of Wabash avenue and Twelfth street. 
We had a pew in Olivet Church for a year or more, until the 
project of forming a new Presbyterian Church (Calvary) be- 
gan to take definite shape, an enterprise in which my parents 
were greatly interested. 

The records of Calvary Church, now in my possession, 
show that the first meeting for the purpose of organization 
was held at the Chicago Orphan Asylum on Michigan 
avenue, on the evening of June 20, 1859. Mr. Ebenezer 
Jenkins was called to the chair, and Mr. James Otis was 
appointed Secretary. The meeting adopted a resolution to 
this effect: 

"That in view of the rapid increase of the population; in view of 
the number of professing Christians and of those who are not, who 
have all expressed a wish that a Presbyterian Church should be 
organized in this part of the city; duty to the Head of the Church, 
ourselves, our famihes and the many around us, demands the organi- 
zation of this Church at the earliest practicable moment." 

On motion, the Rev. F. W. Graves, Mr. Joseph jNIeeker 
and Mr. Ebenezer Jenkins w^re appointed a committee to 
ascertain the names of all who were desirous of uniting in 
this organization, whether as members of other Churches or 
on profession of their faith. 

' On July 15, another meeting was held for the purpose 
of preparing a petition to the Presbytery for authority to 
organize the Church. At this meeting IMessrs. Ebenezer 



i The Rev. J. Ambrose Wight removed from Chicago to Bay City, Mich., in 1S64. 
and died there. November 14, 1SS9, aged seventy-eight. 



44 , A HISTORY OF 

Jenkins, Bennett B. Chambers and James Otis were elected 
Elders. 

At a special meeting of the Presbytery, held in the 
Chicago Orphan Asylum, July 19, a petition was pre- 
sented, signed by Mr. James Otis and thirty-four other per- 
sons, asking that the new Presbyterian Church be organized 
under the name of the Calvary Presbyterian Church. A 
number of persons presented letters of dismissal and recom- 
mendation from other Churches, as worthy of membership 
in the new Church: 

from the olivet presbyterian church, chicago. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bennett B. Chambers.' 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Meeker. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Otis. 

Miss Mary Clark. 

from the south presbyterian church, chicago. 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Johnson. 
Miss Maria Johnson. 

from the first PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, CHICAGO. 

Mrs. Ellen Sloan, 
Miss Maria L. Elmers. 

from the SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, CHICAGO. 

Mrs. Catherine Hamlin. 

from the north presbyterian church, buffalo, n. y. 

Mr. and Mrs. William P. Sloan. 

FROM THE first PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, HORNELLSVILLE, N. Y. 

Mrs. Susan E. Graves. 

from the third presbyterian church, chicago. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ebenezer Jenkins. = 

from the south congregational church, chicago. 

Mr. AND Mrs. Jesse B. Langdon. 

Among those who afterward became identified with the 

Church were : 

1 Mr. Bennett B. Chambers died in Chicago, March 29, 1868. Mrs. Mary Eliza 
Chambers died in Chicago, April 28, 1894. 

2 Elder Ebenezer Jenkins was the grandson of Captain Ebenezer Jenkins, of Col. 
Freeman's Cape Cod regiment, who was one of the members of the first legislature of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He was the fifth Ebenezer in this family, 
descended from John Jenkins, who settled in Plymouth, Mass., in 1834. He was a man 
of marked piety, and from a Pilgrim line. Elder Jenkins died in Chicago, October 9, 
1873. This information is furnished by his nephew, the Rev. H. D. Jenkins, D. D., 
pastor (1900) of the Second Presbyterian Church of Kansas City. Mo.; now (1913) 
editor of the Presbyterian paper "Great Lakes." 



CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 45 

Mr. George G. Allen (died November 24, 1891), Mr. and 
Mrs. John Ailing,^ Dr. and Mrs. George K. Amerman. (Dr. 
Amerman was an Elder; died June, 1809.) 

Mr. William M. Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph N. Barker, 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Bacon, Mrs. Ann Eliza Bowers, Mrs. 
Harriet M. Buell, Mrs. Betsy Boilvin. 

Mr. George A. Chambers (died October 19, 1895), Mr. 
and j\Irs. George K. Clark, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Carring- 
ton, Mr. John M. Clark. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Durand,- Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
E. Durand, Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Durand, Miss Dellenbaugh. 

Mr. and Mrs. James M. Gilchrist (Mr. Gilchrist died 
October 10, 1883), Mr. and Mrs. George Gilbert, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. W. Griswold, Mr. Edward P. Griswold (died January 
18, 1899), Mr. WiUiam O. Goodman, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. 
Grey. 

Mrs. Nancy B. Hawes, Mr. and Mrs. James Hollings- 
worth,^ Mr. and Mrs. George M. Howe, Mrs. Jane A. Hurlbut. 

Mr. and Mrs. David W. Irwin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel A. Jones, Miss Harriet G. Jones 
(afterward Mrs. N. Henry Sabin, of Williamstown, Mass.). 

Mrs. Jane Lancaster, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Lord. 

Mr. Townsend MacCoun, Mr. and :\Irs. Willard F. My- 
rick and Miss Mary My rick. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. S. Newell, Miss Harriet Newell, Mrs. 
Julia A. Newell, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Nickson, Hon. and Mrs. 
Jesse O. Norton, Dr. and Mrs. A. B. Newkirk. 

1 Mr. John Ailing of the firm of Markley, Ailing & Co., hardware merchants, came 
to Chicago in 1863, from Madison. Indiana. He was a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees of Calvary Presbyterian Church, at the time of the consolidation with the First 
Church. From 1885 to 1897, he was a member of the Board of Trustees of the First 
Church. Mr. Ailing died April 4, 1900, at his residence. No. 2207 Calumet avenue. 

2 Mr. Henry Clay Durand was bom March 1, 1827, in Clintonville. N. V.; came to 
Chicago in 1852, and in 1859 established the wholesale grocery firm of Durand Bros. ; 
later, Durand & Kasper. At the time of his death he was President of the Board of 
Directors of Lake Forest University. Mr. Durand was a Trustee of Calvary Church 
and a member of the building committee. His death occurred at Highland Park, 
niinois, September 2, 1901. 

Mr. Durand's brothers, Charles Edward and Calvin, associated with him in busi- 
ness, were also natives of Clintonville, N. Y. Charles, bom May 27, 1832, died at Lake 
Forest, Illinois, April 9, 1894; Calvin, bom May 7, 1840, died at Lake Forest, October 
31, 1911. 

' Mr. James HoUingsworth was born October 3, 1811, at Wilmington, Del.; came 
to Chicago in September, 1849. He was elected an Elder in the First Church, Feb- 
ruary- 22, 1853. Later he withdrew to the Third Presbyterian Church, and was elected 
an Elder in that Society, July 27, 1859. Mr. and Mrs. HoUingsworth were dismissed, 
by letter, from the Third Church, July 30, 1869. and admitted to the membership of 
the Calvar>' Presbyterian Church.' After the consolidation of this Church with the 
First Church, Mr. HoUingsworth was again elected an Elder, continuing in ofl5ce until 
his death, January 25, 1889. 



46 A HISTORY OF 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick R. Otis, Miss Delia Otis (after- 
ward Mrs. Henry H. Deming), Miss Lurena B. Otis (afterward 
Mrs. C. H. Starkweather), Mr. Philo Adams Otis, Mr. Charles 
Tillinghast Otis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry. E. Phillips. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leander Reed, Dr. George C. Reynolds, 
Mrs. M. F. Ripley, Mr. and Mrs. Junius Rogers. 

Prof, and Mrs. Alonzo Jesse Sawyer,^ Mr. and Mrs. 
George Atwell Springer (Mr. Springer died February 10, 
1899; aged eighty-three), Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Stewart, 
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Sherman and Miss Margaret Sherman, 
(afterward Mrs. D. H. Burnham). 

Mr.' and Mrs. B. W. Thomas and Miss Thomas. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Wallingford, Mr. H. J. Wallingford, 
Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Wilmarth (Mr. Wilmarth died February 
27, 1885), Mr. and Mrs. John Wright, Mr. Albert Wilcox, 
Mr. Philo Adams Wilbor, Mr.^ and Mrs. Henry Wood. 

For a year or more, the members of the new Church 
worshipped in the school room of the Orphan Asylum. 

At a meeting of the members of Calvary Presbyterian 
Church of South Chicago, Monday evening, July 25, 1859, in 
the Chicago Orphan Asylum, five Trustees were elected to 
hold office until July 1, 1861; Joseph Meeker, Joseph John- 
son, John T. Morris, Benjamin F. Brookfield and James Otis. 

The Rev. Frederick William Graves, first Minister of 
Calvary Church, was born at Leverett, Mass., March 9, 1805. 
His father. Colonel Rufus Graves, was one of the founders 



1 Mr. Alonzo Jesse Sawyer, professor of mathematics and astronomy in the old 
University of Chicago (1859 to about 1870), was bom in 1819 at Crown Point, Essex 
County, New York. He came to Chicago in 1853, and was engaged as principal of 
an English classical and high school, which met in the basement of the "Brick Church" 
(comer of Washington and Clark streets). This school had been organized two or 
three years previously, and its first teacher was Mr. D. H. Temple. Professor Sawyer 
was an Elder in Calvary Church, a member of the Music Committee, and having a pro- 
found knowledge of the Bible, taught the Bible class for several years. Hon. Philetus 
Sawyer, ex-senator from Wisconsin, was his brother. Mr. Elihu Burritt, the reformer 
and "learned blacksmith," who died November 10, 1879, was his brother-in-law. Pro- 
fessor Sawyer died in Chicago, September 16, 1882. 

2 Mr. Benjamin Walter Thomas was bora in Stafford. N. V., August 22, 1821; 
came to Chicago in 1841; was one of the founders of the Westminster Presbyterian 
Church (1855) ; one of the founders of the Chicago Board of Trade; in 1862, was Quarter- 
master of the Seventy-second (Board of Trade) Regiment: died in Chicago, January. 
1905. 

' Mr. Henry Wood, leader of the music (1863-1866) in the Sunday School of Cal- 
vary Church, was bom Januar>' 16. 1834, at Barre, Vt.; came to Chicago in 1863; re- 
moved to Boston, 1882. He retired from mercantile life to become an author, publish- 
ing "God's Image in Man"; "Studies in the Thought World"; "Life More Abundant", 
and other works. Mr. Wood died March 28, 1909, at Brookline, Mass. 



CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 47 

(1825) of Amherst College, and it was for him the Graves 
professorship was named. It is worthy of note that Dr. 
Zephaniah Moore, for whom the Rev. Zephaniah Moore Hum- 
phrey was named, was the first President of Amherst, and 
that the Rev. Frederick William Graves was a member of 
the first class graduated from this honored institution. After 
leaving college, he spent eighteen months in teaching, and, in 
the autumn of 1829, entered the Theological Seminary at 
Andover, graduating in 1833. He was licensed by the Pres- 
bytery of Geneva, N. Y., and after preaching one year to the 
First Free Church of Lockport, N. Y., he removed in 1835, 
to accept the pastorate of the church at Alton, 111. It was 
during his ministry there that the Rev. Elijah P. Lovejoy was 
murdered. Owing to the terrible state of affairs following 
the martyrdom of Lovejoy, Mr. Graves regarded it his duty 
to leave Alton. In the following year, he returned east 
where many Churches and Ministers were greatly helped by 
him in promoting revivals of religion. Thus he labored for 
some nine weeks in the Fourth Presbyterian Church of 
Albany, and, afterward, with Churches in Buffalo, Elmira, 
Corning and Philadelphia. For a year, he traveled over the 
greater part of the state of New York lecturing in the in- 
terest of temperance reform. After leaving Chicago, where 
he was Minister of Calvary Church from June, 1859, to June, 
1860, Mr. Graves accepted a position with the Christian 
Commission, doing much good in the hospitals during the 
war. He died of consumption at Canandaigua, N. Y., De- 
cember 8, 1864, and was buried at Corning, N. Y., where, in 
1834, he had married Miss Susan Hayt, daughter of the late 
Dr. John C. Hayt, of that city. 

Mr. Graves' son, Major E. P. Graves, of Corning, has 
kindly furnished many of the foregoing particulars. 

During the summer of 1860, a lot had been leased on the 
west side of Indiana avenue, midway between Ringgold and 
Palo Alto places (now Twenty-second and Twenty-third 
streets) on which the Society began the erection of a frame 
Church, under the charge of Messrs. James Otis and Eben- 
ezer Jenkins, building committee. The new building was 
about completed when the Rev. Edward Anderson, second 



48 A HISTORY OF 

Minister, began his labors in the autumn of 1860. The 
records of the Session meeting held October 27, 1860, speak 
of the dedication of this building: 

"On motion, it was resolved to hold the dedicatory services in our 
new house of worship on the eleventh day of November next at 7:30 
p. M., and that Rev. Z. M. Humphrey, D. D., be invited to deUver 
the dedicatory sermon, Rev. Arthur Swazey to act as alternate." 

The Rev. Edward Anderson, in a letter dated Novem- 
ber 17, 1898, at his present home in Quincy, Mass., gives a 
few facts regarding his life work. He was born in Boston, 
November 19, 1833, his father, the Rev. Rufus Anderson, 
D. D., LL. D., being for many years foreign Secretary of the 
American Board of Commissioners of Foreign Missions. Mr. 
Anderson was educated in and about Boston. When only 
twenty years of age, he went to Kansas with the Massachu- 
setts men, and was in every important engagement there 
with John Brown and General "Jim" Lane. After his ordi- 
nation as a Minister in 1858, he was called in 1860 to the 
Presbyterian Church in St. Joseph, Mich., whence he re- 
moved to Chicago in October of that year, to take the pas- 
torate of Calvary Church. He resigned in July, 1861, to 
accept the Chaplaincy of the Thirty-seventh regim.ent of the 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Later Mr. Anderson raised three 
regiments in Indiana, in one of w^hich, the Twelfth Cavalry, 
he served as Colonel until the end of the war. In recent 
years, Mr. Anderson is better known as the author of a collec- 
tion of short sketches, entitled "Camp Fire Stories," in which 
are set forth in a picturesque way the various scenes of army 
life. 

"After Chicago and our old Church," says Mr. Anderson, "my 
principal pastorates were Jamestown, N. Y.; Quincy, 111.; Westminster 
Presbyterian Church, Toledo, Ohio; Columbus, Ohio; Norwalk and 
Danielson, Conn. I have now practically retired from pastoral 
work, though I am preaching at the Washington street Church here 
(Quincy, Mass.), trying to build it up. I am engaged in literary 
work." 

The Rev. Edward Anderson, Minister and soldier of the 
Civil War, now known as "Colonel" Anderson, is still living 
(1913) at Quincy, Mass., on President's Hill. An early remem- 
brance of mine is seeing him come into Calvary Church one 




COLONEL EDWARD ANDERSON. 



CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 49 

Sunday morning (1861), after his appointment as Chaplain 
and conduct the service in his uniform. Our friendship 
commenced at a tumultuous period in the nineteenth century 
and has now progressed well into the twentieth. During 
vacation days (1913), this letter came from him: 

"I am very sorry not to have met you in Boston; 

but maybe it would be tragic to see the difference 

between 1861 and 1913." 

After Mr. Anderson went away, there being no regular 
pulpit supply, it was not uncommon when Sunday morning 
came, and no preacher had been secured, for one of the 
Elders to conduct the services. A member of the pastoral 
committee would often visit the hotels on Saturday to look 
over the registers and thus secure a preacher if possible. 

On October 3, 1862, the Society purchased from Henry 
and Albert Keep, for a consideration of SI, 725, parts of lots 
Ten and Eleven in Greely's Subdivision of Block Twenty-five, 
in the Assessors' Division of the southwest fractional quarter 
of Section Twenty-two, etc., situated at the northeast corner 
of Ringgold place (now Twenty-second street) and Indiana 
avenue; having a frontage of seventy feet on Indiana avenue 
and one hundred and three feet on Twenty-second street.^ 
The Church building was moved to the new location, its 
length increased, and a brick basement constructed, thus 
giving accommodation for the Sunday-school, prayer meet- 
ing room and Minister's study. 

In the meantime, the Rev. James Hewit Trowbridge 
had commenced his labors as third Minister. Mr. Trow- 
bridge was born at Plattsburgh, N. Y., May 27, 1820. He 
was graduated from Middlebury College, Vermont, in 1847, 
and then studied theology at Union Seminary, New York City; 
afterward, in New Haven under Dr. W. W. Taylor, graduat- 
ing in 1850. From 1850 to 1854, Mr. Trowbridge preached in 
North Havershaw, N. Y.; from 1854 to 1856, in Marshall, 
Mich.; from 1856 to 1862, in Dubuque, Iowa. He accepted 
a call to the pastorate of Calvary Presbyterian Church of 
Chicago, in the autumn of 1861, beginning his duties Janu- 
ary 15, 1862, the installation services taking place in March, 

1 The description of these premises and the consideration ($4,500) were incorrect- 
ly stated in the first edition of this work (1900). 



50 A HISTORY OF 

1863. He tendered his resignation in March, 1865, and was 
appointed district Secretary of the New School Committee 
on Home Missions, and continued in this work until 1870, 
when the office was aboHshed at the reunion of the Old and 
New School Churches. His old friend, the Rev. George C. 
Noyes, D. D., says of his further work: "Mr. Trowbridge 
was one of the chief workers in organizing the Presbyterian 
League. He was for a time editor of the Interior, a paper 
which he, more than any other man, was instrumental in 
establishing, and to which he gave the name. He was Min- 
ister of the Church in Riverside from 1873 to 1885. The last 
work of his life was in the Reunion Church (now the Ninth 
Presbyterian). At the request of the Home IMissions Com- 
mittee, he undertook with energy the difficult task of building 
up this Church, which was discouraged by its long struggle 
with debt and disaster. In the midst of these labors, he was 
arrested by the messenger which summoned him to his re- 
ward." Mr. Trowbridge died at Riverside, 111., January 9, 
1887. His widow, Mrs. Alice L. M. Trowbridge, a daughter 
of the late Hon. R. B. Mason, now resides in Chicago. 

It will always be a source of much regret to me that I 
never had the opportunity of meeting the Rev. Edward 
Arthur Pierce, who was the fourth INIinister of Calvary 
Church. During the two years of his pastorate, I was absent 
from Chicago, and did not return until some time after his 
death. Mr. Pierce was born at Woodbury, Conn., Septem- 
ber 15, 1835. Two years later the family removed to Tall- 
madge. Summit County, Ohio. He entered the sophomore 
class of Williams College in 1855, graduating in 1857. After 
a three years' course at the Theological Seminary of East 
Windsor Hill, Conn., he visited Chicago in 1861, and was 
called to the pastorate of Westminster Presbyterian Church, 
where he labored from December, 1861, until November, 
1865. Mr. Pierce was chosen Minister of Calvary Church 
on October 24, of the following year, the installation services 
taking place December 22. In consequence of ill health, Mr. 
Pierce was granted nine months' leave of absence, and on 
December 1, 1867, went south hoping a warmer climate might 
be beneficial. His death occurred February 26, 1868, at 




EinVARD AKTHIK PIERCE. 



CALVARY PRESBYTERIAX CHURCH. 51 

Tallahassee, Florida. His widow, now (1913) Mrs. Emily A. 
Taylor, resides in Philadelphia. 

The communion table and two chairs, with the three 
pulpit chairs in the edifice at Indiana avenue and Twenty- 
first street, were the gift of Mrs. Taylor. 

Some time elapsed before the selection of a new Minister. 
When Mr. Pierce went South in December, 1867, the Rev. 
W. C. Dickinson was appointed pulpit supply. He was so 
greatly beloved by the people that on May 26, 1868, an 
unanimous call was extended to him to become Minister of 
Calvary Church; but he did not think it best to accept.^ 

The Rev. Daniel Lord, D. D., who was at this time in 
charge of the South Congregational Church of Bridgeport, 
Conn., received, April 5, 1869, a formal invitation from Cal- 
varv Church to become its (fifth) Minister. In a letter of 
December 15, 1898, written at Jordansville, Herkimer County, 
N. Y., where his home had then been for eighteen years. Dr. 
Lord has given me some particulars of his life and pastoral 
work: 

"I was born in New York City, April 21, 1S21; entered the sopho- 
more class of the University of Pennsylvania in January, 1842, and 
was graduated from Rutgers College, in 1847. I studied theology in 
the seminary of the Dutch Reformed Church of New Brunswick, X. J. 
In 1864-65, I was a member of the United States Sanitary Commis- 
sion. My pastorates have been with the First Reformed Dutch 
Churches of Piermont, Nyack and Jersey City. While Minister of the 
South Congregational Church of Bridgeport, Conn,, I received in 1S69 
three calls almost simultaneously, from the Third Presbyterian, Ful- 
lerton avenue, and Calvary Presbyterian Churches of Chicago. I ac- 
cepted the call from the latter Church, and was its pastor until the 
absorption of its members by the First Presbyterian Church after the 
great fire of 1871. On giving up my work with Calvary Church, I 
turned to the study of medicine, and was graduated from the Chi- 
cago Medical College in 1873. Later I was appointed physician in 
chief of the South Side Dispensary. I was for a time professor of 
natural sciences in Rockland County Institute. I am now meeting 

1 The Rev. William Cowper Dickinson was bom January 26, 1817, in Longmeadow. 
Mass., and died in Evanston, 111., March 12, 1899. His son, Mr. Clarence Dickinson, 
organist and composer, acquired his musical education in Chicago, later in Europe, 
under Guilmant, Reimann and Mozkowski. Mr. Dickinson was organist and choir- 
master of St. James Episcopal Church, Chicago (1902-09): founder and conductor 
(1906-09) of the Musical .\rts Society; since 1909, organist and choirmaster of the 
Brick Presbyterian Church. N'ew York City, and conductor of the Mendelssohn 
Glee Club. 



52 A HISTORY OF 

a handful of my old friends and neighbors on Sunday morning in a 
little box we call Christ Church. On some accounts, missionary work 
is needed here (Jordansville) as much as in South Africa. I am 
happy with my work and my people." 

Dr. Lord died on Sabbath morning, September 10, 1899, 
in tiis pulpit at Jordansville. He had just finished his ser- 
mon, and was making some announcements, when he was 
stricken with apoplexy, and died in a few moments, without 
regaining conciousness. 

"Dr. Lord possessed the charm and power of extemporaneous 
address, a tender spirituality and a finished culture. So attractive 
was his personality that the distinguished Roman prelate, Arch- 
bishop Ireland, meeting him on shipboard, was so impressed that in 
recording his travels for publication he could not refrain from making 
appreciative mention of his Protestant fellow-traveler. Dr. Lord's 
death was most fitting. It was an ascension from the high places 
of his power and joy."^ 

The steady growth of the Church under its several 
Ministers received such a marked impetus after the Rev. 
Dr. Lord was called to the pastorate, that it was soon evident 
that a larger Church edifice was needed. On June 6, 1870, 
the Trustees of Calvary Church purchased from the Trinity 
M. E. Church, for a consideration of $33,000, the northeast 
corner of Indiana avenue and Twenty-first street, being a part 
of Lots Fifteen and Eighteen, in Block Four, in George Smith's 
Addition to Chicago, having a frontage of ninety-eight feet on 
Indiana avenue and a depth of one hundred and seventy-eight 
feet on Twenty-first street. The premises were at this time 
(1870) occupied by the stone edifice of Trinity Church. Subse- 
quently, the east twenty-three feet of this lot, together with 
the brick house (now 216 E. Twenty-first street) were sold by 
Calvary Church for S5,000. In order to make this new pur- 
chase it was necessary for the Trustees to dispose of the 
former lot and building at the corner of Twenty-second 
street. This property was sold by Calvary Church to Mr. 
Harvey M. Thompson, by deed bearing date August 6, 1870, 
for a consideration of $26,750.- 



1 The Interior, Chicago, September. 1899. 

2 These premises were conveyed by Mr. H. M. Thompson to Messrs. Daniel A. 
Jones and Leonard Hodges by deed dated August 6, 1871. This lot is now a part 
of the site of the present "Hodges Block." 



CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 53 

Preparations for the erection of a new Church were com- 
menced immediately; the old building of Trinity Church was 
taken down, and the new edifice of Calvary Church was be- 
gun under the direction of Mr. J. C. Cochrane/ architect, and 
Mr. James Otis, chairman of the building committee. The 
corner stone was laid in November, 1870. Little or no prog- 
ress was made that winter, but work was resumed in the 
spring, with the expectation that the basement would be 
completed before the autumn and ready for services. In 
the meantime the Society continued to hold services in the 
old frame building at the corner of Twenty-second street. 

Sunday, October 8, and Monday, October 9, 1871, will 
never be forgotten by those who witnessed the terrible scenes 
of the great fire. After the morning service at Calvary 
Church, in company with other members of the Choir, I 
visited the new building at the corner of Twenty-first street. 
The west, north and south walls were completed, but the 
east w^all had not been carried to the finish. The trusses 
supporting the roof were in position and some of the roof 
boards were on, but the interior was filled with scaffolding and 
builders' material. An organ committee had already been 
appointed, consisting of Mr. Henry Wood, Mr. George F. 
Bacon and myself. We had decided on the firm of Messrs. 
Hook & Hastings, of Boston, as the builders, and were then 
considering some plans and specifications they had submit- 
ted. On this Sunday morning, October 8, Mr. Bacon and I 
climbed to the main floor of the building to note the position 
the organ w^as to occupy. We little thought of the tremend- 
ous changes the next few hours would bring about for the 
future of our Church and our city. 

As our Church was closed that evening, I attended serv- 
ice at Grace Episcopal Church. When the Congregation had 
been dismissed and was passing out, every one observed that 
the western sky was flaming red and that a fire was in prog- 
ress. There had been an extensive fire the night before 
(Saturday) in the district of the West Side, filled with lumber 
yards and frame buildings, and some apprehension was felt 

1 Mr. John Crambie Cochrane built the Church of the Messiah, Jefferson Park 
Church, Cook County and Michael Reese Hospitals, and the Iowa and Illinois State 
Capitols. Mr. Cochrane died in Chicago, November 13, 1887. 



54 A HISTORY OF 

on that Sunday as to the consequences which might result 
if another fire should break out in the same locality, but 
no one even dreamed of the awful scenes of desolation we 
were to witness in the morning: Churches, homes, offices, 
banks, warehouses, all in ruins. 

Plymouth Congregational Church (at the corner of Wa- 
bash avenue and Harmon court) and Grace Episcopal Church 
were not in the line of the fire, and thus escaped. But every 
Church between Congress street and Lincoln park was de- 
stroyed, thus entailing enormous losses on religious societies. 

There were at this time (1871) in the district between 
Twenty-second street and the river, four Presbyterian 
Churches — the First, Second, Olivet, and Calvary. Strictly 
speaking, there were but three, as the Second Church had 
already effected a union with the Olivet Church, and had 
held its first service with that Society on the day of the fire. 

The First Presbyterian Church having lost its home, and 
the Calvary Presbyterian Church, with a new building barely 
started, also concluded to consolidate for their mutual in- 
terests. 

Thus four strong organizations, all having large Congre- 
gations in attendance, each doing a great work, were welded 
into two. At the time, it seemed as though these consolida- 
tions meant a great loss to Presbyterian interests. At all 
events, the members of the Presbytery took that view, for 
their consent to the consolidation of the First Church with 
Calvary Church was only granted after long and serious con- 
sideration. 

The affairs of Calvary Church at this time were in such 
a condition that no other course but a union with the First 
Church seemed practicable. The Society had undertaken the 
erection of a costly edifice; the members had suffered heavy 
losses by reason of the fire, and it was evident that the build- 
ing could only be completed by heavily mortgaging the 
property. It was furthermore apparent that the First and 
Second Churches would both be ultimately located in this 
neighborhood, thereby interfering with the future usefulness 
of Calvary Church. What other course but a consolidation 
with the First Church was open to the people of Calvary 



CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 55 

Church? Subsequent events have fully sustained the sound 
judgment and forethought of those who had these interests 
at heart. 

On Sunday afternoon, October 15, the members of the 
old First Church gathered together for worship in Christ 
Reformed Episcopal Church. At a meeting of the mem- 
bers of Calvary Church, held October 17, a committee was 
appointed to confer with the Session of the First Church, 
on the subject of uniting. Its members were Messrs. James 
Otis, Daniel A. Jones, G. S. Ingraham, Henry Wood and 
Joseph N. Barker. At a subsequent meeting Hon. Jesse O. 
Norton was added to the committee. 

At a joint meeting of the committee from Calvary 
Church and the Session of the First Church, held at the 
residence of Mr. George F. Bissell, on Friday evening, Octo- 
ber 27, a basis of union was agreed upon: 

"(1.) The name of the united Church shall be the First Presby- 
terian Church of Chicago, and the present pastor of the First Church, 
Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., shall be the pastor of the united Church 

"(2.) The united Church shall pay to Rev. Daniel Lord, D. D., 
the present pastor of Calvary Church, the sum of Twenty-five Hun- 
dred Dollars (§2,500.00) and Calvary Church shall be allowed to 
divert $2,500 from the amount subscribed towards the building of the 
Church edifice, before making over their personal property to the 
First Church. 

"Or, that in lieu of the above payment of Five Thousand Dollars 
($5,000.00), if Rev. Daniel Lord, D. D., shall so elect, the united 
Churches will pay him a salary of Twenty-five Hundred Dollars 
($2,500.00) per year, for two years, provided he will take charge of 
the Forty-first street Presbyterian Church; Dr. Lord to receive such 
additional salary as said Church may be able to pay. 

"(.3.) That all the property, real and personal, of the two 
Churches shall become the property of the united Church, the First 
Presbyterian Church of Chicago. 

"(4.) That the Churches so united shall proceed to finish the 
edifice now in process of erection on the corner of Indiana avenue 
and Twenty-first street, in accordance with the plans and specifi- 
cations heretofore adopted by Calvary Church, subject to any 
modifications or alterations mutually agreed upon. The expenses of 
such completion to be paid out of any available means now belong- 
ing to the First Church, after having paid the above sum of Twenty- 
five Hundred Dollars (§2,500.00) to Rev. Daniel Lord, D. D., and the 
sum of Seventy-five Hundred Dollars (87,500.00), heretofore borrowed 
by the Calvary Church for use in the construction of said Church. 



56 A HISTORY OF 

"The Trustees of Calvary Church shall convey by proper deed 
of conveyance their real and personal property to the Trustees of the 
First Presbyterian Church, upon the acceptance of this basis of union 
by the two Churches. It is understood in this basis of union that 
the civil existence of the First Church remains uninterrupted. 

"(5.) The Churches shall be united by an act of Presbytery, and 
all arrangements as to Trustees and Session shall be left to future 
consideration and conference." 

This plan of union was adopted by each of the Churches. 

At a meeting of the Session of Calvary Church, held on 
the evening of November 2, the Rev. Daniel Lord, D. D., 
asked the Session to join with him in an application to the 
Presbytery to dissolve the pastoral relations existing between 
the Minister and people of Calvary Church. This request 
was granted. It was also voted that application be made 
to the Presbytery, at its first meeting, to take the necessary 
action for uniting the membership of this Church with that 
of the First Presbyterian Church. Mr. James Otis was ap- 
pointed delegate to this meeting of the Presbytery. 

The Session of the First Church also took action: 

"November 5, 1871. 
"Session of First Presbyterian Church met and appointed Mr. 
Henry E. Seelye,i delegate (Mr. O. D. Ranney, alternate) to the Pres- 
bytery to represent the Session of this Church in the matter of the 
consolidation of the First with the Calvary Presbyterian Church. 

"November 13, 1871. 

"Session met in the basement of Christ Reformed Episcopal 
Church. Present, Messrs. Ranney, Bissell, Hamill and Penfield, of 
the First Church, and Messrs. Wood, Norton and Otis, of the former 
Calvary Church. The pastor being absent, Mr. Bissell acted as 
moderator. 

"Mr. James Otis, as delegate to the Presbytery from the late 
Calvary Church, and Mr. Ranney of the First Church, reported that 
application was duly made to the Presbytery at its meeting on 
Wednesday, November 8, to unite the First and Calvary Presbyterian 
Churches; that the Presbytery voted 'to unite the Churches, and 
appointed Rev. Robert W. Patterson, D. D., Hon. Samuel M. Moore 
and Mr. James Otis a committee to prepare the necessary papers 
for record in the minutes of the Presbytery.' " 



' Mr. Henry E, Seelye was bom in Bethel, Conn., in 1827; came to Chicago in 
1850; was admitted to the bar in 1852 and continued in active practice of general 
law until he retired in 1909. He was for many years an Elder in the First Church, 
died in Evanston, III.. August 17, 1913. aged eighty-six. 



CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 57 

THE CHOIR OF 
CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

In parting with Calvary Church, it may not be uninter- 
esting to cast a glance at the musical part of the service 
before its consolidation with the First Church. 

In the record of one of the first meetings of the Society, 
I find the first allusion to music: 

"Mr. James Otis, having been appointed a committee 
on hymn books, reported in favor of the collection known 
as the 'Church Psalmist.' " 

While the services were held in the Orphan Asylum, the 
music was of the plainest character. Some one played the 
melodeon, a few singers gathered about the player and sang 
a number of simple hymns; that was all. 

Our first Choir, a volunteer chorus, was organized dur- 
ing the summer of ISGO by Prof. Ebell, who kept a photo- 
graph gallery on Ringgold place during the week, and on 
Sunday played the melodeon and sang tenor. He was born 
in the East Indies, of American parentage; a tall slender 
man, with swarthy complexion and jet black hair. As I 
think of him now, I am reminded of the East Indians who 
haunted the Midway Plaisance at the World's Fair. After- 
ward, he attended the old University of Chicago. Here he 
organized a singing class, of which I was a member, and 
later he studied for the ministry. 

Prof. Ebell was succeeded by Mr. James Murray (B.), 
an old time singing school teacher of the most pronounced 
type, who hailed from Hornellsville, N. Y. He had a voice 
of great depth and power and could "roar you like a lion." 
It was interesting to watch this veteran Choir leader. Be- 
fore service, he would marshal his forces for action, reviewing 
them as they filed by to the Choir gallery, as Samuel re- 
viewed the sons of Jesse. When the Choir arose to sing, in- 
stead of taking his position in front, as had been the custom, 
he stood behind, that he might keep each one up to his or 
her work, admonishing the delinquents by short roars as the 
hymn progressed — "not so much organ" — "a little more 
alto" — "softer" — "louder," all the time singing right on, 
never once taking his eyes from his hymn book. He had 
charge of the music for about a year, and we then fell in line 



58 A HISTORY OF 

with the down town Churches and talked of a quartette. We 
were inspired to this course by the presence at a Sunday 
evening service of two members of a city Choir, who came 
out to help us. Their singing was so acceptable that one of 
them, Mr. J. B. Sutton (B.), was prevailed upon to organize 
a quartette for our Church. This was soon after the Rev. 
James H. Trowbridge began his ministry in 1862. Mr. 
Sutton was a good singer and leader, but the other members 
of the Choir were not at all satisfactory, so this arrangement 
did not last long. 

Our next leader. Dr. Warren N. Dunham (T.), who led 
the Choir at the dedication of the "Brick Church" (First 
Presbyterian), in September, 1849, organized a quartette 
May 1, 1863. Its members were Miss Sarah E. Sanger (S.), 
Mrs. Strong (A.), and Mr. Mohte (B.). Miss Anna Cornwell 
Strickland,^ a niece of Prof. Alonzo J. Sawyer, played the 
melodeon. 

Dr. Dunham resigned May 1, 1864, and was succeeded 
by Mr. E. M. Booth (B.),- who led the Choir until May 1, 
1866, assisted at various times during these two years by 
Mrs. Sampson (S.), Miss Scott (S.), Miss Sarah E. Sanger^ 
(S.), Miss Richards (A.), the Misses Turner (S. and A.), and 
Miss Strickland (O.). Mr. Philo A. Otis (T.), 1864-65. 

The members of Calvary Church Choir during the years 
1866, 1867 and 1868 are all mentioned in the Treasurer's 
ledger, as follows: 

May 1, 1866— Miss Mae French (S.), Miss Lizzie Allen (A.), 
Dr. Lucian A. Clarke (T.) and Mr. Frank A. Bowen 
(B.). The position of organist was filled by various 
people during the year. 



1 Miss Strickland now (1913) resides in New Britain, Conn. 

2 Mr. E. M. Booth came to Chicago in 1863; formed classes in elocution in the 
old University of Chicago and in Dearborn Seminarj'. He had a class in the edifice 
of the First Church, when it stood on Wabash avenue at Congress street, of which 
Dr. Humphrey, Dr. Eddy (of the M. E. Church) and other Ministers were members. 
Mr. Booth was an early member of the Apollo Musical Club. He resides in Chicago 
and since 1890 has been professor of elocution in the McCormick Theological Sem- 
inary. He is an Elder in the Church of the Covenant. 

5 Miss Sarah E. Sanger was married December 3, 1868, to Mr. William P. Butler, 
and later they moved to Syracuse, N. Y., where Mrs. Butler died May 5, 1896. Her 
aunt, Mrs. Charles Wheeler, an old member of this Church, gave me the data about 
this "sweet singer, who had a voice full of music." 




GEORGE FRAN-CIS BACOX. 



CALVARY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 59 

During the year 1SG6 a two-manual cabinet organ 
(Mason & Hamlin) was purchased at a cost of $475. This 
cabinet organ is now (1913) in the prayer meeting room of the 
First Church in its new home at Forty-first street. 

May 1, 1867— Miss Mae French (S.), Miss Lewis (A.), Dr. 
Lucian A. Clarke (T.), Mr. Frank A. Bowen (B.) and 
Miss Emma Lander (O.). 

May 1, 18GS— Miss Mae French (S.), Miss Hubbard (A.), Dr. 
Lucian A. Clarke (T.), succeeded by Mr. A. B. Stiles/ 
Mr. Frank A. Bowen^ (B.), Miss Lander (O.), succeeded 
by Miss Weeks. 

May 1, 1869— Miss Mae French (S.), Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Slayton (T. and A.), Mr. A. L. Goldsmith (B.), Mr. J. 
H. Hansen (O.), succeeded by Mr. George F. Bacon. 

May 1, 1870— Miss Mae French (S.), Miss Fowler (A.) for 
portion of the year, Mr. Philo A. Otis (T.), Mr. A. L. 
Goldsmith (B.), succeeded by Mr. E. S. Evarts, Mr. 
George F. Bacon (O.). 

May 1, 1871— Miss Mae French (S.), Miss Hawkes (A.), Mr. 
Philo A. Otis (T.), Mr. E. S. Evarts (B.) and Mr. George 
F. Bacon (O.). This was the personnel of the Choir at 
the morning service on the day of the great fire, Octo- 
ber 8. 1871. 



1 Deceased. He was a brother of General I. N. Stiles. 

2 Mr. Bowen remained in the Choir until 1869, and was succeeded by Mr. A. L. 
Goldsmith. Mr. Bowen now (1900) resides in London. England. 



60 THE UNITED CHURCHES. 

THE UNITED CHURCHES 

HEREAFTER KNOWN AS 

THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

All the formalities regarding the union of the two 
Churches having been duly arranged, the people of Calvary 
Church worshipped with the people of the First Church for 
the first time on Sunday afternoon, November 5, 1871, in 
Christ Reformed Episcopal Church. The united Churches, 
or First Church, as they will hereafter be called, continued to 
hold services with the Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., as Min- 
ister, in Christ Church until February, 1872, when a change 
was made to the Immanuel Baptist Church. 

The lecture room of the present edifice was completed 
about the end of April, 1872, and here the newly consolidated 
Church at last found a permanent home. 

In following the history of the First Church from this 
time, I have relied mainly on the Choir Journal, which I 
instituted in 1875, and in which, besides an account of the 
work of the Choir, most of the events of interest to the mem- 
bers of the Church, were noted down. 

In arranging the details of the union, it was agreed that 
the Choir of Calvary Church should be retained: Miss Mae 
French (S.), afterward Mrs. W. H. Aldrich, Miss Hawkes 
(A.), Mr. Philo A. Otis (T.), and Mr. E. S. Evarts (B.).* 
Miss Hawkes resigned soon after the union of the Churches 
and was succeeded by Mrs. Oliver K. Johnson, who continued 
with the Choir until May 1, 1872. 

The announcement of the death of Gen. Joseph B. 
Leake, June 1, 1913, as this work was about to go to press, 
brings to my mind two Old Folks' Concerts, April 1 and 2, 
1872, in which he assisted our Choir as a member (flute) of 
the orchestra. These concerts were given in the First Bap- 
tist Church (then on Wabash avenue at Hubbard court) by 
the ladies of the First Presbyterian Church (Mrs. E. V. Rob- 
bins, Chairman), for the benefit of the fund for furnishing 
the new First Church. The program consisted of old-time 

' Mr. Evarts now (1913) resides in Chicago, and is a member of the law firm 
of Munday, Evarts, AUcock & Clarke. 




THE FIRST I'RHSHVTKRIA.N CHIRCH 
Indiana Aveniit- and T\M-ntv I'irst Street 



HOOK & HASTINGS ORGAN. 61 

songs and anthems (sung in costume) for solo voices, chorus 
and orchestra. Mr. J. A. Butterfield conducted and was 
assisted by the members of the Choir of the First Church, 
and Messrs. Thomas G. Goodwillie and James Gill, as solo- 
ists. Gen. Leake was a veteran of the Civil War, and at the 
time of his death was the oldest practicing attorney in Chi- 
cago. 

The Choir and Congregation suffered a great loss in the 
death of Mr. George F. Bacon, our organist, who was killed 
December 5, 1872, in an accident on the Pennsylvania R. R., 
at Mifflin, Pa. 

Mr. Bacon^ was succeeded by Mr. Henry Fuller,- who 
continued with the Choir until his death in September of 
the following year. 

On May 1, 1872, some changes took place in the Choir; 
Mrs. Oliver K. Johnson (A.) was succeeded by Miss Antoi- 
nette French and Mr. E. S. Evarts (B.) by Mr. A. L. Gold- 
smith. 

By the terms of the contract, the organ was to be com- 
pleted in November, 1872. Messrs. Hook & Hastings of 
Boston, the builders, were ready at the time specified, but 
the Church was not ready. Finally, the organ was brought 
to Chicago and kept in storage for at least two months before 
the main audience room was completed.^ The organ has 



1 Mr. George Francis Bacon was born December 13, 1839, in Genesee. N.V. When 
quite a young man, he removed to Galesburg, 111., where he was an organist for a few 
years. He then came to Chicago, and was associated with the firm of Root & Cady 
for two years. Afterward, he removed to Peoria, 111., where for seven years he 
was organist of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. In 1868, he came to Chicago and was 
organist of Calvary Presbyterian Church and later of the First Church until his death 
December 5, 1872. In November, 1865, Mr. Bacon married Emma Raymond, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Louis Raymond of Chicago. She died a year later. On October 
15, 1868, he married Mary Myrick, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Willard F. Myrick of 
Chicago. Mr. Bacon, at the time of his death, was a member of the firm of Knowles, 
Birdsell & Bacon, tea and coffee merchants. He was received into the membership 
of this Church, July 1. 1870. His brother, Mr. Henr>' M. Bacon, was for many years 
an officer in the First Church. 

- In 1864-65. Mr. Fuller was organist of Trinity Episcopal Church, then on Jack- 
son street; the present site of the Illinois Theatre. Afterward, he was with the New 
England Congregational Church. Mr. Fuller was connected with the firm of Shortall 
& Hoard, abstract makers. His death occurred September 24, 1873, at Mercy Hos- 
pital, in Chicago. 

3 The organ was set up under the direction of Mr. George S. Hutchings, Super- 
intendent of the Hook & Hastings factor>-. In 1901 he organized the Hutchings- 
Votey Organ Company. Mr. Hutchings died June 1, 1913, in Boston. 



62 DEDICATION COXCERT. 

three manuals and forty-six speaking stops; its cost was 
about $9,000. The instrument will be removed in the sum- 
mer of 1913 to the new home of the First Church, at Grand 
Boulevard and Forty-first street. 

The new edifice of the First Church was formally opened 
February 6, 1873, with a concert under the direction of Mr. 
G. C. Knopfel, the western agent of the organ builders. Mr. 
Knopf el was assisted by : The Choir of the First Presbyterian 
Church; Mrs. W. H. Aldrich (S.), Miss Antoinette French 
(A.),i Mr. Philo A. Otis (T.) and Mr. A. L. Goldsmith (B.)^; 

The Choir of the Second Presbyterian Church; Mrs J. A. 
Farwell (S.), Mrs. O. K. Johnson (A.) (in place of their regu- 
lar alto, Mrs. J. A. Balfour, who was ill), Mr. Robert T. 
Howard (T.) and Mr. John M. Hubbard (B.); 

The Choir of the Fourth Presbyterian Church; Mrs. O. L. 
Fox (S.), Mrs. A. R. Sabin (A.), Captain A. R. Sabin (T.)^ 
and Mr. William Sprague (B.); 

Messrs. Louis Falk, I. V. Flagler and Henry Fuller, 

organists; Miss Eva Manierre and Mr. N. Ledochowski, 

pianists; Mr. Lyon* (harp), Mr. Sir (violin), Mr. Bareither 

(flute), and Mr. Bachmann (violoncello). 

Part I. 

1 — Opening of the Organ _ _ - Mr. G. C. Knopfel 

a. Selections. 

b. "Offertoire," Op. 22, _ _ - - Batiste 
2 — Anthem, "Benedic Aninia" ----- Buck 

Choir of the First Presbyterian Church. 
3 — Solo, "Angels, Ever Bright and Fair" - - - Handel 

Mrs. O. L. Fox. 

4 — Sextette, "A Tear Shed at the Grave of Rossini" Ciardi 

Organ, piano, harp, violoncello, violin and flute. 

1 Miss Antoinette French, afterward wife of Mr. Frank S. Osbom, died October 
30, 1897. 

2 Mr. Goldsmith resigned May 1, 1870, going to the Choir of Olivet Presbyterian 
Church. He returned to his old position in the First Church, May 1, 1872, remaining 
until 1874. From 1874, until May 1, 1901, he was in the Choir of the Third Presby- 
terian Church. Mr. Goldsmith has been for many years manager of the Merchants' 
Loan and Trust Safety Deposit Company (1913). 

' Captain Albert R. Sabin (T.). after serving two years with the Ninth Vermont 
Regiment in the war, came to Chicago in 1863, and entered the public school service. 
He sang in the Choir of the Second Presbyterian Church (1863); Church of the Mes- 
siah (1871); later with the Fourth Presbyterian. At the time of his death, he was 
principal of the Medill High School. Captain Sabin was bom September 30, 1837, in 
Rockingham, Vt.; died Januarj- 29, 1913, in Chicago. 

* Mr. George W. Lyon came to Chicago in the "sixties"; founded the firm of Lyon 
& Healy in 1864. Mr. Lyon understood the technique of even,- instrument used in 
band and orchestra. His death occurred January 19. 1894, in Chicago. 



DEDICATION CONCERT. 63 

5 — Quartette, "Volkslied" ----- Krehs 

Choir of the Second Presbyterian Church. 
6— Organ Solo, "Variations on a Scotch Air" - - Buck 

Mr. Louis Falk. 

7 — Soprano Solo, "The Message" - - Blumenthal 

Mrs. W. H. Aldrich. 

Part II. 

1 — Anthem, "Gloria in Excelsis" - - - _ Knopfol 

By the Choirs of the First, Second and Fourth 

Presbyterian Churches. 

2 — Grand Duo for two pianos and organ obligate 

---------- Lysberg 

3 — Anthem, "Venite" ------- Buck 

Choir of the Second Presbyterian Church. 

4 — Organ Solos, a. Transcription, "Robin Adair" Flagler 

b. Prelude in B Minor - - _ Bach 

Mr. I. V. Flagler. 

5 — Trio, "Lift Thine Eyes" - - - - Mendelssohn 

6 — "Miserere," ("II Trovatore") ----- Verdi 

Piano, organ, violin and violoncello. 
7 — Organ Solo, "Festival March" - - _ Zundel 

Mr. Knopfel. 

Mr. Benjamin B. Owen^ was organist for a short time after- 
ward in the absence of Mr. Fuller. The organists after Mr. 
Fuller's death (September, 1873), were Mr. Emil Liebling- 
until May, 1874, and Mr. William H. Cutler until October, 
1874. 

In May, 1873, I tendered my resignation as a member 
of the Choir, expecting to be absent from the city for a year 
or more, and was succeeded by Mr. James GilP (T.), who had 
charge of the Choir until May 1, 1874. Mrs. Aldrich (S.) and 
Miss French (A.), resigned in February, 1873. 



A notable event in the history of the Presbyterian 
Church occurred in May, 1874, the trial of the Rev. David 

' Mr. Benjamin Bloomfield Owen was bom in Stockholm, Sweden, October 18, 
1830. He came to New York City, August 24, 1859, having worked his passage across 
the ocean as a common sailor. Here he was introduced to Jenny Lind by Mr. Max 
Hjortsberg, Owen's adopted brother, who afterward came to Chicago. With the as- 
sistance of Jenny Lind, Owen studied music under the best instructors in New York 
City. In 1863, he married Miss Kate Osbom, a daughter of the late Judge Osbom, of 
La Porte, Indiana, and a grand-niece of the Rev. Brainerd Kent, our "Father Kent," 
who founded Railroad Chapel. Mr. Owen was organist of Christ Episcopal Church of 
Indianapolis, Sixth Street Synagogue of St. Louis, Plymouth Congregational and 
Trinity Episcopal Churches of Chicago. Among his best works are the anthems, 
"Hear Us, O Father" ("Church and Home" collection), and the "Ave Maria," for so- 
prano solo and chorus. Mr. Owen died at Champion, Michigan, July 17, 1889. 

2 Mr. Emil Liebling, well known as concert pianist, composer and lecturer, has 
lived in Chicago since 1872. 

3 Mr. James Gill, concert singer and teacher, came to Chicago in 1S71; died Feb- 
ruary 4, 1910. 



64 TRIAL OF THE REV. DAVID SWING. 

Swing/ Minister of the Fourth Presbyterian Church of Chi- 
cago, on charges of heresy, preferred by the Rev. Francis 
L. Patton, D. D., then a young man about thirty years 
of age, who had recently come to Chicago as Professor in the 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary of the Northwest (now 
known as the McCormick Theological Seminary). Nothing 
of so great religious importance had happened in this country 
since the trial of Albert Barnes on similar charges in May, 
1835, before the General Assembly at Pittsburgh. 

The case was heard by the Chicago Presbytery, of which 
the Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., was Moderator, in the lecture 
room of the First Presbyterian Church. There were two 
charges named by Professor Patton: 

"1. Rev. David Swing, being a minister of the Presby- 
terian Church, in the United States of America, and a mem- 
ber of the Presbytery of Chicago, has not been zealous and 
faithful in maintaining the truths of the Gospel, and has not 
been faithful and diligent in the exercise of the public duties 
of his ofhce as such Minister. 

2, Rev. David Swing, being a Minister of the Presby- 
terian Church, in the United States of America, and a mem- 
ber of the Presbytery of Chicago, does not sincerely receive 
and adopt the Confession of Faith, as containing the system 
of doctrine taught in the Holy Scriptures." 

Professor Patton's argument occupied three days, morn- 
ing and afternoon, and was a masterly exposition of the 
fundamental doctrines of the Christian Creed, giving the 
history of each doctrine and its relation to the whole system 
of theology. 

The outcome of this trial, in which Professor Swing had 
the sympathies of the First Church and the public generally, 
resulted in a great victory for him, when the Presbytery on 
May 20, reached a decision. Only fifteen of the sixty-one 
members voted to sustain the first charge, and thirteen to 
sustain the second. 

The Chicago Tribune of October 3, 1874, in comment- 
ing on this trial, said: 

"Professor Swing's argument in his own defense, ex- 
plaining his objectionable words and indicating his general 

^ The Rev. David Swing was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, August 23, 1830, and died 
in Chicago, October 3, 1S94. 



MEMBERS OF THE CHOIR G5 

conformity to the Presbyterian standards, while exercising 
his inalienable right of private judgment in interpreting both 
the church standards and the Scriptures, were masterly 
efforts, and displayed a degree of coolness, good nature, 
self -poise, logic and satire rarely excelled in similar cases." 
Dr. Patton appealed from this decision to the Synod of 
Illinois, and the verdict was reversed. The trial resulted in 
Professor Swing withdrawing from the Presbyterian Church 
and organizing Central Church, with which he was associated 
until his death. The Rev. George C. Noyes, D. D., of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Evanston, was counsel for Professor 
Swing. 

Among the sopranos following Mrs. Aldrich until May 1, 

1874, were Mrs. F. A. Thomas, Miss Jessica Haskell and Mrs. 
John Schmahl; Miss French (A.) was succeeded by Miss Ella 
White (afterward Mrs. JacobR. Custer). From Julyuntil Novem- 
ber, 1874, Mr. P. P. Bliss, ^ the evangelist, acted as precentor. 
A new Choir was organized in December, 1874, with: 

Miss Jessica Haskell (S.), soloist at the first concert of 
the Apollo Musical Club, January 21st, 1873. Miss Haskell 
went abroad in August, 1875, to study, returning to the Choir 
in February, 1876, and retired from the Choir upon her mar- 
riage in June, 1876, to Mr. Edward Fuller. 

Miss Haskell was succeeded by ]\Iiss Fanny Whitney 
who sang until September 10, 1876. 

Mrs. Oliver K. Johnson (A.), formerly Miss Louisa Whit- 
lock, made her first appearance in the performance of Ros- 
sini's "Stabat Mater" by the Musical Union in 1865; soloist 
at the second concert of the Apollo Musical Club, February 
25, 1873; sang in various concerts of the Beethoven Society 
in 1874-76, notably in Max Bruch's "Lay of the Bell" in 
1879; retired from the Choir, January 1, 1886. 

Mr. Philo Adams Otis (T.). 

Mr. Charles Towner Root (B.); resigned October 31, 

1875, and for many years has lived in New York City as 
President of the Root Newspaper Association. He was suc- 
ceeded on January 2, 1876, by Mr. John Maynard Hubbard. 

Mr. Charles Arthur Havens (O.), was born in Essex, 
Essex County, N. Y., in 1842. After a course of study in 
Boston, he was called in 1865 to the position in the Second 

1 Mr. Philip Paul Bliss lost his life in an accident on the Lake Shore R. R., at 
Ashtabula, Ohio, December 29, 1876. He was bom in Clearfield County, Pa., July 
9. 1838. 



66 FROM 1S74 TO 1S86. 

Presbyterian Church, Chicago, remaining there for several 
years. He was next engaged at the First Baptist Church, 
and came to the First Presbyterian in October, 1874. He 
resigned from the First Presbyterian in October, 1875, to fill 
a three months' engagement at St. James Episcopal Church, 
returning to the First Church, January 9, 1876, where he 
remained until January 12, 1879, and was succeeded by Mr. 
Clarence Eddy. From 1882 until 1890, he was again with 
the Second Presbyterian Church, returning to the First Bap- 
tist Church, where he is now (1913) engaged. 

Among those who served at various times, in the absence 
of the regular members of the Choir were: Miss Brewster, 
soprano; Mrs. Frederick Ullmann and Mrs George P. Upton, 
altos; Mr. L. Fish and Mr. Charles M. Smith, tenors; Mr. 
Freeman and two members of the "Quaker City Quartette," 
Messrs. Holmes and Noble, basses. 

Here may be noted a concert in the First Presbyterian 
Church on Monday evening, February 22, 1875, by the 
united Choirs of the First and Second Presbyterian Churches, 
assisted by Miss Eva IManierre,^ pianist, Messrs. Daniel N. 
Hood and C. A. Havens, organists. 

Other changes which took place in the membership of the 
Choir prior to January 1, 1886, when my active connection 
with the Choir ceased, were: 

Sopranos: Miss Crocker, from September, 1876, to Jan- 
uary 1, 1877; Miss Fanny Whitney (afterward Mrs. E. F. 
Gorton) from February 18, 1877, to January 1, 1881; Miss 
Esther Butler from January 1, 1881, to May 20, 1883; Mrs. 
John C. Buckbee from May 20, 1883, to January 1, 1886. 

During the three months' absence of Mr. Havens, from 
October, 1875, to January 2, 1876, with the St. James Episco- 
pal Church, his place w^as filled by Mr. Dyer, Mr. Samuel C. 
Moore, and Mr. Frederick W. Root.- 

Mr. Clarence Eddy succeeded Mr. Havens, beginning his 
duties January 12, 1879, remaining until May 1, 1895, a 
period of more than sixteen years — longer than the pastorate 
of any Minister of the Church. 

Other extracts from the Choir Journals will now be given 
in chronological order (1876-1912), which, as they touch on 
many interesting items pertaining to the Church at large, 
will be assigned a chapter by themselves. 

• Miss Eva Manieire, afterward Mrs. George E. Dawson. 

' Mr. Frederick W. Root, nephew of Dr. George F. Root, is a well-known teacher 
of voice, composer and lecturer; now (1913) resides in Chicago. 




CHAKLHS ARTHIR H.WHN^ 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 67 



PULPIT AND CHOIR 

The names by which our Orchestra is designated in this 
work are all identical. "The Chicago Orchestra" (1891) be- 
came "The Theodore Thomas Orchestra" (1905), and is now 
(1913) "The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, founded by Theo- 
dore Thomas." 

1876 
June 19 — Funeral services of Mr. Alexander Murison, con- 
ducted by Dr. Mitchell, with -the assistance of the Church 
Choir. 

Mr. Murison was born at Aberdeen, Scotland, October 
20, 1827; died in Rome. Italy, March 14, 1876. 

1877 

January 21 — A Sunday afternoon service was commenced 
today at four o'clock. 

May 13 — Dr. Mitchell, having received six months' leave of 
absence, has gone to Europe. Dr. Taylor in the pulpit 
today. 

There was no regular pulpit supply during Dr. Mitchell's 
absence. The Journal says that Dr. Eels of Cleveland, 
preached May 27; Dr. Simpson of Louisville, Ky., June 10th; 
the Rev. W. M. Blackburn, D. D., of the Presbyterian Theo- 
logical Seminary of the Northwest, July 1; and the Rev. 
Joseph Cook, July 15. The afternoon service was discon- 
tinued after July 1. 

November 4 — Dr. Mitchell home from Europe; in the pulpit 
today. 

November 18 — The sum of S3 1,000 was secured this morning 
toward the debt on the Church. 

December 16 — Balance of Church debt $15,000, subscribed. 

1878 

May 26— 

Anthem — "Jubilate in E Flat" - - - S. P. Warren 
Offertory — For Railroad Chapel; S-lr,500 subscribed. 

June 30 — Choir assisted by Mrs. Jenny T. Kempton (A.) 
Anthem — "Thou Earth, Waft Sweet Incense" - Spohr 

Miss Whitney and quartette. 
Offertory — "Seek Ye the Lord" - - _ _ Roberts 



68 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Mrs. Jenny Twitchell Kempton, who assisted the Choir 
on this and other occasions, was a notable singer in her day. 
Her first important engagement was with "Father Kemp's 
Old Folks' Concert Company," traveling with them for sev- 
eral years before the war. In 1863-64, she sang with the 
"Richings-Bernard Opera Company" in San Francisco, and 
on her return to Boston, appeared with the Handel and 
Haydn Society in their "Semi-Centennial Celebration," in 
May, 1865. She then went abroad, studying in Paris and 
Italy, singing one season in opera at "La Scala" in Milan; 
afterward in Paris and England. On her return to America, 
she traveled with Parepa-Rosa in concert and opera. In 
1878, she made her home in Chicago, where she resided sev- 
eral years, as concert singer and teacher, Mrs. Kempton 
now (1913) resides in Los Angeles, Cal. 

October 27 — Sunday afternoon; funeral services of Mr. Au- 
gustus G. Downs, conducted by Dr. Mitchell and Dr. 
Bascom, assisted by the Choir. 
November 3 — Historical sermon by Dr. Mitchell, "And thou 
shalt remember all the way which the Lord thy God led 
thee these forty years." (Deut. viii: 2.) 
Dr. Mitchell said that Chicago in 1833 consisted of about 
300 settlers, most of them driven here for protection on 
account of the Blackhawk war. This sermon was afterward 
published under the title of: "The Church on the Frontier." 

1879 

January 12 — Mr. Eddy's first service in the Church: 

Prelude — "Communion in E" _ _ _ Saint-Saens 

Postlude — "Marche Religieuse" - - - Guilmant 

January 19 — 

Offertory — "Palm Branches" - - - _ _ Faure 
Mr. \V. T. Carleton. 

March 23 — The Rev. Francis L. Patton, D. D., occupied the 
pulpit this morning; a great sermon. 

November 28— Funeral services of Mr. Solomon A. Smith, 
held at the Church, conducted by Dr. Mitchell, with the 
assistance of the Choir. Mr. Eddy played the "Funeral 
March" of Chopin at the conclusion of the services. In 
the course of an impressive sermon on the text, "How 
are the mighty fallen" (II Sam. i: 19), Dr. Mitchell said 
of Mr. Smith: "He was known amongst all this com- 




CI.AKHNCH i;i)DV. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 69 

munity, and through the Northwest as one of the most 
upright, able, conservative and reliable men of business 
with which this city was ever blessed; a man who held 
as a sacred and inviolate trust everything that was com- 
mitted into his hands." The pallbearers were Messrs. 
George Armour, Marshall Field, E. Blackman, A. H. 
Burley, E. T. Watkins, John Tyrell, Jerome Beecher and 
John B. Drake. 

Mr. Byron L. Smith, son of Mr. Solomon A. Smith, was for 
some years a member of the Board of Trustees of this Church, 
and was a member (1912) of the Joint Committee which 
brought about the union of the First and Forty-First street 
Presbyterian Churches. He is President of the Northern 
Trust Company, of Chicago. 

December 28— Christmas Celebration; Mrs. Clifford Wil- 
liams (S.) assisted. 

Prelude — "Offertory on Two Christmas Hymns" Guilmant 
Anthem— "Behold the Days Come" - - - Otis 

Anthem — "Sing, O Heavens" - - - - Tours 

Postlude— "The Hallelujah Chorus" - - - Handel 

Mr. Eddy. 

1880 

March 14— Mr. Harrison M. Wild,^ (O.) in the absence of 
Mr. Eddy. 
Prelude — "Second Movement" from "Sonata in G Minor" 

____--_--- Merkel 

Postlude— "St. Ann's Fugue" _ _ - - Bach 

May 2— Annual offering for Railroad Chapel; $4,700, sub- 
scribed. 

August 8 — Dr. Mitchell announced his decision to accept the 
call from the First Presbyterian Church of Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

August 29— Sermon by the Rev. Z. M. Humphrey, D. D. 

October 3— Sermon by the Rev. Robert W. Patterson, D. D. 

October 17 — Dr. Mitchell occupied the pulpit today for the 
last time, preaching from the text: "Only let your 
conversation be as it becometh the Gospel of Christ; 
that whether I come and see you or else be absent, I 
may hear of your affairs, that ye stand fast in one spirit, 
with one mind striving together for the faith of the 
Gospel." (Phill. i: 27.) 

1 Mr. Wild came to Chicago from Hoboken, N. Y., in 1864; studied organ and 
piano with Messrs. Creswold, Eddy and LiebHng; organist and choirmaster of Grace 
Episcopal Church since 1879; conductor of the Apollo Musical Club since September, 
1898: conductor (1913) of the Mendelssohn Club. 



70 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

November 14 — Sermon by the Rev. Mr. Burnham, of Fall 
River, Mass.; text, "Bear ye one another's burdens, and 
so fulfill the law of Christ." (Galatians vi: 2.) 

December 26 — Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude — "Offertoire" _ _ _ _ - Guilmant 

Anthem— "O Zion, that Tellest" - _ - Buck 

Anthem — "Sing, O Heavens" _ - - - Tours 

Postlude — "The Hallelujah Chorus" - - - Handel 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. W. H. Aldrich and 
Miss Adele McCord, sopranos; Mrs. J. T. Kempton and 
Mrs. J. R. Custer, altos; Mr. Charles M. Smith and Mr. 
John Rattenbury, tenors; Mr. Charles S. Lee and Mr. 
J. S. Moore, basses; Mr. Clarence Eddy, (O.). 

A Christmas sermon was delivered by Prof. Franklin 
W. Fisk, D. D., who supplied the pulpit for a year or more 
after Dr. Mitchell's departure. 

1881 

January 16 — Pulpit occupied by the Rev. Edward H. 
Curtis, son of the Rev. Harvey Curtis, D. D., Minister 
of this Church from 1850 to 1858. Text: "But without 
a parable spake He not unto them; and when they were 
alone, He expounded all things to His disciples." (St. 
Markiv: 34.) 

March 13 — 

Prelude — "First and Second Movements," Sonata, Op. 119, 
---------- Merkel 

Anthem — "Magnificat in B Flat" - _ _ Stanford 

Offertory — "O Come, Every One That Thirsteth," 

--------- Mendelssohn 

Postlude — "Last Movement," Sonata, Op. 119, Merkel 

April 17 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude — "Overture" to "The Messiah" - - Handel 

Anthem — "This Is the Day" - _ _ _ Qtis 

Anthem — "God Hath Appointed a Day" - - Tours 

Anthem — "King, All Glorious" - - - - Barnby 

Postlude — Finale, "Paschal Sonata" - - - Lemmens 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks, Mrs. 
W. H. Aldrich and Mrs. L. M. Prentiss, sopranos; Mrs. 
J. A. Balfour^ and Miss Alice Coffey, altos; Mr. John 
Rattenbury and Mr. C. E. Leech, tenors; Mr. Charles S. 
Lee, Mr. W. L. Mason and Mr. J. S. Moore, basses; 
Mr. Clarence Eddy (O.). 

' Mrs. Balfour now (1913) resides in Los Angeles, California. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 71 

Prof. Fisk delivered an Easter sermon; text, "But when the 

young man heard that saying, he went away sorrowful; 

for he had great possessions." (St. Matt, xix: 22.) 
The Rev. Charles M. Morton made an address in behalf of 

Railroad Chapel; $4,800, subscribed. 
July 10 — All the selections from the works of Mr. Frederic 

Grant Gleason.^ 

Prelude — Vorspiel, "Otho Visconti" 

Anthem — "Gloria in Excelsis, E Flat" 

Offertory — "Cast Thy Burden on the Lord" (from the Can- 
tata, "God, Our Deliverer") 

Postlude — "Overture Triomphale, Op. IL" 

July 24 — Sermon by Prof. Fisk; text, "All unrighteousness 
is sin; and there is a sin not unto death." (I John v: 17.) 

July 31 — Announcement was made from the pulpit that a 
call had been extended to the Rev. John H. Barrows, of 
East Boston, Mass., and that he would preach in this 
Church on August 14. Sermon by the Rev. Henry 
Montgomery of Belfast, Ireland; text, "Therefore being 
justified by faith, we have peace with God, through our 
Lord Jesus Christ." (Romans v. 1.) 

August 7 — Sermon by the Rev. Z. M. Humphrey, D. D. 

August 14 — Mr. Barrows in the pulpit, preaching from the 
text, "God is a Spirit; and they that worship Him must 
worship Him in spirit and in truth." (St. John iv: 24.) 

Mr. A. F. McCarrell, of Grace Episcopal Church, organist in 
the absence of Mr. Eddy. 

Prelude — "Andante in E Minor, No. 3" - - Smart 

Anthem — "The Strain Upraise" - - - - Buck 

Anthem — "Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord" - Garrett 

Postlude — "Triumphal March," ("Naaman") - Costa 

At the evening service, Mr. Barrows preached from the 
text: "Pilate saith unto Him, what is truth?" (St. John 
xviii:38.) 

The Choir selections were: 

Prelude — "Second Sonata, Op. 42, No. 2" - Merkel 

Anthem — "O Give Thanks unto the Lord" \Vm. Jackson 
Anthem — "God Is a Spirit" _ _ _ _ Bennett 

Postlude — "Op. 100, No. 4" _ _ - - Merkel 

November 6 — Mr. Barrows began his labors today as the 
sixth Minister of the Church, preaching from the text: 
"I am the Light of the world." (St. John viii: 12.) 

' Mr. Gleason was born December 17, 1848, in Middletown, Conn.; came to Chi- 
cago in 1877, as teacher of musical theory in the Hershey School of Music. His prin- 
cipal works are the operas. "Montezuma," and "Otho Visconti," and the "Festival 
Ode," written for the opening of the Auditorium, December 9, 1889. Mr. Gleason died 
December 6, 1903, in Chicago. 



72 PULPIT AXD CHOIR. 

November 17 — Thursday, P. M., funeral services of the Rev. 
Zephaniah Moore Humphrey, D. D., the fourth Min- 
ister of the Church, at the residence of Mr. C. M. Hender- 
son, conducted by the Rev. John H. Barrows, with the 
assistance of members of the Choir, 

December 4 — An evening service was commenced today, to 
be continued throughout the winter months. Printed 
programmes of the order of service distributed through 
the pews, for the first time in the history of the Church. 

December 8 — Thursday evening. Installation services of 
the Rev. John H. Barrows. The Rev. R. W. Patterson, 
D. D., was the presiding Minister and propounded the 
constitutional questions. The Rev. J. M. Worrall, D.D., 
offered the invocation and read the Scripture lesson. 
The Rev. Herrick Johnson, D. D., preached the sermon. 
Prof. Franklin W. Fisk, D. D., offered the installing 
prayer. The charge to the Minister was given by the 
Rev. A. E. Kittredge, D. D., and the charge to the people 
by the Rev. George C. Noyes, D. D. 

Prelude — "Overture" to "The Occasional Oratorio" 

---------- Kandel 

Anthem — "The Twenty-fourth Psalm" - - Otis 

Anthem — "I Waited for the Lord" - - Mendelssohn 

Duet sung by Mrs. Farwell and Miss Wallace. 
Anthem — "King, All Glorious" - - - - Barnby 

Postlude — "The Hallelujah Chorus" ("Mount of OHves") 

--------- Beethoven 

The regular Choir was assisted by: 

The Choir of the Second Presbyterian Church; Mrs. J. A. 
Farwell (S.), Mrs. F. S. Bagg (A.), Mr. R. T. Howard 
(T.) and Mr. H. L. Sloan (B.). 

The Choir of the Third Presbyterian Church; Miss Kittie 
Wallace (S.), Miss Pauline Rommeiss (A.), Mr. O. C. 
Snider (T.) and Mr. A. L. Goldsmith (B.). 

The Choir of the Fourth Presbvterian Church; Mrs. W. H. 
Aldrich (S.), Mrs. C. F. Summy (A.), Dr. Charles T. 
Barnes (T.) and Mr. William Sprague (B.); Mr. Clarence 
Eddy (O). 

The Chicago Tribune on the following day, speaking of 
this service, said: "The music was the best ever sung on a 
similar occasion in Chicago." 

December 25— Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude— Overture to "The Messiah" - - Handel 

.■\nlliem — "Magnificat in D" _ _ _ _ Tours 




JOHN' HEXRV HARROWS. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 73 

Anthem— "O Zion, That Tellest" - - - Buck 

Anthem — "Our Psalm of Joy" ("Noel") - - Gounod 

Postlude— "The Hallelujah Chorus" - - - Handel 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks and Mrs. 
L. M. Prentiss, sopranos; Miss Lulu St. C. Tuthill and 
Miss Annie Upton, altos; Mr. John Rattenbury and Mr. 
Charles M. Smith,' tenors; Mr. W. L. Mason and Mr. 
J. S. Moore, basses; Mr. Clarence Eddy, (O). 

1882 

January 1 — Sunday afternoon. Choir assisted Professor Fisk 
at the funeral services of Mr. Jesse Whitehead, one of 
the pioneers in the west. 

Mr. Whitehead was born in New York City in November, 
ISOO. His father, a wholesale merchant of that city, removed 
with his family in 1812 to WheeHng, Va. Early in the 
"forties," Jesse Whitehead decided to go farther west and 
came to Madison, Ind., then a prosperous town on the Ohio 
river, where he started in business as a merchant. Mr 
Whitehead was one of the first to recognize the possibilities 
of the steamboat interest on the Ohio river — building large 
ship yards at Madison. Later, with Messrs. Chauncey B. 
Blair, Hugh McCullough (afterward Secretary of the U. S. 
Treasury) and others, he organized the system of State banks 
throughout Indiana. Mr. Whitehead came to Chicago in 
1863. 

February 12 — Sermon by the Rev. George C. Lorimer, D. 
D.2 Text, "I am the way, the truth and the life." (St. 
John xiv: 6.) 

March 19 — The Minister spoke in the morning on the "Hope- 
lessness of skepticism as illustrated in the case of John 
Stuart Mill." 

April 9- — Easter Celebration, for solo voices, chorus and or- 
gan. Sermon by Mr. Barrows. Text, "If Christ be not 
risen, then * * * your faith is also vain." (I Cor. xv. 14.) 

May 21 — Miss Emily Winant (A.), soloist at the May Festival 
in Chicago, sang at the offertory, Adam's "Christmas 
Song." Miss Winant died at New Rochelle, N. Y., 
June 26, 1907. 

1 Mr. Charles M. Smith died February- 29. 1S96, aged fifty-seven. He was a son 
of Mr. Elijah Smith, member of the Choir in the "Wooden Church" (1849). 

2 The Rev. George C. Lorimer. D. D., former Minister of the First and Immanuel 
Baptist Churches in Chicago, died September 8. 1904, at Aix-les-Bains. France. 



74 PULPIT AXD CHOIR. 

May 28— Mrs. E. Aline Osgood (S.), soloist at the May Festi- 
val, sang during the offertory, "I Know That My Re- 
deemer Liveth" (Handel). 

July 23-30 — In the absence of Mr. Barrows, the pulpit was 
occupied by the Rev. Jeremiah Prophet Elijah Kumler of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Mr. L. J. Henderson was organist in August, in the ab- 
sence of Mr. Eddy. 
September 10 — 

Prelude — "Adeste Fideles" ----- Guilmant 

Posllude— "Concert Satz, in E Moll" - - Thiele 

Mr. Eddy. 

Mr. Barrows spoke from the text, "But seek ye first the 
Kingdom of God, and His righteousness" (St. Matt, vi: 33). 

September 17 — Miss Willard spoke at the Church in the 
evening, on "Temperance." 

November 5 — The Rev. S. J. McPherson began his labors as 
Minister of the Second Presbyterian Church. 

November 30 — Thursday A. M. Union Thanksgiving Serv- 
ice in this Church: 

Prelude — "First Sonata, First Movement" Mendelssohn 

Anthem — "Cantate Domino in D" - - S. P. Warren 

Anthem — "Praise God in His Holiness" - - Tours 

Anthem — "Sing Praises to God" _ _ _ Wareing 

Postlude — "Harvest March in C" _ _ _ Calkin 

Sermon by the Rev. Frank Bristol, of Trinity M. E. Church. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks and 
Miss Dora B. Foreman (S.), Miss May Phoenix (A.), Mr. 
John Rattenbury (T.) and Mr. William Sprague (B.); 
Mr. Clarence Eddy (O.). 

December 25 — Christmas Celebration : 

Anthem — "The Syrian Shepherds" - _ - - Otis 

The Minister spoke on the "Kingship of Christ." Text: "He 
that is born King of the Jews." (St. Matt, ii: 2.) 

"This morning," said Mr. Barrows, "we celebrate the birth- 
day of our King, for whom, Napoleon said at St. Helena, 
'millions are willing to die.' " 

1883 

February 18 — Evening services began at Central Music Hall, 
conducted by Dr. Barrows, with the assistance of the 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 75 

Church Choir and a chorus under the direction of Mr. 
W. L. TomHns. Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist. 

These services, held in the heart of the downtown dis- 
trict of our city, were conducted every Sunday evening 
through the winter until May 13, and the results were in 
every way gratifying. It was an inspiration to hear the 
great audience sing the hymns. The maintenance of this 
work, until discontinued in 1888, was undertaken by a com- 
mittee from the First Church, consisting of INIessrs. John 
Ailing, George F. Bissell, A. C. Bartlett, Alfred Cowles, 
Nathan Corwith, Henry Corwith, John B. Drake, Marshall 
Field, Charles D. Hamill, Henry M. Humphrey, Marvin 
Hughitt, Charles M. Henderson, David W. Irwin, Claudius 
B. Nelson, George H. Laflin, Dr. D. K. Pearsons, Byron L. 
Smith, H. M. Sherwood, F. F. Spencer and William H. Swift. 

February 25 — An address given at Central Music Hall this 
evening by Dr. Barrows, on John Stuart Mill. 

March 25 — Easter celebration, for solo voices, chorus and 
organ. The Choir gallery and pulpit decorated with 
flowers and plants, the gift of Mr. F. F. Spencer. 

April 15 — 

Prelude — Adagio, "First Sonata" - - H. M. Dunham 
Anthem — "Hear my Prayer" _ _ _ Southard 

Sermon by the Rev. S. J. McPherson, D. D., of the Second 
Presbyterian Church. 

May 20 — Miss Esther Butler resigned; has taken a Choir 
position in New York City, and is succeeded by Mrs. 
J. C. Buckbee (S.). 

June 24 — Celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
Church : 

Prelude — "Festival Overture" - - - - Nicolai 

Anthem — "Te Deum in G" - - - - - Calkin 

Anthem — "O Saving Victim" _ - - - Gounod 
Festival Hymn — "The Glories of the Messiah" - Otis 

Postlude — "Prelude and Fugue" ("Old Hundred") Eddy 

Historical sermon by the Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D.; 
text, "What hath God wrought?" (Numbers xxiii : 23.) 
The Rev. Jeremiah Porter, D. D., Founder (1833-35), 
the Rev. Flavel Bascom, D. D., second Minister (1839- 
1849), the Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., fifth Minister 



76 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

(186S-80) and the Rev. R. W. Patterson, D. D., first Min- 
ister of the Second Presbyterian Church (1842-74), took 
part in the services. 

The Choir: Mrs. J. C. Buckbee, Mrs. A. M. Sheib, Miss Mar- 
garet P. Sperry and Miss Flora M. Williams, sopranos; 
Mrs. J. T. Kempton and Mrs. Fannie Harrison, altos; 
Mr. Philo A. Otis and Mr. George E. Dawson, tenors; 
Mr. John M. Hubbard and Mr. Charles S. Lee, basses. 
Mr. Clarence Eddy (O.). 

In the evening a union Communion service of the First and 
Second Churches was held in the First Church, the serv- 
ice at the table being conducted by the venerable former 
Ministers of the Church, Dr. Porter and Dr. Bascom. 

June 25 — Monday evening, fellowship meeting at the Church; 
addresses by the Rev. S. J. McPherson, D. D. (Second 
Presbyterian), the Rev. H. M. Scudder, D. D. (Ply- 
mouth Congregational), the Rev. A. E. Kittredge, D. D.^ 
(Third Presbyterian), the Rt. Rev. Charles E. Cheney, 
D. D. (Christ Reformed Episcopal), the Rev. Frank 
Bristol (Trinity M. E.), the Rev. P. S. Henson, D. D. 
(First Baptist), and the Rev. Herrick Johnson, D. D. 
The large Choir of the Sunday service was assisted this 
evening by Miss ]\Iay Phoenix (A.),- Mr. Charles A. 
Knorr (T.) and Mr. WilHam Sprague (B.).^ 

June 26 — Tuesday evening. The Jubilee exercises termi- 
nated in a reception held in the parlors of the Church. 

July 15 — The Rev. Henry Ward Beecher, preacher. A great 
crowd took possession of the Church early in the morning, 
to the exclusion of the regular attendants. Mr. Beech- 
er's sermon was on "Love and Christianity," in which 
he put forth some advanced ideas on religion. 

August 26 and September 2 — Mr. Charles D. Irwin, organist, 
in the absence of Mr. Eddy. 

October 7 — Evening services began at Central Music Hall. 

November 11 — The 400th anniversary of Martin Luther's 
birth, observed: 

' The Rev. Abbott E. Kittredge, D. D., was Minister of the Third Presbyterian 
Church, Chicago (1870-1886); died December 16, 1912, in New York City. 

2 Miss May Phoenix, afterward Mrs. John A. Cameron. 

' Mr. William Sprague, of Sprague, Smith & Co., glass dealers, came to Chicago 
in 1858; sang with the Choir of the Second Presbyterian Church at various times until 
1864; one of the first members of the Apollo Musical Club (1872); director of the Choir 
of the Fourth Presbyterian Church (1871-1904); died in Chicago. October 10, 1906. 




1-lRST I'RESHVTHRIAX CIH UCH 
Indiana Avenue and Tuenty-1-irsl Street (\912). 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 77 

Prelude — "Theme and Variations, Luther Chorale" Eddy 

Anthem — Selections from Cantata, "A Stronghold Sure" 

---------- Bach 

Anthem — "The Lord is Great in Zion" - - Best 

Postlude — "Festival Overture" - - - - Nicolai 

Sermon by Dr. Barrows, "Martin Luther and the Reforma- 
tion." 

December 23 — Christmas Celebration: The regular Choir 
was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks and Miss Margaret 
P. Sperry, sopranos; Mrs. H. A. Cox (A.); Mr. Charles 
H. Clark (T.) and Mr. Charles S. Lee (B.). 

Prelude — Overture, "The Messiah" - - - Handel 

Anthem — "Sing, O Daughter of Zion" - - Gadsby 

Anthem — "O Saving Victim" _ - _ _ Gounod 

Christmas Hymn — "The Syrian Shepherds" - Otis 

Anthem — "O Sing to God" ----- Gounod 
Postlude— The Hallelujah Chorus ("The Messiah") 

---------- Handel 

1884 

January 27 — The service at Central Music Hall this evening 
was in the interest of "Prohibition of Sale of Liquors to 
Minors." Addresses were made by Dr. Barrows, the 
Rev. Edward E. Hale, D. D., of Boston, Messrs. Horton 
and Bonney. 

February 17 — Dr. Barrows' address at Central Music Hall 
in the evening, on "Some Personal Reminiscences of 
Wendell Phillips." 

March 9 — In the evening at Central Music Hall, the Nash- 
ville Colored Singers, and several colored preachers, 
entertained an immense audience. 

April 6 — The Rev. Walter Manning Barrows, D. D., brother 
of the Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D., spoke at Central 
Music Hall in the evening on his eight years of mission- 
ary w^ork among the Mormons in Utah. 
Dr. Walter Manning Barrows died at Mackinac Island, 
August 10, 1899. 

April 13 — Easter Celebration. The regular Choir was as- 
sisted by Miss Jessica Jenks and Miss May Bevan, so- 
pranos; Miss Willoughby (A.) ; Mr. George E. Dawson (T.) ; 
and Mr. Charles S. Lee (B.). 

Prelude — Chorale and Variations on "Jerusalem the 

Golden" -------- Spark 

Anthem — "Break Forth into Joy" - - - Barnby 
Anthem — "O Saving Victim" _ - - _ Gounod 
Offertory — Quartette, "O Lord, Veil not Thy Face" 

--------- Beethoven 



78 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Anthem — "God Hath Appointed a Day" - - Tours 

Postlude— The Hallelujah Chorus ("The Messiah") 

---------- Handel 

May 4 — 

Prelude — Adagio, "Sixth Symphony" - - Widor 

Anthem— "The Lord is Exalted" - - - J. E. West 
Offertory — "Blessed are They that Do God's Command- 
ments" -------- Armes 

Postlude — "Triumphal March" - - - - Dolby 

Sermon by the Rev. Charles M. Morton. 

May 25— 

Offertory — "Nazareth" ----- Gounod 

Mr. W. T. Carleton. 

The evening service at Central Music Hall was under the 
auspices of the Grand Army of the Republic. Dr. Bar- 
rows spoke on our illustrious dead. Mr. Hubbard sang 
"The Battle Hymn of the Republic." 

August 3 — The Rev. S. J. McPherson, D. D., preacher. 

August 10, 17— Mr. Charles D. Irwin (O.). 

August 24, 31— Mr. A. F. McCarrell^ (O.). 

Prelude — Intermezzo, "Sonata in A Minor" Rheinberger 
Postlude — "March in B Minor" - - - - Schubert 

September 7 — The first organ number this morning, the 
Prelude to Saint-Saens' oratorio, "The Deluge," was very 
appropriate, as the rain was coming down in torrents. 

October 12 — All the selections this morning by Joseph Rhein- 
berger: the "Pastoral Sonata" and the two motettes, 
"I am Well Pleased" and "The Lord Give Ear to Thee." 

November 2 — Evening services began at Central Music Hall. 

December 28 — Christmas Celebration. A day of sleet and 
rain, walks covered with ice, and the attendance in Church 
small. An elaborate display of flowers about the choir 
gallery and pulpit. The Choir numbers all important 
and well sung, especially Henry Gadsby's anthem, "Sing, 
O Daughter of Zion." Sermon by Dr. Barrows on the 
subject of Home Missions. 

1885 

March 1 — Sermon at Central Music Hall this evening by Dr. 
Barrows, on "Mahomet and His Religion." 

March 15 — 

Anthem — "Benedictus in C" - - _ S. P. Warren 
Offertory — "The Pilgrims" - - - - - Leslie 

March 29— The Rev. Dr. Allen, Secretary of the Freedmen's 
Boa rd, of Washington, D. C., at one time a slave owner, 

' Mr. McCarrell is now (1913) organist of the Second Presbyterian Church. 




CLAl 1)11 S HI CHAXAX XHI.Si "X. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 79 

as were his fathers before him, occupied the pulpit this 
morning, preaching in the interests of the freedmen. 
The death of Mr. C. B. Nelson, an Elder of this Church, 
was announced. 

April 1 — Wednesday afternoon; Dr. Barrows and the Choir 
took part in the funeral services of Mr. Nelson,^ at his 
late residence in Hyde Park. 

April 26 — Evening services at Central Music Hall, closed. 

May 17 — The Rev. Herrick Johnson, D. D., preacher. 

May 24— Mr. Louis P. Hoyt, organist. The Rev. D. C. Mar- 
quis, D. D., preacher. 

May 31— 

Prelude — "Meditation" ----- F. Capocci 

Anthem — "Bonum Est in G" - - - - Buck 

Offertory— "O Lord Most Holy" - - Schubert-Otis 

Postlude — "Finale" ______ F. Capocci 

Sermon by the Rev. W. A. Bartlett, D. D., of Washington, 

D. C. 

During the month of July, extensive repairs were made 
in the Church, and union services were held in the Second 
Presbyterian Church, Dr. Barrows occupying the pulpit. 
During the month of August, union services were held in the 
First Church, the Rev. E. C. Ray, D. D., preacher. 
August 9 — Memorial service for ex-President Grant. 

Offertory — "O for a Closer Walk with God" - Foster 

Sermon by the Rev. E. C. Ray, D. D. 
October 11 — Sermon by the Rev. Dr. Breed of St. Paul, 

Minn. 

November 15 — Evening services at Central Music Hall re- 
sumed. 

December 6 — 

Prelude — "Second Sonata" - - - - Rheinberger 
Sermon by Dr. Barrows; text: "Behold the Lamb of God." 

(St. John i: 29.) 
December 20 — 

Offertory — "If with all your Hearts" - Mendelssohn 

Mr. R. M. Sterrett. 



' Mr. Claudius Buchanan Nelson came to Chicago in 1842, and entered the hard- 
ware firm of Blair & Stimson, afterward knowTi as William Blair & Co. Later he be- 
came a partner, and continued with this firm until 1881, when he withdrew. Mr. 
Nelson was received into the membership of the Church, August 5, 1844, by letter 
from the First Presbyterian Church of Erie, Pa. He was one of the founders of the 
Lake Forest University, and a director in the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of 
the Northwest; died at Hyde Park, March 29, 1885, aged sixty-five. 



80 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

1886 

January 3— The Choir: Miss Carrie Davis (S.), Miss Christine 
Nielson (A.), Mr. R. M. Sterrett (T.), Mr. Eugene C. 
Cowles (B.), Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist and director. 
Anthem— "I Will Sing of Thy Power" - - Sullivan 
Mr. John M. Hubbard, who is succeeded today by ]\Ir. 
Eugene C. Cowles, came to Chicago in 1864 and entered the 
Choir of the Second Presbyterian Church on the first Sunday 
after his arrival. He has been with the First Church since 
January 2, 1876. His choir work in Chicago covers a period 
of thirty-nine years; twenty-five years in all with the Second 
Presbyterian Church, ending September, 1903; ten years with 
the First Church; two years with Unity Church (Rev. Robert 
CoUyer's) ; one year with Plymouth Congregational and part 
of a year with Union Park Congregational. Mr. Hubbard 
was the first to sing, "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp the Boys are 
Marching," on a Saturday evening in 1864, at the Ada street 
skating rink, with Captain A. R. Sabin, William Root and 
Martell Clark. ^ "We rehearsed the song," says Mr. Hubbard, 
"in the afternoon with Dr. Root in his study in the rear of 
Root & Cady's store on Clark street. Dr. Root was doubtful 
as to the success of the song on account of the great popular- 
ity of 'The Battle Cry of Freedom.' But that night, at the 
Rink, we sang 'Tramp, Tramp, Tramp,' again and again, 
until the great audience learned it, and then they sang with 
us." Mr. Hubbard took an active part with the Illinois 
Campaign Glee Club in the Presidential campaigns of 1872, 
'76, '80, canvassing Illinois, with Logan, Oglesby and CuUom, 
later in Indiana and Ohio, with Blaine, Conkling and Morton. 
Since 1889 Mr. Hubbard has been the Assistant Postmaster 
in Chicago. 

January 10 — 

Offertory — "Hear My Prayer" - - - Mendelssohn 
Miss Davis. 

January 15 — Members of the Choir took part in the fu- 
neral services of Mr. Daniel Amasa Jones, conducted by 
Dr. Barrows and Prof. Fisk. The ladies from the Old 
People's Home came in a body to pay final respects to 
their benefactor. 

Mr. Jones was born in Hartford, Conn., June 29, 1807; 
came to Chicago in 1859. He was one of the Trustees of 
Calvary Presbyterian Church, and a member of the com- 

' Mr. E. Martell Clark (B.), was an old time Choir and concert singer; member of 
the Apollo Musical Club (1874-75), and for nearly half a century associated with Lyon 
& Healy, as piano tuner. Mr. Clark died in Chicago, December 21, 1909. 




JOHX MAYXARD HUBBARD. 
By Permission of J. E. Purdy & Co., Boston. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 81 

mittee instrumental in bringing about the union with the 
First Church; died in Chicago, January 11, 1886. 
January 24 — 

Offertory— "Judge Me, O God" - - - - Buck 

Mr. Eugene C. Cowles. 

April 25 — Easter service by regular Choir. Offering this 
morning for Railroad Chapel, S7,400. 

May 2— Sermon by Mr. Dwight L. Moody. 

May 9 — Dr. Barrows announced from the pulpit that he 
should spend the summer in Europe, leaving home early 
in June. Sermon by the Rev. Dr. Dana. (The Rev. 
Herrick Johnson, D. D., filled the pulpit during the sum- 
mer months.) 

May 20 — Funeral services of Mrs. Augustus G, Downs, at 
her late residence, conducted by Dr. Barrows and the 
Rev. Flavel Bascom, D. D., assisted by members of the 
Choir. 

A reception was held in the Church in the evening (Thurs- 
day) for Dr. and Mrs. Barrows. 

July 24— Funeral services of Dr. R. C. Hamill held at the 
Church. Mr. A. W. Dohn, organist. 

Dr. Robert C. Hamill was born at Xenia, Ohio, Novem- 
ber 26, 1808; came to Chicago, first, in 1847; later, in 1852. 
Dr. and Mrs. Hamill were received into the membership of 
the First Church, April 28, 1858. He was one of the incor- 
porators of the Academy of Medical Science in 1859; took an 
active part during the Civil War in the organization of the 
Soldiers' Rest and the Soldiers' Home. He was consulting 
physician of Cook County Hospital in 1866; Vice-President 
of the Presbyterian Hospital, Trustee of Rush Medical Col- 
lege, and had been a member of the Session of the First 
Church for many years. 

Three of Dr. Hamill's sons have been identified with the 
life of the First Church; Mr. Charles D. Hamill, well known 
in the art and musical growth of Chicago, who died January 
11, 1905; Mr. T. W. Hamill, now residing in Chicago, and 
Mr. Ernest A. Hamill, some time a member of the Board of 
Trustees of this Church, member of the present Committee 
on Music, and President of the Corn Exchange National Bank 
of Chicago. 



82 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

December 12 — 

Offertory — "Sing Ye Praise" ("Hymn of Praise") 

--------- Mendelssohn 

Mr. Charles Abercrombie.^ 

December 26 — Christmas Celebration. The principal Choir 
numbers were Tours' anthem, "Sing, Ye Heavens," and 
Gilchrist's motette, "It Came upon the Midnight Clear." 
The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Florence H. 
Henderson and Miss Genie M. Baldwin, sopranos; Mrs. 
Agnes Cox and ]\Iiss Lillian B. Allen, altos; Mr. Charles 
Abercrombie (T.), Mr. W. P. McHenry (B.); Mr. Clarence 
Eddy (O.). 

1887 
January 2— The Choir: Miss Esther Butler (S.), Miss Chris- 
tine Nielson (A.), Mr. Charles Abercrombie (T.), and Mr. 
Eugene C. Cowles (B.). Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist 
and director. 

January 16 — Choir enlarged for the Sunday morning serv- 
ices: three sopranos, three altos, two tenors and two 
basses. 

April 10 — Easter Celebration : 

Prelude — "Jerusalem, the Golden" - - _ Spark 

Anthem — "God hath Appointed a Day" - - Tours 

Anthem — "Why Seek Ye the Living among the Dead" 

---------S. P. Warren 

Easter Song — "The Resurrection" _ _ _ Shelley 

Miss Christine Nielson. 
Offertory — "See Now the Altar Garlanded with Flowers" 

--------- Faure-Buck 

Easter Sermon — The Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D. 
Address on behalf of Railroad Chapel — The Rev. Charles M. 

Morton. 
Postlude— The Hallelujah Chorus ("Mount of Olives") 

---------- Beethoven 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Lillie Hinman, Miss 
Jessica Jenks and Mrs. C. W. Rhodes, sopranos; Miss 
M. J. Kirkland and Miss Stella Lawrence, altos; Mr, 
Philo A. Otis and Mr. Harry T. Stallwood, tenors; Mr. 
Charles S. Lee and Mr. John M. Hubbard, Jr., basses; 
Mr. Clarence Eddy (O.). 

May 22 — Sunday, 2:15 P. M., funeral services of Mrs. Charles 
Huntington Starkweather, at the residence of her father, 
Mr. James Otis, 1216 Michigan avenue, conducted by 
Dr. Barrows, assisted by the Choir of the Second Presby- 
terian Church. Mrs. Starkweather died May 20. 

> Mr. Abercrombie had been a member of the choir in the Chapel Royal, London; 
later with King's Chapel, Boston; came to Chicago in December, 1886. 




THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
Indiana Avenue and Twenty First Street (1887 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 83 

June 24 — Funeral services of Otis Starkweather, oldest son 
of Mr. Charles Huntington Starkweather and the late 
Lurena Otis Starkweather, held at the residence of his 
grandfather, Mr. James Otis, 1216 Michigan avenue, con- 
ducted by Dr. Barrows, with the assistance of the Choir 
of the First Presbyterian Church. Otis Starkweather 
died June 22. 
September 28 — Wednesday afternoon, funeral services of Mr. 
William Cutting Grant. 

Mr. Grant was born at Lyme, N. H., October 8, 1829. 
He came to Chicago in 1857, and for some years was a partner 
in the law firm of Williams, Woodbridge & Grant. Later, he 
was a member of the firm of Grant & Swift; and at the time 
of his death, September 24, 1887, partner in the firm of Grant, 
Brady & Northrup. Mr. and Mrs. Grant were admitted to 
the membership of this Church in March, 1858. 
December 25 — Christmas Celebration : 

Prelude — Offertory on two Christmas Hymns, No. 2, 

— - — - — — ---- Guilmant 

Anthem — "The Syrian Shepherds" - - - Otis 

Anthem — "There Were Shepherds Abiding in the Field" 

---------- Vogrich 

Offertory — "Sweetly through the Night" - - Shelley 

Christmas Song — "Nazareth" _ _ - _ Gounod 

Mr. Eugene C. Cowles. 
Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - - - Handel 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. P. R. Carlson, Mrs. 

D. C. Joslyn and Miss Bessie Butler, sopranos; Mrs. Agnes 
Cox and Miss Stella Lawrence, altos; Mr. Philo A. Otis 
and Mr. D. A. Chppinger, tenors; Mr. Charles S. Lee and 
Mr. Frank Pearson, basses. Mr. Clarence Eddy, organ- 
ist and director. 

1888 

January 1— The Choir; Miss Esther Butler (S.), Miss Christ- 
ine Nielson (A.), Mr. Frank K. Root (T.) and Mr. C. H. 
Greenleaf (B.), succeeding Mr. Eugene C. Cowles.^ Mr. 
Clarence Eddy, organist and director. 

February 16 — Wednesday P. M., funeral services of Mr. 
Philo Adams Wilbor, held at the residence of Mr. Joseph 

E. Otis, 1730 Prairie avenue, conducted by the Rev. John 
H. Barrows, D. D., and the Rev. Simon J. I\IcPherson, 
D. D., with the assistance of the Choir of the First Church. 



1 Mr. Cowles resigned to take a position in the Choir of the Second Presbyterian 
Church, remaining with the Second Church several years. He is now engaged in 
light opera work. 



84 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Few young men were more loved and esteemed in the 
life of the First Church, than Philo Adams Wilbor. Our 
mothers were sisters, daughters of Deacon Philo Adams, of 
Huron, Erie County, Ohio. Deacon Adams, after whom my 
cousin and I were named, found time, though a farmer, to 
be the village postmaster, sheriff of the county and, in 1821- 
32, a contractor under the United States Government. Wil- 
bor's Ufe and mine had much in common. We entered the 
same college, Western Reserve at Hudson, Ohio, from which 
he was graduated in 1866, and I in 1868. 

He met with a serious accident when a child, which 
caused a disorder of the hip, resulting in lameness, from which 
he never recovered. Having a brilliant mind and being a close 
student, he led his class through college and received the 
highest honors at graduation. His scholarly tastes endeared 
him to professors and students alike. He came to Chicago 
in 1806 to attend the funeral of my mother at our home, 
369 (now 1216) Michigan avenue. At the suggestion of my 
father, he remained in Chicago to enter the service of the 
First National Bank, then at the southwest corner of Lake 
and Clark streets, when Mr. Edmund Aiken was its President. 
He continued with the bank until 1885, when he was given 
leave of absence for a tour of the world. He returned in 
poor health in July, 1887, a serious heart difficulty having 
developed. His death, February 14, 1888, was a great blow, 
as he was like an elder brother to me. We had the 
same names, the same tastes, visited the same houses. Profess- 
or Thomas Day Seymour of Yale College, wrote, when he 
heard of my cousin's illness: "The thought of no other 
friend carries me back so far and to so much that was at- 
tractive. When I saw him in Athens, two years ago, he 
seemed very delicate. Wilbor had a rare power in his very 
youth of attracting friends." Mr. Frank F. Morrill of New- 
bury port, Mass., my classmate (1868), in a recent letter 
(1912), said: 

"Where could you match then, where could you match 
now, or at any time in the interval, the superlative merits, 
the fineness of fiber, the devotion to the loftiest ideals, of 
Philo Adams Wilbor." 




II11.( ) ADAMS WII.Bi )R. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 85 

April 1 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude — "Alleluia," from "Easter Sonata" - Lemmens 

Anthem — "King, All Glorious" - - - - Barnby 

Anthem~"Hark, Hark, My Soul" - - - Shelley 
Anthem — "I Waited for the Lord" - - Mendelssohn 

Miss Butler, Miss Hiltz and chorus. 

Anthem — "God hath Appointed a Day" - - Tours 

Postlude — "Easter March" ----- Merkel 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Grace Hiltz and Miss 
Florence H. Henderson,* sopranos; Miss Stella Lawrence 
and Mrs. Agnes Cox, altos; Mr. Philo A. Otis (T.), Mr. 
Charles S. Lee (B.). Mr. Clarence Eddy (O.). 

May 6 — Annual collection for Railroad Chapel; $G,400 sub- 
scribed. INIiss Fannie Aiken (S.) succeeds Miss Esther 
Butler, and Mr. George H. lott, succeeds Mr. C. H. 
Greenleaf (B.). 

August 5 — Mr. Charles D. Irwin (O.), in the absence of Mr. 
Eddy. 

November 29 — Union Thanksgiving services by the First 
and Second Presbyterian, Plymouth Congregational, Im- 
manuel Baptist, Christ Reformed Episcopal and Trinity 
Methodist Episcopal Churches, held in the First Church: 
Prelude — "Jerusalem, the Golden" - - - Spark 

Anthem — "Ve shall Dwell in the Land" - - Stainer 

Offertory — "Thanksgiving Anthem" - - - Schnecker 
Postlude — "Thanksgiving March" - _ - Calkin 

The Choir: Miss Fannie Aiken (S.), Miss Christine Nielson 
(A.), Mr. Frank K. Root (T.) and Mr. A. D. Eddy (B.). 
Mr. Clarence Eddy (O.). 

December 23 — Christmas service, for solo voices and chorus: 

Offertory — "Our Psalm of Joy" ("Noel") - - Gounod 

1889 

The Choir: ]\Iiss Fannie Aiken (S.), jMiss Christine Nielson (A.), 
Mr. Frank K. Root (T.), Mr. George H. lott (B.). Mr. 
Clarence Eddy, organist and director. 

April 7— Annual collection for Railroad Chapel; S6,G00 sub- 
scribed. 

April 21 — Easter Celebration : 

Prelude — "Alleluia" from "Easter Sonata" - Lemmens 
Anthem — "Awake, Thou that Sleepest" - - Maker 

Carol — "Sweetly the Birds are Singing" - - Draper. 

Anthem — "Faintly and Softly the Rosy Shaft of Morning" 
---------- Schnecker 



Afterward, Mrs. Rudolph Matz. 



86 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Aria — "I Know that My Redeemer Liveth" - Handel 

Miss Aiken. 
Anthem — "See Now the Altar Garlanded with Flowers" 
--------- Faure-Buck 

Postlude — "Easter March" ----- Merkel 

April 2S — Patriotic service, consisting of national songs by 
the Choir and a sermon by Dr. Barrows. Subject, "The 
Birth of a Nation." 

April 30 — Tuesday morning. Centennial Celebration of the 
Nation's birthday. The regular Choir was assisted by 
Miss Genie M. Baldwin (S.), Mrs. Katharine Fisk (A.), 
Mr. Philo A. Otis (T.), Mr. F. M. Ramsey (B.) and the 
Elgin Band, under the direction of Mr. J. Hecker. The 
First Regiment I. N. G. attended the service. National 
songs were sung by the Choir, Sunday School and Con- 
gregation, and an address was delivered by Dr. Barrows; 
subject, "A Hundred Years." The Church was decorat- 
ed with flags, and a program printed in the national 
colors, with a portrait of George Washington, was pre- 
pared for the occasion. 

May 31 — Funeral services of Mr. Nathan Corwith, conducted 
by the Rev. Dr. McPherson, w4th the assistance of the 
Choir of the First Church. 

From June 1 to October 1, Mr. Eddy was in Europe, and 
his place was filled by Mr. Charles D. Irwin. Miss Christine 
Nielson resigned in May, to go abroad for study, and her 
place was taken by Mrs. Katharine Fisk. The Church was 
closed during the months of July and August, for repairs. 
During September, services were held in the lecture room 
on Sunday mornings. 

June 2— Sermon by the Rev. Thomas C. Hall, D. D. 

September 15 — Mr. George H. lott (B.) tendered his resig- 
nation; succeeded on November 10, by Mr. Arthur 
Beresford. 

A series of praise services was commenced Sunday 
evening, November 24, in the Church and continued through 
the winter. 

December 29 — Morning service: 

Offertory — "O Rest in the Lord" - - Mendelssohn 
Miss Gertrude Edmands. 

A Christmas service was held in the evening: 

Prelude — "Cliristmas Pastorale" _ _ _ Merkel 




CHARLES 1) IRWIN. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 87 

Anthem — "Christmas" ------ Shelley 

For soprano solo, ladies' quartette, chorus, har]), viohn 
and organ. 
Song — "In Dreams I've Heard the Seraphs" - Faure 

"Largo" — ___-_--- Handel- 

Harp, violin and organ. 
Sermon— "The Old Year"— Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D. 
Carol — "Thou didst Leave Thy Throne" - - Powell 

Postlude — "Grand Solemn March" - - - Smart 

The regular Choir was assisted by ]\Iiss Lillian E. Randall 
and Miss M. L. Davis, sopranos; Miss Rose Bilton (A.); 
Mr. E. C. Greenleaf (T.); Mr. John S. Carpenter (B.); 
Mme. Josephine Chatterton (harp); Mr. Adolph Rosen- 
becker (violin) ; Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist and di- 
rector. 

1890 

The Choir: Miss Fannie Aiken (S.), Mrs. Katharine Fisk (A.), 
Mr. Frank K. Root (T.) and Mr. Arthur Beresford (B.); 
Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist and director. 

Miss Aiken resigned May 1, and her place was taken 
by Miss Electa Gifford. Mr. Charles D. Irwin was organist 
during the month of August, in the absence of Mr. Eddy. 

August 18 — Monday afternoon, Dr. Barrows, assisted by 
members of the Choir, conducted the funeral services of 
Mrs. Rebecca M. Whitehead. 

December 28 — Christmas celebration : 

Prelude — "Christmas Pastorale" - _ _ Merkel 

Anthem — "There Were Shepherds" - - Blumenschein 
Carol — "Thank God on Christmas Morning" - Hatton 

Sung by the Sunday-school children, led by 
Mr. Adam Craig. 
Recitative and Aria — "O Thou that Tellest" - Handel 

Mrs. Fisk. 
Anthem — "See Now the Altar" - - - Faure-Buck 

Sermon — "The Messiah has Come" - Rev. John H. Bar- 
rows, D. D. 
Carol— "The Blessed Story" - _ _ _ Geibel 

Sung by the Sunday-school children. 
Postlude— "For Unto Us a Child is Born" - Handel 

Evening Service. 
Prelude — "Christmas Offertoire in C" - - Grison 

Organ — "March of the Magi Kings" - - - Dubois 

Violin Solo — "Benedictus" - - - - MacKenzie 

Song — "Christmas" ------ Shelley 

Miss Gifford, accompanied by violin and organ. 
Flute Solo — "Prayer" ----- Terschack 

Anthem — "The Syrian Shepherds" - - - Otis 

Sermon — "The Wonderful" — Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D. 
Anthem — "Arise and Shine" _ - - _ Maker 

Organ Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - Handel 



88 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. E. P. Arters, Miss 
Lillian E. Randall, Miss L. M. Davis, sopranos; Miss Rose 
Bilton (A.), Mr. C. W. Crankshaw (T.), Mr. Frank Pear- 
son (B.), Mr. Adolph Rosenbecker (violin), Mr. E. S. 
Timmons (flute), Mr. John Quinn (cornet). Mr. Clar- 
ence Eddy (O.). 

1891 

The Choir: Miss Electa Gifford (S.), Mrs. Katharine Fisk (A.), 
Mr. Frank K. Root (T.), and Mr. Arthur Beresford (B.), 
Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist and director. 

January 18 — Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., preacher. 

May 17 — Mrs. Christine N. Dreier (A.) returns to her old 
position, succeeding Mrs. Fisk. 

Mrs. Katharine Fisk made her first public appearance with 
the Apollo Musical Club (Chicago) in "The Messiah," Decem- 
ber 26, 1890. She sang with the Worcester (Mass.) Festival 
(1893), Gloucester Festival, England (1895), Norwich Festi- 
val, England (1896), and London Philharmonic (1898). 
Afterward, Mrs. Fisk returned to New York City and was 
solo contralto in St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church. She 
now (1913) resides in Los Angeles, Cal. 

The offering this morning was for Railroad Chapel; 
$7,000.00 subscribed. 

The new building of Railroad Chapel, 3825 Dearborn 
street, was formally opened today. 

June 14 — Mr. Arthur Beresford^ resigns and is succeeded by 
Mr. Edward A. Allen (B.). 

September 27 — 

Postlude — "Fantasia in C Minor" - - Thiele-Haupt 
Mr. William Middleschulte. 

The Rev. Herrick Johnson, D. D., occupied the pulpit 
October 25. Subject, "Blessed Companionship." Text, 
"Enoch walked with God." (Gen. v: 24.) The following 
Sunday, November 1, the Rev. E. C. Ray, D. D., spoke on 
the same text. 

December 6 — The Journal says, "rain, snow and ice; fierce 
gale from lake." Dr. Barrows' subject this morning, 

' Mr. Beresford is now (1913) a member of the Choir of the Second Presbyterian 
Church, Chicago. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 89 

"A Ten Years' Pastorate in Chicago." Text, "That was 
the true Light," etc. (St. John i: 9.) In these ten years 
we have seen the population of Chicago increase from 
550,000 to 1,200,000. In 1881, the benevolences of this 
Church were $40,000. In 1891, they were five times 
that amount. 

December 27 — Christmas music for solo voices, chorus and 
organ. 

1892 

The Choir: Miss Electa Gifford (S.), Mrs. Christine N. Dreier 
(A.), Mr. Frank K. Root (T.) and Mr. E. A. Allen CB.). 
Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist and director. 

April 10 — 

Offertory — "The Palm Branches" - _ _ Faure 

Mr. Arthur Beresford. 

April 17 — Easter Celebration. A wet, cold day. 

Prelude — "Funeral March and Seraphic Song" Guilmant 
Anthem — "Awake, Thou that Sleepest" J. Wallace Goodrich 
Carol — "Chime Softly, Bells of Easter" - - Shepperd 
Anthem — "Come, See the Place Where Jesus Lay" 

--------- John A. West 

Offertory — "Easter" ------ Shelley 

Miss Gifford. 
Postlude — "Laus Deo" ------ Dubois 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. Eva P. Arters, Miss 
Lillian E. Randall and INIiss May Keller, sopranos; Miss 
Jennie R. Holmes and ]\Iiss Rose Bilton, altos; Mr. C. W. 
Crankshaw (T.), and Mr. John S. Carpenter ^ (B.). 

In the afternoon, funeral of Mr. L. C. P. Freer. Dr. Barrows 
conducted the services, assisted by Mrs. John A. Farwell 
(S.), Mrs Oliver K. Johnson (A.), Mr. Philo A. Otis (T.) 
and Mr. John M. Hubbard (B.). 

Mr. Freer was born September 18, 1813, at North East, 
Dutchess County, State of New York. He came west in 
1836, commencing life in a small town in Illinois as a mer- 
chant. Two years later he removed to Chicago and began 
the study of law. In after life, he became especially success- 
ful in that part of the profession pertaining to the examina- 
tion of land titles, owing to his extensive knowledge of early 
transactions in real estate. Mr. Freer died April 14, 1892. 

1 Mr. John S. Carpenter, well known in Board of Trade circles, and a former 
Vice-President of the Apollo Musical Club, died March 10, 1902. 



90 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

June 19 — The Second Presbyterian Church celebrated its 
Fiftieth Anniversary. 

Dr. Barrows was absent from the city nearly all of the 
summer months, on account of his health. The Rev. Charles 
M. Morton preached September 11; the Rev. Herrick John- 
son, D. D., September 18; the Rev. David C. Marquis, D. D., 
September 25. 

October 6 — Reception at the Church this evening (Thurs- 
day) for Dr. and Mrs. Barrows. Music by Mr. W. C. 
E. Seeboeck,* Mr. E. Schmitt (violin), and members of 
the Choir. 

November 13 — A window built by the Louis Tiffany Co. of 
New York, in memory of Mr. and Mrs. F. F. Spencer, 
was exhibited today. 

The inscription reads: 

To THE Glory of God, 

AND IN Loving Remembrance of 

Franklin Fayette Spencer, 

Who Died November 1, 1890, and of 

Rachel Gifford Spencer, 
His Wife, W^ho Died March 18, 1887. 
December 25 — Christmas Celebration. A beautiful day, and 
a large attendance. 

Prelude — "Fantasia on Christmas Hymns" - Guilmant 
Anthem — "Wake, O My Soul" - - - Blumenschein 
Carol — "Ring Out a Joyful Peal" _ _ _ Bennett 
Organ — "Christmas Pastorale" - - - G. E. Whiting 
A Christmas Pastoral anthem — "While Shepherds 

Watched Their Flocks by Night" George C. Martin 

Offertory — "The Star of Peace" - - - Henry Parker 

Mrs. Christine N. Dreier. 
Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - - - Handel 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. Will J. Evans and 
Miss May Keller, sopranos; Miss Rose Bilton (A.); Mr. 
C. W. Crankshaw (T.), and Mr. Frank Pearson (B.). 

At the evening service j\Ir. Edouard Remenyi, the Hungarian 
violinist, assisted: 

1. — "Ghezir," for violin alone - - - - Remenyi 
2. — "Largo," with organ _____ Tartini 

1893 

The Choir: Miss Electa Gifford (S.), Mrs. Christine N. Dreier 
(A.), Mr. Frank K. Root (T.) and Mr. E. A. Allen (B.). 
Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist and director. 

1 Mr. W. C. E. Seeboeck was born in Vienna, Austria, August 21, 1860; came to 
Chicago in 1880; was accompanist for the Apollo Musical Club several seasons; suc- 
cessful teacher, composer and concert pianist; died in Chicago, June 1, 1907. 




EDdl'ARD REMENVI 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 91 

January 29 — Mr. Edouard Remenyi' took part in the even- 
ing service, playing the aria from Handel's "Messiah," 
"I Know that My Redeemer Liveth." 
Sunday evening praise services were held through the 
winter of 1892-93, and the entire period of the World's Fair, 
but in the spring of 1894 were discontinued. The Choir was 
assisted by occasional instrumentalists, Mr. Edwin S. Tim- 
mons- (flute); Messrs. Theodore Spiering,^ Harry Dimond 
and Adolph Rosenbecker (violinists). 

March 19— The Rev. Theodore L. Cuyler, D. D., preacher 
this morning. Text, "Arise, let us go hence." (St. John 
xiv: 31.) A large audience present. 

At the evening service, the Rev. T. DeWitt Talmage, D. D.,* 
preacher. Text, "The statutes of the Lord are right." 
(Ps. xix: 8.) Another great audience. 

April 2 — Easter Celebration. A beautiful spring day, and a 
large audience. 

Prelude — "Paschal Sonata, First Movement" - Lemmens 
Anthem — "Awake, Thou that Sleepest" - - Maker 

Anthem — "O Saving Victim" _ - _ - Gounod 
Solo — "Easter Dawn" ------ Woodman 

Mrs. Dreier. 
Offertory — "Christ, the Lord, is Risen Today" Shelley 

Postlude — Finale, "Pastoral Sonata" - - Lemmens 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss May Keller and Miss 
M. Louise Pomeroy, sopranos; Miss Rose Bilton (A.), 
Mr. C. H. M. Tobey (T.) and Mr. Frank Pearson (B.). 
At the evening service : 

Offertory— Flute Solo— "Prayer" - - - Terschak 
Mr. Edwin S. Timmons. 

April 2G — Wednesday evening, announcement w^as made of 
the death of the Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., at Sara- 
toga, N. Y. The entire evening given over to testi- 
monies of affection and regard from the members present, 
for the former Minister of this Church. 

May 21— Sermon by the Rev. Charles M. Morton. Annual 
collection for Railroad Chapel; $4,000 subscribed. 

June 15 — Death of Mr. Asa P. Kelley announced. 

1 Mr. Remenyi was bom in 1830, at Heves. Hungary; made his first visit to Amer- 
ica in 1858; died suddenly, May 15, 1908, while playing at a concert in San Francisco. 

2 Mr. Timmons was first flute in the Thomas Orchestra (1895-6). 

' Mr. Spiering was a member of the Thomas Orchestra (1902-05); concert meister 
of the New York Philharmonic Society (1911-12); now (1913) resides in Berlin and is 
engaged in teaching and concert work. Mr. Spiering is Conductor of the Concerts 
given by the "People's Free Stage" in Berlin. 

< Dr. Talmage died April 12, 1902, in Washington, D. C. 



92 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

During the World's Fair (May to November, 1893) 
many strangers attended the Sunday services of the Church; 
ministers, organists, Choir singers and others interested in 
Church work. Among the visiting organists may be noted: 
Mr. Alexander Guilmant of Paris; Mr. S. B. Whitney of the 
Church of the Advent, Boston; Mr. R. Huntington Woodman 
of the First Presbyterian Church, Brooklyn, and Mr. W. C. Carl 
of the Old First Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

September 3 — Sermon at the evening service by His Grace 
the Archbishop of Zante, Greece. At the conclusion of 
the service, Mr. Alexander Guilmant, the noted French 
organist, gave an informal recital. 

September 10 — The window in memory of Dr. Humphrey 
was displayed today. 

September 17 — The Rev. Dr. Momery of London, preacher at 
the morning service; the Rev. Joseph Cook, LL. D.,^ in 
the evening. 

November 12 — The Rev. Leonard W. Bacon, D. D., of New 
Haven, Conn., preacher. 

November 17 — Death of John Manning Barrows, oldest son 
of Dr. and Mrs. Barrows. 

December 24 — Christmas Celebration : 

Prelude— "The Holy Night" _ - _ _ Buck 

Anthem — "There Were Shepherds" - - - Foster 

Carol — "The Anthem of Peace" - - - - Barnby 

Organ — "March of the Magi Kings" - - - Dubois 

Anthem — "How Brightly Dawns" - - - Shelley 

Offertory — "The Angels' Christmas Song" - Brewer 

Miss Gifford. 

Anthem — "Sing, O Daughter of Zion" - - Gadsby 

Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - - - Handel 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. P. B. Wilson, Miss 
Jessica Jenks and Miss Gertrude Gifford, sopranos; Miss 
Viola Miksch and Miss Rose Bilton, altos; Mr. P. V. R. 
Key and Mr. Philo A. Otis, tenors; Mr. Charles H. Bush- 
nell and Mr. Charles S. Lee, basses. 



1894 

The Choir: Miss Electa Gifford (S.), Mrs. Christine N. Dreier 
(A.), Mr. Frank K. Root (T.) and Mr. Edward A. Allen 
(B.). Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist and director. 

' The Rev. Joseph Cook, LL. D., lecturer and author, died at Ticonderoga, 
X. Y., June 24, 1901. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 93 

January 13 — Saturday P. M., funeral services of Dr. Charles 
Gilman Smith, at his late residence, 94 Calumet avenue, 
conducted by Dr. Barrows, with the assistance of the 
Church Choir. 

Dr. Smith's grave at Graceland is marked by a plain 
headstone, bearing the inscription, "Charles Gilman Smith, 
a Succorer of Many." For forty years, he had been prom- 
inently identified with the social, literary and professional 
life of Chicago. He was born at Exeter, N. H., January 4, 
1828; prepared for college at Phillip's Academy; graduated 
from Harvard in 1847; came to Chicago in 1853. He was 
one of the six physicians who had the care of the Confed- 
erate prisoners at Camp Douglas during the war; consulting 
physician at the Hospital for Women and Children and the 
Presbyterian Hospital, and for some years was a Trustee of 
the Peck Home for Incurables, 

January 26 — Friday. Funeral services of Mr. David W. 
Irwin, at his late residence, conducted by the Rev. E. C. 
Ray, D. D., and the Rev. Charles M. Morton. Choir: 
Mrs. John A. Farwell (S.), Mrs. Christine N. Dreier (A.), 
Mr. George Hamlin (T.) and Mr. Edward A. Allen (B.). 
Mr. David Wickham Irwin was born at Sodus, Wayne 
County, N. Y., December 14, 1830. He came west early in 
the "fifties" to start in business in Saginaw, where he re- 
mained about a year, going from there to Canada to enter 
the grain business. In 1862, he established the firm of D. W. 
Irwin & Co., in Chicago. Mr. Irwin was an early member 
of Calvary Church and at various times, a member of the 
Board of Trustees and Board of Deacons of the First Church. 
He was a Trustee of the Orphan Asylum and a member of the 
first Board of Trustees of the Art Institute. i\Ir. Irwin died 
in Chicago, January 24, 1894. His son, :Mr. Charles D. 
Irw^n, succeeded (1895) Mr. Eddy as organist of the First 
Church. 

February 4 — Mr. John A. West* (O.), in the absence of Mr, 
Edd y. 

1 Mr. John A. West, organist and composer, died June 1, 1913, in Chicago. He 
was a pupil of Mr. Clarence Eddy (organ) and Mr. Frederic Grant Gleason (theory); 
graduated (1881) from Hershey School of Music in Chicago. Mr. West's principal 
works are: Cantata, "Faith and Praise "; organ works, "Melody in C," "Fantasie B 
Flat," "March in A"; anthems: "Light's abode," "Now is Christ Risen," "Sing O 
Heavens," and "While the Earth Remaineth." 



94 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

March 4 — Dr. Barrows in California. Sermon by Dr. Her- 
rick Johnson, in which he spoke of the recent death of 
the Rev. Robert W. Patterson, D. D., for thirty-two 
years Minister of the Second Presbyterian Church. 

Dr. Patterson was born January 21, 1814, near Mary- 
\dlle, Blount County, Tenn.; died at Evanston, Illinois, Feb- 
ruary 28, 1894. 

March 5— Monday. Death of Mr. O. D. Ranney announced; 
one of the oldest members of the Session. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ranney were admitted to membership in this Church 
July 2, 1858. 
March 25 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude— "In Paradise" ----- Dubois 

Anthem— "Awake, Thou that Sleepest" - - Goodrich 
Carol— "Chime Softly, Belis of Easter" - - Shepperd 
Anthem — "As It Began to Dawn" - - - Foster 

Offertory — "The Angels' Easter Song" - - Brewer 

Mrs. Christine N. Dreier. 

Anthem — "Every Flower that Blossoms" - Shelley 

Postlude — "Festal March" - - - - Claussmann 

Mr. Eddy. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. Virginia Evans, Miss 
Jessica Jenks, Miss Jeanette F. Russell and Miss Jennie 
Grey, sopranos; Miss Viola Miksch, Miss Rose Bilton and 
Miss Anna Millar, altos; Mr. P. V. R. Key and Mr. Philo 
A. Otis, tenors; Mr. Charles H. Bushnell and Mr. Charles 
S. Lee, basses. 

May 27 — The Rev. Charles M. Morton closes his long and 
useful work at Railroad Chapel, and is succeeded by the 
Rev. S. M. Johnson. 

July 22 — Sermon by the Rev. L. A. Ostrander of Lyons, 
N. Y., a member of this Church in 1858. 

October 7 — The Rev. Dr. Jessup of Beirut, Syria, spoke this 
morning on his forty years of work in that country. 
Postlude — "Funeral March and Song Seraphic" Guilmant. 

November 29 — Union Thanksgiving service of the First and 
Second Presbyterian, Immanuel Baptist, Plymouth Con- 
gregational, Trinity Methodist and Christ Reformed 
Episcopal Churches, held in the First Church: 

Prelude — "Jerusalem, the Golden" - - - Spark 

Anthem — "While the Earth Remaineth" - John A. West 

Offertory — "Hope in the Lord" ("Largo") - Handel 

Mrs. Christine N. Dreier. 

Postlude — "Finale, Op. 17" _ - _ _ Truette 

Mr. Eddy. 




SECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 
Michigan Avenue and Twentieth Street. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 95 

December 30 — Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude — "Pastoral in G" - - - - - Coerne 

Anthem — "Christians, Awake" - - - - Barnby 

Carol — "Sweet Christmas Bells" - - - - Stainer 

Anthem — "And There Were Shepherds" - - Foote 

Offertory — "The Star of Peace" - - - Henry Parker 

Mrs. Christine N. Dreier. 

Anthem — "Shout the Glad Tidings" - - - Gilchrist 

Postlude — "Religious March" - _ - - Guilmant 

Mr. Eddy. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. Eunice St. Clair Mar- 
tens, Miss Lillian E. Randall and Miss Pauline Stein, 
sopranos; Miss Anna H. Clarke, Miss Jennie R. Holmes 
and Miss Rose Bilton, altos; Mr. Frank W. Holder and 
Mr. Philo A. Otis, tenors; Mr. Charles H. Bushnell and 
Mr. Charles S. Lee, basses. 

1895 

The Choir: Miss Electa Gifford (S.), Mrs. Christine N. Dreier 
(A.), Mr. Frank K. Root (T.) and Mr. Edward A. Allen 
(B.). Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist and director. 

February 17 — President Harper^ of the University of Chi- 
cago spoke at the morning service. Subject, "Why 
should I study the Bible." 

The Rev. Frank W. Gunsaulus, D. D., of Plymouth Congre- 
gational Church, preacher at the evening service. 

March 10 — Morning service : 

Anthem — "Te Deum in D Minor" - _ _ Foote 

Offertory— "The City Beautiful" - - - Rodney 

Mrs. Christine N. Dreier. 

Miss Blanche Dingley (harp), and Mr. Adolph Rosenbecker- 
(violin), assisted at the evening service. 

March 31 — The last of the Sunday evening praise services. 

April 14 — Easter Celebration. A beautiful day and a large 
attendance. 

Prelude — "Fiat Lux" ------ Dubois 

Anthem — "Why Seek Ye the Living among the Dead" 
---------S. P. Warren 

An Easter Hymn — "Awake, Thou Wintry Earth" - Otis 
Anthem — "God Hath Appointed a Day" - - Tours 

Harp, flute and organ — "Berceuse" - - Oberthur 

' The Rev. William R. Harper, D. D., was bom July 26, 1856, in New Concord, 
Muskingum County, Ohio; was graduated from Yale College in 1875; entered on his 
duties as President of The University of Chicago July 1, 1891; died January 10, 1906, 
in Chicago. 

^ Mr. Rosenbecker is now (1912) a member of the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra. 



96 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Anthem — "Come, See the Place Where Jesus Lay" 

----------J. A. West 

Offertory — "Easter" ---___ Shelley 

Miss Gifford. 
Anthem — "Praise the Lord" _ _ _ Randegger 

Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - - - Handel 

Mr. Eddy. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks, Miss 
AHce Ettinger and Miss Lillian E. Randall, sopranos; 
Miss Anna H. Clarke, Miss Rose Bilton and Miss Jennie 
R. Holmes, altos; Mr. William A. Lamson and Mr. Philo 
A. Otis, tenors; Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. Charles 
S. Lee, basses; Miss Lee Timmons (harp); Mr. Edwin S. 
Timmons (flute). 

May 19 — Mr. Eddy's last Sunday as organist and director of 
the Choir. 

Prelude — First Movement, "Fifth Sonata" - Guilmant 

Anthem — "Awake, My Soul" _ _ _ _ Schnecker 

Solo — "Lead, Kindly Light" _ _ _ _ Shepperd 

Mrs. Christine N. Dreier. 

Offertory— Second Movement, "Fifth Sonata" - Guilmant 

Postlude — From "Fifth Sonata" _ _ _ Guilmant 

Mr. Clarence Eddy was born in Greenfield, Mass., in 
1851. His first musical studies were pursued in Greenfield; 
afterward in Hartford, Conn., with Mr. Dudley Buck. From 
1869 to 1871, he resided in Montpelier, Vt., as organist of 
Bethany Church. In the autumn of 1871, he went to Berlin, 
remaining there several years, studying with Haupt (organ) 
and Loeschhorn (piano). He was called to Chicago (1875) 
as organist of the First Congregational Church, remaining 
there two years. He began his work at the First Presbyterian, 
January 12, 1879. In 1876, he became general director of 
the Hershey School of Music in Chicago, and while with this 
School gave his famous series of one hundred organ recitals, 
without any repetitions. I studied the theory of music with 
Mr. Eddy from 1876 to 1881. Mr. Eddy and Mrs. Sarah 
Hershey were married July 1, 1879. Mrs. Eddy died in 
Paris, France, July 8, 1911. Mr. Eddy is now (1912) director 
of the Siegel-Myers Correspondence School of Music, Chicago, 
and associated with the Walter Spry School of Music. 

June 2 — A magnificent window in memory of Dr. Mitchell, 
displayed this morning; the work of the Tiffany Co., 
N. Y. Subject, "Paul Preaching to the Athenians." 




CI.AKHNCH HDDV 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 97 

June 28— Friday afternoon, funeral services of Mr. George 
Francis Bissell, President of the Board of Trustees, held 
at the Church, conducted by Dr. Barrows, assisted by 
the Choir. 

Mr. Bissell was born June 23, 1827, at Manchester, Conn. 
He w^ent to Dubuque, Iowa, in 1857; came to Chicago in 1861, 
and entered the employ of the Hartford Fire Insurance Co. 
He was appointed western manager of the Company in 1866, 
retaining the position until his death. Mr. and Mrs. Bissell 
were received into the membership of the Church, January 
4, 1862. Mr. Bissell was a member of the Session for many 
years, and, at the time of his death, was chairman of the 
Board of Trustees and a member of the Committee on Music. 
He was succeeded on the Board of Trustees by Mr. William 
H. Swift. 

September 17— Tuesday afternoon. Funeral services of Mr. 
James Otis (who died September 14) from his late resi- 
dence, 1722 Michigan avenue, conducted by Dr. Barrows 
and the Rev. Charles M. Morton. Choir: Mrs. John A. 
Farwell (S.), Mrs. Oliver K. Johnson (A.), Mr. Robert 
T. Howard (T.) and Mr. John M. Hubbard (B.). 

Mr. James Otis w^as born April 1, 1818, in Montville, 
Conn., a village not far from New London. In 1823, his par- 
ents removed to Berlin, Erie County, Ohio. On October 24, 
1845, he married Margaretta, daughter of Deacon Philo 
Adams of Huron, Erie Co., Ohio, and in 1856 came to Chi- 
cago. He was one of the founders of the Inferior, and Treas- 
urer of the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of the North- 
west from 1870 to 1884. The Rev. Marcus Whitman, a mis- 
sionary, largely instrumental in saving Oregon to the United 
States, was a lifelong friend of Mr. Otis. When Mr. Whit- 
man was on his way to Washington in 1834 to see Daniel 
Webster and the President, Mr. Otis traveled with him from 
Cleveland to Buffalo, and in after life often related the history 
of the Oregon trouble, as told to him by Mr. Whitman. 

Mr. Otis was one of the founders (1859) of Calvary Pres- 
byterian Church; member of the Board of Trustees of the 
united First and Calvary Churches, chairman of the building 
committee of the present edifice (1870-1873), and member 
of the Session until 1884. 



98 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

The Rev. Edward Anderson, second Minister of Calvary 
Presbyterian Church (lSGO-61), who w^as present at the fu- 
neral, writes of his Church work in Chicago, and his recollec- 
tions of ]\Ir. Otis: 

"My acquaintance with your father began in 1859, when 
he came to invite me from St. Joseph, Mich., to the pastorate 
of Calvary Church, and my earliest impression of him is 
through his enthusiastic devotion to that enterprise, which 
was then in its infancy. He was surrounded by a goodly 
array of men: Bennett B. Chambers, Joseph Meeker, Willard 
F. Myrick, Daniel A. Jones, George Gilbert, all of whom are 
gone before him, and Joseph N. Barker, who survives him, 
and who held the superintendency of the Sunday-school for 
many years. 

I shall never forget the day, when, rising in my pulpit 
at St. Joseph, I saw two strangers present who had a differ- 
ent tone from my usual parishioners. St. Joseph was then 
a small village, with the peach interest just started; we had 
built the Church with great effort. I think it was Mr. Cham- 
bers who accompanied your father to St. Joseph, but I am 
not sure. After service, your father walked home with me, 
and told me with the deepest interest, of the new work that 
had been started on Indiana avenue, just beyond Ringgold 
Place (now Twenty-second street), as he urged me to con- 
sider the call to become pastor of the Church for whose 
future he had such a prophetic prescience. 

It is interesting to remember that at that time (1860) 
all beyond my house, which was on Michigan avenue, a 
few blocks south of Ringgold Place, was given up to market 
gardening, and that Mr. Myrick had the first stock yards on 
Cottage Grove avenue at about Thirtieth street. Your 
father used to prophesy the greatness that he lived to see of 
this South Side. But I could not credit him in what seemed 
to me wild hopes. I am now writing at Fifty-fifth street, 
and seem yet to be in the heart of the city. I do not know 
where in the present city was the Reform School, but we rode 
through wild roads then to reach it, and all about it w^as 
farms with little promise of streets, still less of a great city." 

Mr. James Otis is survived by two sons, Mr. Philo 
Adams Otis, and Dr. Walter J. Otis of Boston, Mass. 

The month of December witnessed the retirement, by 
reason of the infirmities of old age, of Mr. John Ratcliffe 
Dyson, the faithful sexton of this Church who began his 
duties April 1, 1SG3, during the ministry of Dr. Humphrey. 




EDWARD ANDERSON'. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 99 

Mr. Dyson was born January 12, 1818, in Manchester, Eng- 
land; came to Chicago in 1845. He remained here a few 
years and then went to Milwaukee, where he was sexton of 
Plymouth Congregational Church during the time Dr. Hum- 
phrey was its pastor. Mr. Dyson returned to Chicago to be 
sexton of the First Church, at the suggestion of Dr. Hum- 
phrey; died February 4, 1902, in Chicago. 

October 8 — Funeral services of I\Irs. Flora Fisher, con- 
ducted at her late residence, 2419 Michigan avenue, by 
Dr. Barrows. Mrs. Fisher was born in 1799, and had 
been a member of the First Church for more than forty 
years. In speaking of her great age, Dr. Barrows said 
she might have seen all of the Presidents of the United 
States save one, George Washington. 

November 16 — Saturday. Funeral services of Mr. John B. 
Drake, conducted by Dr. Barrows, with the assistance 
of the Choir. 

I\Ir. John Burroughs Drake was born in Lebanon, Warren 
County, Ohio, January 17, 1824. In his address, Dr. Bar- 
rows said: 

"This man, who has been taken from us, filled a large 
place in the life of this community and of the nation. He 
was honored throughout the country, and was well known in 
other lands. He was one of the men who make the strength 
of a community like ours." 

November 24 — The Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D., tendered 
his resignation as Minister of the Church. 

December 29 — Christmas Celebration : 

Prelude — "Festal Song" _ _ - - John E. West 

Anthem — "Sing and Rejoice" _ - - - Barnby 

Carol— "The Anthem of Peace" - - - - Barnby 

Anthem — "There Were Shepherds" - - - Gaul. 

Offertory — "Angels' Christmas Song" - - Brewer 

Miss Gifford. 
Christmas Sermon — Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D. 
Christmas Hymn — "The Syrian Shepherds" - Otis 

Postlude — "Coronation March" - - - - Svendson 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks, Mrs. 
A. W. Beidler and Miss Hotchkin, sopranos; Miss Anna 
H. Clark and Miss Rose Bilton, altos; Mr. C. W. Crank- 
shaw (T.); Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. Frank H. 
Atkinson, Jr., basses; Mr. Charles D. Irwin (O.). 



100 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 



1896 



The Choir: Miss Electa Gifford (S.), Mrs. Oscar Remmer (A.), 
Mr. Frank K. Root (T.), and Mr. Edward A. Allen (B.). 
Mr. Charles D. Irwin (O.). 

January 25 — Saturday P. M., funeral services of Mr. Charles 
Mather Henderson, at his late residence, 1816 Prairie 
avenue, conducted by Dr. Barrows and the Rev. Charles 
M. Morton, assisted by members of the Choir. 

Mr. Henderson was born in New Hartford, Conn., March 
21, 1834; came to Chicago in 1854. He was for many years 
President of the Young People's Missionary Association of 
this Church, Superintendent of Railroad Mission Sunday 
School, and for some time a member of the Committee on 
Music. 

February 9 — Sunday evening. A great meeting was held 
in Central Music Hall, as a farewell tribute from the people 
of Chicago to Dr. Barrows. Addresses by Dr. Hensen, 
Bishop Fallows, the Rev. Frank Bristol and Mr. H. N. 
Higinbotham. 

February 12 — Wednesday evening. A service in memory 
of Mr. Charles M. Henderson. Addresses by the Rev. 
John H. Barrows, D. D., the Rev. Charles M. Morton 
and the Rev. D. A. McWilliams. Members of the Choir 
took part in the service. 

February 14 — Friday evening. A farewell reception to the 
Minister and his wife at the Church. Dr. Barrows read 
an address in which he set forth some of the duties and 
responsibilities in the active life of a city pastor. Then 
followed remarks by Bishop Cheney, F. L. Ensign, the 
Rev. Dr. McClure of Lake Forest, and the Rev. Mr. 
Robinson of Englewood. 

February 1G — The Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D., preached 
his last sermon this morning from the text, "Faith, 
hope, charity, these three; but the greatest of these is 
charity." (I Cor. xiii: 13.) 

April 5 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude — "Festival Prelude" _ _ _ _ Buck 

Anthem — "Break Forth into Joy" - _ - Barnby 

Anthem — "Very Early in the Morning" - H.W. Parker 

Anthem — "O Lamb of God" _ _ _ _ Gounod 

Offertory — "I Waited for the Lord" - - Mendelssohn 

Easter Sermon — "At the Grave in the Garden" — Rev. E. 
C. Ray. D. D. 



PULPIT .4 .YD CHUIR. 101 

Easter Hymn — "With Hands Upraised to Bless" - Otis 
Postlude — "Entree du Cortege" - - - - Dubois 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks, Mrs. 
A. W. Beidler and Miss Marguerite Easter, sopranos; 
Miss Rose Bilton, Miss Lucinda B. Lee and Miss Myra 
Miles, altos; Mr. E. F. Wait and Mr. Philo A. Otis, tenors; 
Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. Charles S. Lee, basses. 
Mr. Charles D. Irwin (O.). 

April 11 — Saturday, 2 P. M. Funeral services of Mrs. Har- 
riet Gaylord Smith, widow of the late Dr. Charles Oilman 
Smith, were held at her late residence, 2220 Calumet 
avenue. Mrs. Smith died on Wednesday last, April 8. 
She was a member of the First Church, a director of the 
Erring Woman's Refuge and of the Fortnightly Club. 

May 31— Mr. Frank K. Root^ and Mr. Charles D. Irwin, = 
having resigned, are succeeded by Air. William S. Hine 
(T.) and Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). The Church will 
always be under obligations to Mr. Irwin for his work on 
the Music Committee, and the interest he has taken in 
the Choir. The hydraulic motor attachment to the 
organ was secured principally through his efforts, and 
the larger part of the cost was borne by him. 

June 22 — jMonday morning. Funeral services of Yirs. Wil- 
lard F. IMyrick, one of the oldest members of the Church, 
were held at her late residence, 2967 Vernon avenue; 
conducted by the Rev. E. C. Ray, D. D. Mrs. Myrick 
was eighty years of age. At the conclusion of Dr. Ray's 
remarks, Mr. Fernando Jones, one of the pallbearers, 
arose and begged to add his testimony regarding Mrs. 
Myrick, (whom he had known for more than fifty years) 
and her life of benevolence and charity. He said her 
great mission in this world was to feed the hungry and 
clothe the naked. I\Ir. Jones spoke of ]Mrs. IMyrick's de- 
votion to the soldiers at Camp Douglas and her efforts 
to relieve the sufferings of the poor Confederate prison- 
ers who were confined there during the war. 

Mr. Willard Franklin ]\Iyrick, died January 27, 18S9, 
at the age of eighty. His home on Vernon avenue, built in 
1854, has been a landmark in that part of our city, and was 
well known for its hospitalities and abounding charities. Mr. 



1 Mr. Frank K. Root is Secretary and Treasurer of the McKinley Music Com- 
pany, Chicago, organized in 1896. 

2 Mr. Irwin is now (1913) organist and director of the Choir in the Ley den Church, 
Brookhne, Mass. 



102 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Myrick came to Chicago in October, 1836, from the shores of 
Lake Champlain, Vt., where he was born, July 11, 1809. 
Soon after his arrival in Chicago, he bought seventy acres on 
the lake between the present Twenty-sixth and Thirty-first 
streets. From 1839 to 1854, he kept the Myrick House, a 
noted stopping place for drovers and cattle men. Here the 
first stock yards was organized. 

September 27 — Sermon by Dr. Ray on the benefit of a col- 
legiate education. 

November 8 — Festival service: 

Prelude — "Offertoire in A" - - - Georges MacMaster 
Anthem — "Praise God in His Holiness" - - Tours 

Anthem — "Hark, Hark, My Soul" - - _ Shelley- 

Song — "The Star of Eternity" - - - - Lane 

Miss Gifford. 
Offertory — "Andante in D" _ _ _ _ HoUins 

Mr. Clarence Eddy. 
(Organist of the Church from 1879 to 1895) 
Sermon — "The Heavenly Vision," Prof. J. Ross Stevenson 
Anthem — "Let us Now Fear the Lord Our God" 

--------- John E. West 

Postlude — Finale, "Fifth Sonata" _ _ _ Guilmant 
Mr. Clarence Eddy. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks, Miss 
Lillian E. Randall and Mrs. A. W. Beidler, sopranos; 
Mrs. Cecelia Ryan, Miss Rose Bilton and Miss Lucinda 
B. Lee, altos; Mr. I. J. Shuart and Mr. Philo A. Otis, 
tenors; Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. F. H. Atkinson, 
Jr., basses. Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

This was Miss Gilford's last service in the Church. After 
two years of study in Paris, she was engaged for the Royal 
Opera in Amsterdam, Holland. On her return to America, 
in 1900, she made her home in New York City. During the 
next six years. Miss Gifford sang with many of the large 
orchestras of the United States, notably with the Theo- 
dore Thomas Orchestra of Chicago, the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, William Gericke, conductor, and with Emil Paur 
in New York. In 1903, she bought a home on Long Island, 
N. Y., at Rockville Centre, and accepted a position with the 
Hanson Place M. E. Church, and with the Temple Beth- 
Eloim Choir, where she is now engaged. Miss Gifford is 
interested in the real estate business on Long Island and in 
Florida. 




HORACE GRANT BIRD. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 103 

November 29 — 

Offertory — "My Redeemer and My Lord" - - Buck 
Miss Helen E. Aikman. 

December 27 — Christmas Celebration : 

Prelude — Overture, "The Messiah" _ - - Handel 

Anthem— "With Ail Thy Hosts" - - John E. West 
Anthem — "Festival Te Deum in E Flat, No. 7" - Buck 
Carol — "It Came upon the Midnight Clear" - Sullivan 
Offertory — "Christmas Song" - - _ - Adam 

Sermon — "The Indebtedness of the World to Christianity" 

— Rev. Samuel Ives Curtiss, D. D.* 
Anthem — "Sing, O Daughter of Zion" - - Gadsby 
Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - - - Handel 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks, Miss 
Lillian E. Randall and Mrs. A. W. Beidler, sopranos; 
Miss Ethel B. Carpenter, Miss Rose Bilton and Miss 
Lucinda B. Lee,- altos; Mr. Frank K. Root and Mr. 
Philo A. Otis, tenors; Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. 
F. H. Atkinson, Jr., basses. Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.) 



1897 

The Choir: Miss L. May Gurler (S.), until May 1, 1897, when 
she was succeeded by Mrs. Clara G. Trimble; Mrs. Chris- 
tine N. Dreier (A.), Mr. William S. Hine (T.) and Mr. 
Edward A. Allen (B.). Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

February 17 — Funeral services of Miss Pauline Louise Otis 
(died January 29, in Paris, France), daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph E. Otis, from their residence, 1730 Prairie 
avenue, conducted by the Rev. S. J. McPherson, D. D., 
and the Rev. Charles M. Morton. A few familiar hymns 
were sung by Mrs. Christine N. Dreier. 

February 28 — Mr. Arthur Dunham (O.), in the absence of 
Mr. Moore: 

Prelude — "Fantasia in E Flat" - - - Saint-Saens 

Offertory— "The King of Love My Shepherd Is" Gounod 

Miss Gurler. 
Postlude — "Prelude and Fugue in B Minor" - - Bach 

Prof. M. Bross Thomas of Lake Forest University occupied 
the pulpit this morning. 

April 11 — Announcement was made from the pulpit of the 
death on April 7, of Mr. Horace G. Bird, organist of this 
Church in 1868 when Dr. Mitchell began his pastorate. 

1 Died in London, September 22, 1904. 

2 Miss Lucinda B. Lee is now Mrs. Edward Buxton, and resides (1913) in West 
Superior, Wisconsin. 



10-i PJJLPIT AND CHOIR. 

April IS — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude — "Priere a Notre Dame" - - Boellmann 

Anthem — "Awake, Glad Soul, Awake" - - Foster 

Anthem — "Te Deum in B Minor" _ _ - Buck 

Easter Song — "Every Flower that Blossoms" - Shelley- 

Offertory — "Easter Morning" ----- Otis 
Postlude — "Introduction, Chorale and Minuet Gothique" 
--------- Boellmann 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks, Miss 
Grace E. Dudley and Miss Lillian E. Randall, sopranos; 
Miss Ethel B. Carpenter, Miss Daisy J. Hubbard and 
Miss Clarissa Smith, altos; Mr. Philo A. Otis and Mr. 
F. J. Wessels, tenors; Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. 
F. H. Atkinson, Jr., basses. Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

May 9— 

Offertory — "If with All Your Hearts" - Mendelssohn 
Mr. William S. Hine. 

May 22 — Saturday morning. Funeral services of Mr. Mat- 
thew Laflin, one of the oldest members of the Congrega- 
tion, at his late residence, conducted by Prof. Franklin 
W. Fisk, D. D. A few familiar hymns were sung by 
Mrs. Genevieve Clark Wilson and Mrs. Christine N. 
Dreier. 

Mr. Laflin was born in Southwick, Mass., December 16, 
1803; came to Chicago in 1837. He brought his family to 
Chicago the following year and, during the winter of 1838- 
39, they occupied quarters in Fort Dearborn. Mrs. Laflin 
was received into the membership of the Church, March 23, 
1839. The present home of the Chicago Academy of Sciences 
in Lincoln Park was a gift from Mr. Laflin. 

May 30 — Decoration Day: 

Prelude — "Allegretto in D Minor" _ _ - Foote 

Hymn — "The Son of God Goes Forth to War" SuUivan 

Anthem — "The Strain Upraise" - - - - Buck 

American Hymn — "Speed our Republic, O Father on 

High" -------- Keller 

National Song — "Song of a Thousand Years" - Work 

Sermon — "America's Place in the Evangelizing of the 

World"— Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D. 
Postlude — "The Star Spangled Banner" - - - Buck 

The jegular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks and Miss 
Grace E. Dudley, sopranos; Miss Laura Fleming and Miss 
Daisy J. Hubbard, altos; Mr. Frank K. Root and Mr. 
Philo A. Otis, tenors; Mr. Charles T. /Vtkinson, Mr. F. H. 
Atkinson, Jr., and Mr. Arthur T. Scott, basses. Mr. 
Francis S. Moore (O.). 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 105 

June 13— Pulpit occupied bv Prof. M. Bross Thomas of Lake 
Forest, 111. 

June 20 — Sunday afternoon. Funeral services of Mr. George 
W. Darrow/ conducted by the Rev. John H. Barrows, 
D. D., with the assistance of the Choir. 

June 30 — Wednesday evening. A formal call was extended 
by the Society to the Rev. W. J. Chichester, D. D., of 
the Immanuel Presbyterian Church, Los Angeles, Cal., 
to become the Minister of this Church. 

July 7 — Wednesday evening. Dr. Chichester's letter of ac- 
ceptance read. He will begin his labors October 1, 1897. 

August 1— The Rev. W. B. Jennings, D. D., Louisville, Ky., 
preacher. 

Death announced on July 30, at Ypsilanti, Mich., of Mr. 
Charles S. Lee, member of the Session, former Superin- 
tendent of Railroad Chapel Sunday-school, leader of the 
music at the evening services and a member of the 
Church Choir on festival occasions. 

August 22 — 

Offertory — "The Palm Branches" _ _ _ Faure 

Mr. Frank King Clark. 

September 26— Sunday evening, Memorial service for Mr. 
Charles S. Lee, at Railroad Chapel, conducted by the 
Rev. Charles M. Morton and the Rev. D. A. Mc Williams. 

October 3 — Dr. Chichester preached his first sermon. Text, 
"So, as much as in me is, I am ready to preach the gos- 
pel to you that are at Rome also." (Romans i: 15.) 
Prelude — Adagio, "Fifth Sonata" - _ _ Merkel 

Anthem — "The Strain Upraise" - - - - Buck 

Anthem — "O Lamb of God" _ _ _ _ Gounod 
Offertory — "Hark, Hark, my Soul" - - _ Shelley 

Anthem — "Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord" - Garrett 
Postlude — "Marche Religieuse" - - - - Guilmant 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Jessica Jenks and Miss 
Eleanor M. Goodman, sopranos; Miss Daisy J. Hubbard 
and Miss Esther M. Plumb, altos; Mr. Frank K. Root 
and Mr. Philo A. Otis, tenors; Mr. F. H. Atkinson, Jr., 
and Mr. Arthur T. Scott, basses. Mr. Francis S. Moore 
(O.). 

October 20 — Wednesday evening. Installation services of 
Dr. Chichester. The following members of the Chicago 
Presbytery took part: the Rev. Charles S. Hoyt, the 

' Mrs. Darrow died at Devon. Pa.. October 30. 1902. Funeral at this Church 
November 3, 1902. 



106 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D., the Rev. WilHs G. Craig, 

D. D., the Rev. Edward C. Ray, D. D., the Rev. C. A. 
Lippincott and the Rev. D. A. McWiUiams. 

Prelude — "Evening Song" ----- Bossi. 

Hymn~"The Son of God Goes Forth to War" 

--------- S. B. Whitney 

Anthem — "Sing unto the Lord" - - - - Sydenham 

Anthem — "O Lamb of God" - _ - - Gounod 
Anthem — "Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord" - Garrett 

Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - - - Handel 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Grace Chappell, Miss 
Jessica Jenks, Miss E. M. Goodman and Miss Grace E. 
Dudley, sopranos; Miss Laura Fleming, Miss Mertie M. 
White ^ and Miss Louise Blish, altos; Mr. Frank K. Root 
and Mr. Philo A. Otis, tenors; Mr. F. H. Atkinson, Jr., 
and Mr. Arthur T. Scott, basses. Mr. Francis S. Moore 
(O.). 
December 26 — Christmas Celebration : 

Prelude — "The Pastoral Symphony" _ _ _ Bach 

Violin, violoncello and organ. 
Chorale — "Break Forth, O Beauteous, Heavenly Light" 
----------- Bach 

(From "The Christmas Oratorio.") 
Anthem — "And There Were Shepherds" - - Foote 

Christmas Song — "Sweetly through the Night" Shelley 

Violin and organ accompaniment. 
Mrs. Christine N. Dreier. 
Violin Solo — "Air" ___---_ Bach 

Violoncello Solo — "Berceuse" - - _ - Godard 

Offertory — "I Waited for the Lord" - - Mendelssohn 

Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Miss L. May Gurler and chorus. 
Anthem — "O Come, Redeemer of Mankind" John E. West 

With accompaniment for violoncello and organ. 
Postlude — "And the Glory of the Lord" - - Handel 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss L. May Gurler, Miss 

E. ^L Goodman and Miss Jessica Jenks, sopranos; Miss 
Laura Fleming, Miss Anna Millar- and Miss Henrietta 
Millar, altos; Mr. Philo A. Otis and Mr. Frederick J. 
Wessels, tenors; Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. F. H. 
Atkinson, Jr., basses; Mr. Leopold Kramer^ (violin), Mr. 
Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

Christmas sermon by Dr. Chichester. Text: "But thou, Beth- 
lehem Ephratah, though thou be little among the thou- 

' Miss White was soloist at the "Messiah" concert, by the Apollo Musical Club, 
December 30, 1899. 

2 Miss Millar was manager of the Thomas Orchestra (1895-98), is now engaged 
in the real estate business in Tlorida and on Long Island, N. Y. She resides in 
Rockville Centre, Long Island, N. Y. 

3 Mr. Leopold Kramer was concert mcister of the Thomas Orchestra (1897-1910). 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 107 

sands of Judah, yet out of thee shall He come forth unto 
me that is to be ruler in Israel; whose goings forth have 
been from of old, from everlasting." (Micah v: 2.) 

1898 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble (S.), Mrs. Christine N. 
Dreier (A.), Mr. William S. Hine (T.), Mr. Edward A. 
Allen (B.). Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

January 30 — 

Prelude— "Pastorale in F" ----- Lucas 

Anthem — "Deus Misereatur in E" - Horatio \V. Parker 
Response — "Lead, Kindlv Light" - - - Stainer 

Offertory— "The Lord is My Light" ----- Buck 

Mrs. Trimble and Mr. Hine. 
Postlude — "Prelude and Fugue in E Minor" - - Bach 

February 20 — Dr. Chichester's sermon was on the life and 
influence of George Washington. 

March 30 — Wednesday afternoon; funeral services of Mr. 
Henry Botsford, conducted by Dr. Chichester. Mrs. 
Trimble and Miss Evans sang familiar hymns. 

April 10 — Easter Celebration : 

Prelude — "Pastorale in E" - - - - - Lemare 

Anthem — "Happy and Blest" (from "St. Paul") 

--------- Mendelssohn 

Anthem — "As it Began to Dawn" - - - Vincent 
Anthem — "Awake, Glad Soul, Awake" - - Foster 

Violoncello Solo — "Adagio" - - - _ Mozart 

Offertory — "Easter Hymn" - - - _ Roeder 

Mrs. Trimble, accompanied by violoncello and organ. 
Anthem — "This is the Day the Lord Hath Made" Otis 

Accompanied by violoncello and organ. 
Postlude — "Grand Chorus in D" _ _ _ HoUins 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss E. M. Goodman, Miss 
Edith Goodwin, Miss Hortense Mallory and Miss Ruth 
Wilson, sopranos; Miss Bessie Campbell, Miss Florence 
Campbell and Miss Daisy J. Hubbard, altos; Mr. Philo 
A. Otis and Mr. F. J. Wessels, tenors; Mr. Charles T. 
Atkinson and Mr. F. H. Atkinson, Jr., basses; Mr. Bruno 
Steindel (violoncello). Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

Sermon by Dr. Chichester. Text, "And very early in the 
morning, the first day of the week, they came unto the 
sepulchre at the rising of the sun." (St. Mark xvi: 2.) 

May 1 — Messrs. Hine and Allen having resigned, are suc- 
ceeded by Mr. Glenn Hall (T.) and Mr. Alfred Williams 
(B.). 



108 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

May 22— 

Offertory — "My Song Shall be Ahvay Thy Mercy" 

--------- Mendelssohn 

(From "The Hymn of Praise.") 
Mrs. Trimble and Mr. Hall. 

Sermon by Dr. Chichester on the life and work of Mr. Glad- 
stone. Text, "For David, after he had served his own 
generation by the will of God, fell on sleep." (Acts 
xiii: 36.) 

June 19— 

Anthem — "The Righteous Shall Flourish" - Calkin 

The Minister's text was the exclamation of Elijah, "It is 
enough; now, O Lord, take away my life," uttered by 
the prophet when he went into the wilderness, weary, 
alone, broken in body and spirit and ready to die. (I 
Kings xix: 4.) 

June 26 — The sermon was on that passage of St. Paul's 
letter to the Ephesians (vi: 11-17), in which the Apostle 
makes use of military expressions: "Put on the whole 
armour of God," etc. 

July 17— Mr. Charles D. Irwin (O.). 

Prelude — "Andante con Variazioni" - - - Calkin 

Offertory — "Love Divine, all Love Excelling" - Stainer 

Mrs. Trimble and Mr. James Swift. 
Postlude — "Processional March" _ _ - Whitney 

Dr. Chichester on his vacation. The Rev. Sylvester Scovel, 
D. D., Worcester, Ohio, preacher. Subject, "The Martyr 
Spirit." Text, "And they stoned Stephen." (Acts vii: 
59-60.) 

July 31 — The Rev. L. F. Laverty of Los Angeles, Cal., 
preacher. The speaker said the present war with Spain 
will call the attention of the whole world to the power 
of the Anglo-Saxon race. In 1700, the Anglo-Saxon 
people numbered 6,000,000; in 1800, 20,000,000; in 1900, 
there will be 115,000,000. 

August 28 — 

Offertory — "Be Thou Faithful unto Death" Mendelssohn 

(From "St. Paul".) 

Mr. James Swift. 

The Rev. John C. Watt, D. D., First Presbyterian Church, 
Columbus, Ohio, preacher. 

September 11 — The Rev, S. C. Palmer, D. D., preacher. 
Text, "What shall I do for thee? what hast thou in the 
house?" (II Kings iv: 2.) 




ELIOT CHURCH. XEWTi 
Charles D. Irwin at the 



\. MASS. 
irgan. 



PULPIT A.\D CHOIR. 109 

September 25 — 

Offertory — "If With All Your Hearts" - Mendelssohn 
(From "Elijah.") 
Mr. Glenn Hall. 

The ]\Iinister spoke on the text, "Owe no man anything." 
(Romans xiii: 8.) 

October 23 — 

Anthem— "Still, Still With Thee" _ - - Foote 

The Minister spoke of the influence of heredity, environment 
and individual responsibility in moulding man's character. 
The Prophet Ezekiel says (xviii: 2-4): "What mean 
ye, that ye use this proverb concerning the land of 
Israel, saying, the fathers have eaten sour grapes, and 
the children's teeth are set on edge?" etc. 

November 13 — 

Anthem — "Te Deum in B Minor" _ _ _ _ Buck 
Anthem — "Let not your Heart be Troubled" - Trembath 
Offertory — "The Lord is my Light and my Salvation" 
----------- Buck- 
Mrs. Dreier and Mr. Williams. 

The Minister spoke on the subject, "How to Interest Young 
Men in Church Work." There are 8,000,000 young men 
in this country today; twenty-five per cent go to Church; 
five per cent are Church members and only three per 
cent give anything to the support of the Gospel. Text, 
"Run, speak to this young man." (Zech. ii:4.) 

The Rev. W. J. McCaughan began his labors today, as Min- 
ister of the Third Presbyterian Church. 

November 27 — 

Offertory — "O, Saviour, Hear Me" - - - Gluck 

Mr. Hall, with violin obligato by Miss Marian Carpenter. 

December 4 — 

Anthem- — "While the Earth Remaineth" - John A. West 

The Minister spoke on Foreign Missions, taking for his text, 
"To what purpose is this waste?" (St. Matt, xxvi: 8). 
This was the exclamation of the disciples in the house 
of Simon the leper, as they witnessed the woman break 
the alabaster box of precious ointment and pour it on 
the head of our Saviour. The same question is asked 
today regarding the expenditure of large sums annually 
in the mission field. What about our Church edifices, 
their elaborate fittings, colored windows and costly 
music? Why "this waste"? 



110 • PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Organ recital at 3:30 P. M., in the Church, by Mr. Francis S. 
Moore, assisted by Mr. Glenn Hall. 

December 15 and 16 — Thursday and Friday evenings, Mr. 
Tracy C. Drake gave his lecture, "With a Kodak in 
Japan, China and Hawaii," in the Church parlors for 
the benefit of the Bureau of Associated Charities, the 
Marguerite Ayres Kindergarten at Kioto, Japan, and the 
Sunday-school of the Church. The lecture was illus- 
trated with many beautifully colored views. 

December 25 — Christmas Celebration : 

Prelude — "The Pastoral Symphony" _ _ _ Bach 

Carol— "Sing the Holy Christ-Child" - - Foster 

Anthem— "O Zion, that Tellest Good Tidings" - Buck 
Carol — "Christ is Born, the Angels Sing" - - - Otis 
Violoncello Solo — "Adagio" _ _ _ Golterman 

Offertory— "The Christ Child" - - - - Coombs 

Mr. Glenn Hall, accompanied by vioUn and organ. 

Anthem — "O Come, Redeemer of Mankind" John E. West 

Organ Postlude — "And the Glory of the Lord" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Grace E. Dudley, 
Miss Lura E. Hathaway and Miss Elizabeth Dunlap, 
sopranos; Miss Helen Burton and Miss Nellie E. Murphy, 
altos; Mr. Philo A. Otis and Mr. Frederick J. Wessels, 
tenors; Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. F. H. Atkinson, 
Jr., basses; Miss Marian Carpenter (violin); Mr. Bruno 
Steindel (violoncello) . 

Sermon by Dr. Chichester. Text, "Mary, the Mother of Jesus." 
(Acts i: 14.) 

1899 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble (S.), Mrs. Christine N. 
Dreier (A.), Mr. Glenn Hall (T.), and Mr. Alfred Williams 
(B.). Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

During the absence of Mr. Hall in the summer, his place 
was filled by Mr. Alfred RoUo. 
January 8 — 

Prelude— "Priere" ----- Boellman 

Anthem — "Great is our Lord" - - - - Foster 

Anthem— "He Will Forgive" ----- Moir 
Offertory — "Behold! What Manner of Love" - - Armes 

Mrs. Trimble and Mr. Hall. 
Postlude— "March in C" ------ Bossi 

January 29 — 

Anthem— "Thou, O Lord, Art Praised in Zion" Selby. 



PULPIT A\'D CHOIR. Ill 

The Minister spoke from the text, "Having a good consci- 
ence." (I Peter iii: IG.) 

February 12 — 

Anthem — "The Father's Promise" - - - Rutenl)er 

Offertory — "The Soft Southern Breeze" - - Barnby 

Mr. Glenn Hall. 

The Minister spoke on "Home Missions and the Modern 
City." Text, "Except the Lord keep the city." (Ps. 
cxxvii: 1.) 

Dr. Josiah Strong, author of the work, "Our Country," has 
given much thought to the depopulation of the country 
districts for the benefit of the cities. The working peo- 
ple flock to the cities, where living is cheaper. "It is 
possible," says Dr. Strong, "to support life in New York 
City on four cents a day; bed, one cent; breakfast, one 
cent; dinner, one cent and supper, one cent. Another 
cent will buy a newspaper." Dr. Chichester stated that 
one hundred years ago only one person out of thirty 
lived in the city; fifty years ago, one out of twelve. 
Today (1900) the country districts in New England are 
almost deserted, so great is the rush to the city. The 
Chicago directory of 1830 contained a voting list of 
thirty names. The population, now (1900) is 1,800,000. 
Forty per cent of the people in Massachusetts now live 
in the city of Boston and the suburbs. The improve- 
ment in farm machinery is one cause for the desertion 
of the country districts. Four men can now do the work 
on the farm, which fifty years ago required fourteen. 
There are over one million foreigners in Chicago, and 
only one Church for 5,000 people. There are several dis- 
tricts, each containing 40,000 foreigners, without a 
Church of any kind. All the Church buildings and mis- 
sion schools in Chicago will seat only 800,000. The rest 
of the population of 1,000,000, cannot go to Church at 
all. Queen Victoria says the Bible is the source of 
England's prosperity and success. Dr. Chichester assigned 
two reasons for the destitution and poverty in our 
cities: man's environment and man himself. 

April 2 — Easter Celebration : 

Prelude — "Hymn to St. Cecelia" _ _ _ Gounod 

Chorale — "For us, the Christ is Made a Victim Availing" 

---------- Gounod 

Anthem — "Xow is Christ Risen" - - John E. West 

Anthem — "The Lord Shall Comfort Zion" - Lutkin 

Trio — "Easter Song" _______ otis 

For violin, violoncello and organ. 



112 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Offertory — "I Know that My Redeemer Liveth" Handel 
Mrs. Trimble, accompanied by violin, violoncello and organ 
Anthem — "Shout, Ye High Heavens" - - Chad\vick 
Organ Postlude — "AUelulia in E Flat" - - Dubois 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. Fanny U. Pine, Mrs. 
Virginia Evans, Miss Elizabeth Dunlap and Miss Sarah 
Munson, sopranos; Miss Jennie F. Johnson, Miss Edna M. 
Barnes, Miss Anna Houser and Miss E. W. Ockenga, 
altos; Mr. Philo A. Otis and Mr. Frederick J. Wessels, 
tenors; Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. H. B. Harvey, 
basses; Mr. Emil Bare^ (violin); Mr. Bruno Steindel 
(violoncello). 

Easter sermon by the Minister. Subject, "The Immortal Life." 
(I Cor. XV : 53.) 

ApriIv 9 — 

Offertory — "Forever With the Lord" - - Gounod 

Mrs. Dreier. 

The subject of the sermon was, "The True Imitation of 
Christ." The Minister's text was the exclamation of 
King Saul to the witch of Endor: "For the Philistines 
make war against me, and God is departed from me," etc. 
(I Samuel xxviii: 15.) 

April 23— 

Anthem — "I Will Mention" _ _ _ _ Sullivan 

The Choir was assisted in this number by Mr. Henry A. 
Mix (T.).' 

Dr. Chichester spoke on "The Inspiration of Visions." The 
prophet Joel says, "Your sons and your daughters shall 
prophesy, your old men shall dream dreams, your young 
men shall see visions." (Joel ii : 28.) There are two classes 
of men, the practical and the visionary. The sermon was 
a plea for the dreamer, on whom most of us look with 
small favor. Where no vision is, the people perish. 
Galileo, Newton, Columbus, Tyndall, Lincoln — all were 
dreamers. 

April 30— 

Anthem — "Great is our Lord" - - - - Foster 

The Minister's subject was, "The Privileges of Christian 
Faith." Text, "And these things shall follow them that 
believe," etc. (St. Mark xvi: 17-18.) 

' Mr. Emil Bare was second concert meister of the Thomas Orchestra (1897- 
1901). He is now (1913) with the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Budapest. 

^ Mr. Henry .\. Mix is now (1913) a member of the Choir of the Second Presby- 
terian Church, Chicago. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 113 

May 7 — 

Anthem— "O Come, let us Worship" - - - Mendelssohn 
(From "The Ninety-fifth Psalm.") 

Dr. IMcPherson tendered his resignation this morning as Min- 
ister of the Second Presbyterian Church, to become head 
master of the school at Lawrenceville, N. J. 

May 14 — The Minister's sermon was on the text, "When thou 
buildest a new house, then thou shalt make a battlement 
for thy roof." (Deut. xxii: 8.) Dr. Chichester in con- 
clusion made an earnest appeal for the work of Railroad 
Chapel; §2,000 subscribed. 

June 11— Children's Day. The Minister preached to the 
little folks on the text: "And behold, there was a swarm 
of bees." (Judges xiv: S). An instructive talk to the 
grown-ups as well. There are "B's" today which will 
yield good results, with a little attention; "Be diligent," 
"Be watchful," "Be courteous," "Be of good cheer." 

June 25— Subject of the sermon, "Orthodoxy." The Apostle 
Paul in his letter to Titus, says, "But speak thou the 
things which become sound doctrine." (Titus ii: 1.) 

A tablet has been placed in the Church during the past week, 
bearing this inscription: 

In Memory of 

Asa Page Kellev, 

1822-189:3. 

Some Time ax Elder ix this Church. 

This Tablet is Erected 

By His Daughter, 
Mary Kelley Shufeldt. 

July 16— The Rev. David C. Marquis, D. D.,^ of the Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary, preacher. Text, "I 
know thy works, and where thou dwellest, even where 
Satan's seat is." (Rev. ii: 13.) 

July 23-30— The Rev.W. N. Page, D. D., of Fort Leavenworth, 
Kansas, preacher. 
The Church was closed during the month of August. 

September 3-10— Dr. Hartley of La Porte, Ind., preacher. 

September 17 — Dr. Chichester resumed his work this morn- 
ing, subject, "Spiritual Effectiveness." He referred to 
the raising of the Shunammite's son by Elisha. (II 
Kings iv.) Church members are too apt in this day to 

1 Dr. Marquis retired from the Seminan' in 1909; died in Chicago, October 8, 
1912. 



114 PULPIT A\'D CHOIR. 

do good through others, as Elisha sent Gehazi, instead 
of going himseh'. There is too much dependence today 
on committees, boards and other elaborate organiza- 
tions; too Httle personal responsibility. The General As- 
sembly report (1S94) showed a net increase for the pre- 
ceding year of 40,000 members. In 1896 this increase 
had dropped to 20,000. In 1897 the increase was only 
13,000. For the year ending May, 1899, this increase 
had fallen to 8,000. 

September 17 — Sunday afternoon; funeral services of Mr. 
Edward Allen Packard, conducted by Dr. Chichester. 
Mrs. Christine N. Dreier sang the hymns, "Lead, Kindly 
Light" and "Abide with Me." 

Mr. Packard was admitted to the membership of this 
Church, March 26, 1866, by letter from the First Congrega- 
tional Church of Stockton, N. Y. 

October 29 — 

Offertory — "The Woods and Every Sweet Smelling Tree" 
--------- John E. West 

Dr. Chichester spoke on the "Reserve Forces of Life." Text, 
"Then shall the kingdom of heaven be likened unto ten 
virgins, which took their lamps, and went forth to meet 
the bridegroom," etc. (St. Matthew xxv: 1, 2.) 

November 12 — 

Offertory — "The Ninety and Nine" - - - Campion 
Mr. Glenn Hall. 

The Minister spoke on "Environment" as one of the influ- 
ences in shaping human life. Text, "For in Him we 
live, and move, and have our being." (Acts xvii: 28.) 

Four influences shape human life: (1) Heredity; (2) En- 
vironment; (3) Man's Own Will; (4) Divine Help. There 
are three sorts of people in the world: "Wills," "Won'ts" 
and "Can'ts." 

November 18 — Saturday afternoon; funeral services of Mr. 
Franklin Van Tuyl Chamberlain at his late residence in 
Evanston, conducted by Dr. Chichester, and Dr. Boyd 
of the First Presbyterian Church of Evanston. 

Mr. Chamberlain was born in Seneca Falls, N. Y., De- 
cember 26, 1820. He came to Chicago in 1849, and, with 
his wife, was admitted to membership in this Church, March 
9, 1850. He was elected an Elder, February 27, 1853, and 
was Clerk of the Session from June 27, 1853, to March 25, 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 115 

1861; succeeded by Mr. E. S. Wells. In ISGl, he removed to 
Cincinnati, returning to Chicago in 1878, when he was again 
chosen an Elder, retaining the office until his death, Novem- 
ber 16, 1899. 

November 30 — Thursday morning. Union Thanksgiving 
service of the Plymouth Congregational, Trinity M. E., 
First Christian, First and Second Presbyterian Churches, 
held in the First Presbyterian Church : 

Prelude — "Andante in D" - - - - - Hollins 

Anthem — "O God, Who is Like Unto Thee" - Foster 

Solo — "A Song of Thanksgiving" _ _ _ Allitsen 

Mrs. Dreier. 
Offertory — "My Song Shall be Alway Thy Mercy" 

--------- Mendelssohn 

Miss Mary P. Thomson and Mr. Hall. 

Postlude — "Harvest Thanksgiving March" - Calkin 

Mr. Moore. 

Sermon by the Rev. W. G. McLennan, D. D., Minister of 
Trinity M. E. Church. Text, "Bless the Lord, O my 
soul; and all that is within me, bless His holy name." 
(Psalm ciii: 1.) 

December 24 — Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude — "Hymn to St. CeceUa" _ - _ Gounod 

Violin, violoncello and organ. 
Anthem — "There Were Shepherds" - - - Chadwick 
Carol — "Christ is Born, the Angels Sing" - - - Otis 
Anthem — "It Came upon the Midnight Clear" Stainer 

Violoncello — "Romanza" ----- Becker 

Mr. Bruno Steindel. 
Offertory— "The Nativity" ----- Shelley 

With accompaniment for violin and organ. 
Mrs. Christine N. Dreier. 
Sermon— "The Wise Men and the Babe"— Rev. W. J. Chi- 
chester, D. D. 
Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - _ _ Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. Virginia Evans, Miss 
Grace E. Dudley, Miss Mary Hansel and Miss Normanda 
Hvale, sopranos; Miss Nellie Murphy, Miss Anna Read 
and Miss Julia Clark, altos; Mr. John E. Walker, Mr. 
Philo A. Otis and Mr. F. J. Wessels, tenors; I\Ir. Charles 
T. Atkinson, Mr. F. H. Atkinson, Jr.,^ and Mr. Arthur 
T. Scott, basses; Mr. Leon Marx- (violin); INIr. Bruno 
Steindel (violoncello) . 

1 Mr. F. H. Atkinson, Jr.. since July, 1906, Ass't Paymaster. U. S. N.; has served 
on the Atlantic and Pacific squadrons. Mr. .A.tkinson is the author of a number of 
popular songs. 

2 Mr. Leon Marx was a member of the Thomas Orchestra (1898-1911). 



116 PULPIT AXD CHOIR. 

1900 

The Choir : Mrs. Clara G. Trimble (S.), Mrs. Christine N. Dreier 
(A.), Mr. Glenn Hall (T.), Mr. Alfred Williams (B.) and 
Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

January 21— The Rev. E. H. Curtis, D. D., preacher. Sub- 
ject, "The trial of your faith." (I Peter i: 7.) 

February 11 — Dr. Chichester spoke of Hezekiah "as the 
Oliver Cromwell of the Old Testament," to whom we 
owe much of our religious freedom today. 

March 11— Second Presbyterian Church destroyed by fire 
Thursday night, last. By invitation of Dr. Chichester, 
members of the Second Church with their Assistant Min- 
ister, the Rev. C. A. Lippincott, worshipped with us 
this A. M. 

March 14 — Wednesday afternoon, funeral services of Mrs. 
Antoinette W. Freer, widow of Mr. L. C. P. Freer, at the 
residence of ]\Ir. O. K. Johnson, 4527 Greenwood avenue. 
Rlrs. Freer died Sunday, March 11. She was received 
into the membership of the First Church, April 5, 1845, 
and at the time of her death was the oldest member. 

April 15 — Easter Service: 

Prelude — "Meditation" _ _ _ _ Bach-Gounod 

Anthem — "Behold, Ye Despisers" - - H. W. Parker 
Easter Carol — "The Return of Spring" - - - Otis 
Anthem — "O Jesus, Thou Art Standing" - - Foster 

Violoncello Solo — "Romanza" - - - - Sokalow 

Mr. Steindel. 
Offertory — "Ye Bells of Easter Day" - - Dressier 

Mr. Hall. 

Sermon — "The Influence of Immortality on the Present 

Earthly Existence." Text, "The power of an endless 

Ufe." (Hebrews vii: 16.) Rev. \V. J. Chichester, D. D. 

Anthem — "Shout, Ye High Heavens" - - Chadwick 

Postlude — "And the Glory of the Lord" - - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. W. E. Barnes, Miss 
Grace E. Dudley, Miss Normanda Hvale, Miss Lura E. 
E. Hatheway and Miss Leslie R. Preston, sopranos; Mrs. 
Jennie M. Affeld, Miss Clara L. Gibson, Miss Etta C. 
Levin, altos; Mr. H. A. Mix and Mr. F. J. Wessels, 
tenors; Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, Mr. Arthur T. Scott 
and Mr. Henry H. Schueler, basses; Mr. Alexander 
Krauss (violin) and Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello). ]\Ir. 
Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 




SECOND PRESBYTERIAN- CHURCH, 
inu-r iif Michigan Avenue and Twentieth Street, as it appeared on the 
morning tolli.wing the lire of March 8. 1900. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 117 

The cost for additional voices and instrumental players 
at all festival services is borne by a few men and women of 
the Congregation. 

April 22 — The Minister's sermon this morning was on the 
subject, "Christian Contentment." Text, "I have learned 
to be content." (Phil, iv: 11.) Few passages in all 
literature are so full of peace and light as this verse in 
Paul's letter. The whole Epistle is akin in spirit to 
Izaak Walton's "Compleat Angler," or Baxter's "Saint's 
Rest." (Baxter was Chaplain in Cromwell's army.) 
The word "rejoice" is used by Paul twelve times in this 
Epistle. 

April 29 — Dr. Chichester spoke on IMethodism and the ^I. E. 
Conference which meets this week in Chicago. Text, 
"There was a man sent from God." (St. John 1: 6.) 
Methodism began November, 1729, in John Wesley's 
room, at Oxford. Wesley had at the time of his death, 
March 2, 1791, 110,000 followers. In 1900, there were 
25,000,000 Methodists in the world. 

May 13 — The bulletin announces the death, May 7, 1900, of 
Mrs. A. P. Kelley, an old member of this Church. 

May 31 — Thursday evening. Organ recital in the Church by 
jMr. Francis S. Moore, assisted by INIr. Alexander Krauss 
(vioHn) and the "Boy Soprano," Master Leslie Mayne. 

June 17— 

Prelude — "Priere in G Flat" _ _ _ _ Lemaigre 
Anthem — "Thou Visitest the Earth" - - Barnby 

Miss Tina Mae Haines (O.)- 

July S— 

At the evening service in the Second Presbyterian Church, 
the Rev. Pleasant Hunter, D. D., the new Minister, 
spoke from the text, "O Daniel, a man greatly beloved." 
(Daniel x: 11.) 

July 15— The Rev. E. Trumbull Lee, D. D., of Cincinnati, 
Ohio, preacher. Subject, "Faith." (James ii: 1.) 

July 22 — Sermon by Dr. Page of Leavenworth, Kansas, who 
spoke on "The Personal Presence of Jesus Christ," as 
shown in the words of St. Mark, "He could not be hid." 
(St. Markvii: 24). The preacher referred to the persist- 
ent force of power as manifested in the case of Oliver 
Cromwell and other great m.en. 

September 16 — Dr. Chichester in the pulpit, after the sum- 
mer vacation; spoke on the recent disaster at Galveston. 



118 PULPIT A\'D CHOIR. 

Text, "For when Thy judgments are in the earth," 
(Isaiah xxvi: 9). Are Christians to regard this calamity 
as a punishment on the people of that city for their sins? 
Divine judgments are the result of breaking Divine laws; 
rather, they are the result of neglect in taking reasonable 
human precautions. 

September 23 — 

Offertory — "A Ballad of the Trees and the Master" 

---------- Chadwick 

Mr. Williams. 
Mr. Charles D. Irwin (O.). 

October 7 — Dr. Chichester chose for his subject, "Cross- 
Bearing," using the words of the Apostle Mark, "Who- 
ever will come after me," etc. The Minister referred to 
the Crusaders and their conquest of Palestine. Our 
word "saunter" is derived from the French "Saint Terre" 
("Holy Land"), having reference to the Knights loiter- 
ing, "sauntering" on their way to and from the Holy 
Land. 

November 25 — Mr. Clarence Eddy, organist of the Church 
(1879-1895), was present this morning. After the last 
hymn. Dr. Chichester spoke of Mr. Eddy's long service 
with the Church, and said the people would love to see 
him in his old place at the organ. After the benediction, 
Mr. Eddy played a portion of Widor's "Second Sym- 
phony," and the "Meditation" by d'Evry. 

December 23 — Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude — ^"Christmas Pastoral" - - - - Whiting 

Anthem — "Angels, from the Realms of Glory" Cowen 

Carol — "In the Field with Their Flocks Abiding" 

--------- John E. West 

Anthem — "Calm on the List'ning Ear of Night" 

--------- H. W. Parker 

Violin Solo — "Cavatina" ______ Raflf 

Mr. Krauss. 
Offertory — "Christmas Song" _____ Adam 

Mr. Hall. 
Violin Solo — "Meditation" - - - - Bach-Gounod 

Mr. Krauss. 
Accompanied by violoncello, harp and organ. 
Christmas Sermon — Rev. W. J. Chichester, D. D. 
Anthem — "O Sing to God" ----- Gounod 

Organ Postlude — "Triumphal March" - - Dubois 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Grace E. Dudley, 
Miss Carolyn Mason, INIiss Grace Jones, Miss Rebecca M. 
Whitehead and Miss Lura E. Hatheway, sopranos; Mrs. 
C. K. Harmon, Mrs. Augusta Posner, Miss Clara Halla- 



PULPIT ASD CHOIR. 119 

day and Miss Gcrmaine H. Ames, altos; ^Ir. L. A. Bow- 
man, Mr. Lawrence Proudfoot, Jr., and Mr. Henry O. 
Price, tenors; Mr. Arthur T. Scott, Mr. Charles T. Atkin- 
son and Mr. Frank Pearson, basses. IMr. Alexander 
Kruass (violin), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), and 
Mrs. M. Wunderle (harp). Mr. PhilojAdams Otis, choir- 
master. 

1901 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble (S.), :\Irs. Christine N. Dreier 
(A.), Mr. Glenn Hall (T.), Mr. Alfred Williams (B.), Mr. 
Francis S. Moore (O.). 

January 20 — Miss Grace E. Dudley (S.) assisted. 

Anthem — "Thou Earth, Waft Sweet Incense" Spohr 

The Minister spoke on "The Limitations of Ijfe." St. John 
says (Rev. i: 5): "I, John, was in the isle that is 
called Patmos." Life has its boundaries, as this small 
island was bounded by the blue Aegean waters. We 
are today prisoners of time, place, passion and sin. 
The preacher referred to the great power of heredity. 

February 10 — The Minister spoke on Home Missions. Text, 
"The King himself is served by the field." (Eccl. v: 9.) 
Out of a pupulation of 1,855,000 in Chicago (1900), only 
500,000 are of American birth. There are twice as many 
Irish today in America as there are in all Ireland. 

February 17 — A fierce snowstorm. The service this morn- 
ing was in the interest of the Citizens' League. The 
jMinister spoke on "Civic Righteousness." Text, "And 
he cried mightily with a strong voice, saying, 'Babylon 
the great is fallen.' " (Rev. xviii: 2.) Efficiency in 
office is the one plain, unalterable rule for all private 
business and it ought to be the rule for all civic adminis- 
tration. The city is simply a great corporation in which 
every property owner is a stockholder. 

February 24 — 

Anthem— "I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes" - - Henschel 

Offertory — "Be Thou Faithful Unto Death" Mendelssohn 

Mr. Hall. 

April 7 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude — "Largo" ------- Handel 

Viohn, violoncello and organ. 
Anthem — "Now is Christ Risen" - - John E. West 

Easter Hymn — "Sweetly, the Birds are Singing" Goodrich 
Anthem— "Behold, Ye Despisers" - - H. W. Parker 
Violoncello Solo — "Air in D" - - - - - Bach 

- Mr. Steindel. 



120 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Offertory — "Easter Morning" _ - _ - _ Qtis 

Mrs. Dreier. 

Organ Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir, (]\Ir. Frank M. Coffin (T.) in the absence 
of Mr. Glenn Hall), was assisted by Mrs. J. N. Van Pelt, 
Miss Grace E. Dudley, Miss Grace Jones, Miss Carolyn 
Mason, Miss Pearl Coe and Miss Rebecca M. Whitehead, 
sopranos; Mrs. C. K. Harmon, Miss Germaine H. Ames,^ 
Miss Clara Halladay and Miss Etta C. Levin, altos; Mr. 
J. B. Miller, Mr. Lawrence Proudfoot, Jr., and Mr. F. J. 
Wessels, tenors; Mr. Frank Pearson, Mr. Charles T. At- 
kinson and Mr. Henry H. Schueler, basses. Mr. Alex- 
ander Krauss (violin), and Mr. Bruno Steindel (violon- 
cello). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

April 28 — A lovely spring day. Mr. Coffin (T.), in the ab- 
sence of Mr. Hall. The Minister's text was, "Not sloth- 
ful in business." (Romans xii: IE) Hall Caine wrote 
"The Christian" to prove that Christianity is impossible 
as society is now constituted. The world is too wicked. 
"Religion in business," said the Minister, "is not incom- 
patible, but religion in business does not always mean 
success in business." 

May 12 — The Rev. John H. Barrows, D. D., preacher. Text, 
"Our Father who art in Heaven." (St. Luke xi: 2.) 

May 19 — Dr. Chichester spoke on the parable, "The wither- 
ing of the fig tree," (St. Matt, xxi: 19). Christ came not to 
destroy, but to build up, to heal. This miracle is quite 
exceptional in the life of Christ. 

June 2 — 

Anthem — "There is a Fountain Filled with Blood" - Otis 
Dr. Chichester spoke on the work of the late General As- 
sembly and the "Revision of the Westminster Confes- 
sion." Text, "And the apostles and the elders came 
together for to consider of this matter." (Acts xv: 6.) 
The General Assembly is republican in its form of gov- 
ernment. The 600 members are divided into two great 
parties, Conservatives and Radicals. In 1800, the Pres- 
byterian Church in the United States had less than 
12,000 members; now there are over one million. 

BAPTIZED 

By the Rev. W. J. Chichester, D. D. 

James Otis — Son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph C. Otis. 

Otis Buckingham — Son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Buckingham. 



Miss Germaine H. Ames, afterward, Mrs. Glenn Hall. 




GI.EXX HALL. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 121 

Julys — Friday. I attended the funeral services of the Rev. 
Franklin W. Fisk, D. D., at 4 P. M., in Fisk Hall of the Chi- 
cago Seminary. Dr. Fisk passed away yesterday, July 4, 
in his eighty-second year. After graduating from Yale, he 
came to Beloit College, Wisconsin, and later to Chicago, 
as professor in the new Chicago Seminary. Dr. Fisk will 
always be held in grateful remembrance by the people of 
the First Church for his faithful work with them as 
permanent supply after the removal of Dr. Mitchell to 
Cleveland in 1S80. 

July 21— 

Anthem — "In Dreams I've Heard the Seraphs" Faure 

Preacher, the Rev. E. B. Newcomb of Keokuk, Iowa. Text, 
"But the things which are not seen are eternal." (II 
Cor. iv: 18.) 

September 22 — Dr. Chichester resumed his work, speaking 
on the "Parable of the Talents." Text, "And Hkewise he 
that had received two, he also gained other two." (St. 
Matt. XXV : 17.) Many men go through life with few 
chances and opportunities, having two talents and only 
make a moderate success. Such are the plain people 
whom Abraham Lincoln said the Lord must have loved, 
for he made so many of them. 

October 13— 

Anthem — "O God, Have Mercy" _ _ _ Calkin 

Mr. Glenn Hall and quartette. 

Dr. Chichester spoke on the theme, "The Repose Needed in 
Spiritual Life." Text, "Take heed and be quiet." (Is. 
vii: 4.) 

December 1 — Dr. Chichester spoke on "Divine Economy." 
Text, "Gather up the fragments." (St. John vi: 12.) 
The great problem of the twentieth century is economic 
production. 

December 22— Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude — Largo from "The New World Symphony" 

---------- Dvorak 

Anthem — "O Zion, that Tellest" - - - Buck 

Anthem — "Hark, the Glad Sound" - - - Foster 

Offertory— "O Little Town of Bethlehem" - Otis 

Mr. Hall. 
Christmas Sermon — Rev. \V. J. Chichester, D. D. 
Anthem — "Calm on the List'ning Ear of Night" 

--------- H. W. Parker 

Organ Postlude— "And the Glory of the Lord" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 



122 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Rebecca M. White- 
head/ Miss Mignon Demerest and INIiss Blanche Gilson, 
sopranos; Miss Etta C. Levin, Mrs. O. M. Post and Mrs. 
Sarah R. Haight, altos; Mr. Thomas Abercrombie, Mr. 
W. T. Matthias and Mr. Frederick J. Wessels, tenors; 
Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. Henry H. Schueler, 
basses; Mr. Alexander Krauss (violin), Mr. Bruno Stein- 
del (violoncello), Mr. Alfred Ouensel (flute), Mr. Leopold 
de Mare (French horn). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choir- 
master. 

1902 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble (S.), Mrs. Christine N. Dreier 
(A.), Mr. Glenn Hall (T.), Mr. Alfred Williams (B.), Mr. 
Francis S. Moore (O.). 

January 12 — 

Prelude — "Cantilene" ----- Rheinberger 
Motet — "The Lord Give Ear to Thee" - Rheinberger 

In the afternoon, funeral services of Mary Brewster, wife of 
Mr. George H. Laflin, from her late residence, 1614 
Michigan avenue, conducted by Dr. Chichester, assisted 
by the Church Choir. Mrs. Laflin was born in Pittsfield, 
Mass., of a family line directly descended from Elder 
Brewster of the Mayflower Company. She was deeply 
interested in all the activities of the First Church, es- 
pecially Home and Foreign Missions. For thirty years, 
she had been connected with the management of the 
Home for the Friendless. Mr. and Mrs. George H. Laf- 
lin were admitted to the membership of the First Church, 
December 26, 1S64. Mrs. Laflin died January 10, 1902. 

February 23 — The annual collection for Home Missions. 
The Minister gave some interesting data regarding mod- 
ern city life. 

Life in the city affords great opportunities. The cost of 
living is less. Chicago has less past and more future than 
any other city in the world. The preacher referred to the 
extraordinary growth of the modern city. Paris has doubled 
its population four times in a hundred years. The popula- 
tion of Berlin increases faster than that of any other city in 
Europe. No city in the world has exceeded the growth of 
Chicago, from a population of 300, when Dr. Porter organ- 
ized the First Church in 1833, to fully two million at this 
date (1902). 

> Afterward. Mrs. W. R. Gibbs; resides (1913) in Richmond, Mass. 




;HFH EDWARD oTI^ 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 123 

March 9 — The Choir was assisted by Mr. Milton G. Lutz 
(vioHn). 

Prelude — "Air in D" ------ Bach 

Mr. Lutz. 

Offertory — "The Light of Heaven" - - - Gounod 

Mrs. Trimble, with violin obligate. 

3:00 P. M.: Funeral services of Mr. Joseph E. Otis (died 
March 7), from his late residence, 1730 Prairie avenue, 
conducted by Dr. Chichester, assisted by the Im- 
perial Quartette. Mr. Otis was born in Berlin, Erie 
County, Ohio, April 30, 1S30. His education was ac- 
quired at the common school; later he had a three years' 
course at the Huron Institute in Milan, Ohio. In 1855, 
he was appointed cashier of the Milan Bank (x\ndrews 
& Otis), with which he continued until 1862. While 
living in Milan he married INIaria, daughter of Judge 
Taylor. In ISGO he came to Chicago, and for four years 
had control of a line of vessels on the lakes, carrying 
grain from Chicago to Buffalo. After discharging their 
cargoes of wheat at Buffalo, his schooners would run 
"light" to Erie, Pa., there to load with coal for Chicago. 
Mr. Otis disposed of his vessel interests in 1864, and be- 
gan investments in real estate. He was a member of 
the Common Council of Chicago at the time of the fire 
(1871), having been elected on the Republican ticket 
from the second ward. Mr. and Mrs. Otis were re- 
ceived into the membership of this Church, October 5, 
1866. His widow and four children survive him; Mrs. 
John E. Jenkins, Mr. Joseph E. Otis, Jr., Mr. Ralph C. 
Otis and Mrs. Henry W. Buckingham. 

March 30 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude— "Largo" ------- Handel 

Anthem — "Break Forth Into Joy" _ - - Barnby 
Easter Hymn — "Awake, Glad Soul, Awake" - Foster 

Anthem — "In Heavenly Love Abiding" - H. \V. Parker 
Violin Solo — "Meditation" - - - - Bach-Gounod 

Mr. Krauss. 
Offertory — "Come, See the Place Where Jesus Lay" 

--------- H. \V. Parker 

Mrs. Trimble. 

Easter Sermon — Rev. W. J. Chichester, D. D. 

Anthem — "God Hath Appointed a Day" - - Tours 

Organ Postlude — "And the Glory of the Lord" Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir (Mr. Karl W. Knorr (T.) in the ab- 
sence of Mr. Hall), was assisted by Mrs. W. D. Ferguson, 
Miss Ada M. Smith, Miss Blanche Gilson, and Miss Mig- 
non Demerest, sopranos; I\Irs. J. W. McElroy, Miss Nina 



124 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Ferris, Miss Etta C. Levin and Miss Myrtle Lawton, 
altos; Mr. B. H. Atwood and Mr. Frederick J. Wessels/ 
tenors; Mr. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. Henry H. 
Schueler, basses; Mr. Alexander Krauss (violin), Mr. 
Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. Alfred Quensel (flute), 
Mr. Leopold de Mare (horn), iNIrs. Emma W. Bichl 
(harp). Mr. Philo Adams Otis choirmaster. 

April 20 — The Minister's sermon (subject, "How to Keep 
Young,") was a consolation to those who are in dread of 
the approach of old age. Text, "Thy youth is renewed 
Hke the eagle's" (Ps. ciii: 5). A ceaseless, congenial 
activity is essential for a happy old age. 

May 4 — The Minister spoke on "The Good Shepherd." 
Text, "Our Lord Jesus, that great Shepherd." (He- 
brews xiii: 20.) The people of Palestine and Syria had 
much of their wealth in sheep and cattle, hence the con- 
stant use of these words in the Scriptures. The old 
Romans had so much of their wealth in flocks and herds 
that the Latin words, in common parlance, for sheep 
and money, were almost synonomous. 

May 25— 

Anthem— "Let us now Fear the Lord, Our God" 

--------- John E. West 

Offertory — "O Saviour, Hear Me" - - _ Gluck 

Mr. Hall. 

Postlude — "Fugue in C Minor" _ _ _ Bach 

Mr. Moore. 

The Minister spoke of the recent earthquake in the island of 
Martinique and the general subject of such disturbances 
in nature. Why does God allow such calamities to hap- 
pen? Dr. Chichester referred to the falling of the tower 
in Siloam, as narrated in St. Luke (xiii: 4-5). 

May 26 — Monday. The evening papers announced the seri- 
ous illness of Dr. Barrows at Oberhn, Ohio. 

June 3 — Tuesday. Telegram from Miss Mary Eleanor Bar- 
rows: "Father died at two o'clock this A. M." It is too 
sudden and sad for belief. 

June 8 — Sunday morning. Memorial service for Dr. Bar- 
rows, conducted by Dr. Chichester, assisted by the Choir. 
Prelude — "Funeral March" ----- Chopin 

Anthem— Chorale, "To Thee, O Lord, I Yield ] 
My Spirit" - _ _ _ | 

Recitative, "And theWitnesses had [ Af„„j^i,^ ,i,„ 
T -J T^ .-t • r^i ^t >> r Mcndelssohn 

Laid Down their Clothes - f 

Chorus, "Happy and Blest" (From I 

"St. Paul") - - - - J 

' Mr. I-rederick J. Wessels has been manager of the Thomas Orchestra since 




HKXRV M SHEKWOdD. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 125 

Anthein — "And God Shall Wipe Away all Tears" Harris 
Offertory — "Be Thou Faithful Unto Death" Mendelssohn 

Mr. Hall. 

Postlude — "Dead March," ("Saul") - - - Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

June 22— 

Anthem — "The Woods and Every Sweet Smelling 

Tree" ------- John E. West 

Offertory — "I Will Mention" - - - Sullivan 

Postlude — "Marche Pontiticale" - - Tombelle 

Mr. Chas. D. Irwin, organist. 

The Minister gave the people some "Thoughts on Summer 
Days." Text, "The trees of the Lord are full of sap." 
(Ps. civ: 16.) 

June 29 — The IMinister's sermon was on "Crowns and Coron- 
ations." Text, "Henceforth there is laid up for me a 
crown of righteousness," (II Timothy iv: 8). Dr. Chi- 
chester referred to the historical crowns of Europe, 
among them the Iron Crown of Lombardy, richly jew- 
eled and enameled, preserved at Monza, Italy. A legend 
says the inner band of iron was hammered out of a nail 
of the true cross. Another historical crown is that of 
Charlemagne, preserved at Vienna, composed of a series 
of plaques of gold, richly ornamented with emeralds and 
sapphires. At JMadrid, is preserved the crown of Svin- 
tilla. King of the Visigoths, (621-631), consisting of a 
circlet of thick gold set with precious stones. The crown 
worn by Queen Victoria at her coronation, June 28, 
1838, was that of Edward II, the most graceful and ele- 
gant of all the forms which the English medieval crown 
had assumed, altered, however, for this occasion, with 
arches made of oak leaves in gold. Dr. Chichester spoke 
of the approaching coronation of Edward VII of Eng- 
land. 

July 6 — Last service in the Church before vacation. Miss 
Grace E. Dudley (S.) assisted. 
Offertory — "I Waited for the Lord" - - Mendelssohn 

Dr. Chichester spoke of "Religious Memorials" and referred 
to the proposed renovation of the interior and exterior 
of the Church. 

At 4:00 P. M., funeral services of Mr. H. M. Sherwood, from 
his late residence, 4529 Greenwood avenue, conducted 
by Dr. Chichester with the assistance of the Choir. Mr. 
Sherwood came to Chicago in 1858; was admitted to 
membership in the First Church, July 1, 1864; member 



126 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

of the Board of Trustees and Treasurer of the Church 
(1874-1888). 

September 28 — First service after vacation days, held in the 
Sunday-school room. Sermon by Dr. Chichester; text, 
"And Jacob was left alone." (Gen. xxxii: 24.) 

October 26 — Service held in the newly decorated audience 
room. The enlarged space of the choir gallery will be 
greatly appreciated at the Christmas and Easter Festi- 
vals. Mr. Frederick Clay Bartlett assisted the Trustees 
in selecting colors and decorations. 

December l — Annual meeting of the Church and Society. 
Report of the Trustees was read by Mr. William H. 
Swift, President, giving data as to the cost of recent im- 
provements on the Church. The exterior work cost 
S5,000; interior, $8,400. Of this amount, $2,500 was 
contributed at Christmas, one year ago; $8,400 was 
raised through the efforts of Dr. Chichester; and $735 
by Mrs. Chichester, toward cost of the carpet. 

December 28 — Christmas Celebration : 

Prelude — "The Pastoral Symphony" - - - Bach 

Anthem — "Angels from the Realms of Glory" Cowen 

Hymn — Anthem — "O Gladsome Light" - Sullivan 

Anthem — "Calm on the List'ning Ear of Night" 

--------- H. W. Parker 

Violoncello Solo — "Meditation" ("Thais") - Massenet 

Mr. Steindel. 
Offertory — "O Sing to God" _ _ _ _ Gounod 

Christmas Sermon— Rev. W. J. Chichester, D. D. 

Violin Solo — "Meditation" - - - - Bach-Gounod 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir (Mr. Karl W. Knorr (T.), Mr. HalF having 
resigned), was assisted by the Lyric Choral Club (16 
voices), Mr. Alexander Krauss (violin), Mr. Bruno Stein- 
del (violoncello), Mr. Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Leopold 
de Mare (French horn) and Mrs. Emma W. Bichl (harp). 
Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

1903 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble (S.), Mrs. Christine N. Dreier 
(A.), Mr. Karl W. Knorr (T.), Mr. Alfred Williams (B.), 
Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

1 Mr. Glenn Hall, on leaving Chicago, sang in the Brick Presbyterian Church, New 
York City, for several years; later studied in Germany and Italy, returning to America 
for two seasons with the Metropolitan Opera Co. Mr. Hall now (1912) resides in 
Florence, Italy. 




ALFRED D SHAW. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 127 

January 25 — 

Prelude — "Elevation in A Flat" _ - _ Guilmant 

Offertory — "My Hope is in the Everlasting" - Stainer 

(From "The Daughter of Jairus.") 

Mr. Knorr. 

February 8— Mr. Alfred D. Shaw (T.), succeeding Mr. Karl 
W. Knorr. 

Offertory — "If With All Your Hearts" - Mendelssohn 
Mr. Shaw. 

February 15— Mr. W. A. Willett (B.), in the absence of Mr. 
Alfred WilHams. 

Offertory — "Palm Branches" ----- Faure 
Mr. Willett. 

The Rev. Clifford W. Barnes, preacher. Dr. Chichester ill. 
Text, "These things have I spoken unto you that my 
joy might remain in you." (St. John xv: 11.) 

March 22— Dr. Noble of Los Angeles, Cal., preacher. He 
announced the serious illness of Dr. Chichester, at At- 
lanta, Ga. 

March 24 — Tuesday. Telephone message to me from Mr. 
Caryl Young, that Dr. Chichester had passed away at 
Atlanta, Ga., Monday evening. 

It does not seem possible! A meeting of the Session 
was called at the Sherman House in the afternoon. Messrs. 
Dudley, Baker and myself were appointed a committee to 
make arrangements for the funeral. 

March 26 — Thursday. Funeral services of our beloved Min- 
ister were held in the Church at 3:00 P. M. The Rev. 
James G. K. McClure, D. D., officiated, assisted by the 
Choir. Address by the Rev. Frank W. Gunsaulus, D. D. 
Mr. Moore played the "Funeral March" of Chopin at the 
opening of the service, and the "Chant Seraphique" of 
Guilmant at the close. Mr. Glenn Hall sang the aria by 
Gluck, "O Saviour, Hear Me." 

March 29 — Memorial service for the Rev WilHam John Chi- 
chester, D. D., the seventh Minister, conducted by the 
Rev. Thomas Marshall, D. D. 

Prelude — "Funeral March" _ _ - - Chopin 

Anthem— Chorale, "To Thee, O Lord, I Yield ] 
my Spirit" - - - - j 
Recitative, "And the Witnesses had [ Mendelssohn 

Laid Down their Clothes" 
Chorus, "Happy and Blest" (From 
"St. Paul") - _ - - 
Anthem — "I Waited for the Lord" - - Mendelssohn 



128 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Addresses— Rev. Willis G. Craig, D. D., Rev. Herrick John- 
son, D. D., and Rev. James G. K. McClure, D. D. 
Postlude— "Dead March" ("Saul") - - - Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Grace E. Dudley^ (S.), 
and Mr. Glenn Hall (T.). 

April 12 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude — "Meditation" _ _ _ _ Rousseau 

Violoncello solo — Mr. Herner. 
Anthem — "Worthy is the Lamb" _ _ _ Barnett 
Anthem — "O Saving Victim" _ _ _ _ Gounod 

Anthem — "Behold, Ye Despisers" - - H. W. Parker 
Anthem — "When the Sabbath was Past" - - Foster 

Offertory — "Hosanna" ------ Granier 

Mr. Willett. 
Easter Sermon — Rev. Reuben Haines Hartley, D. D., La 

Porte, Indiana. 
Violin Solo — "Largo" ------ Handel 

Mr. Schulze. 
Organ Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" (From "The 

Messiah") ------- Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir (Mr. W. A. Willett (B.), was assisted by 
Miss Suzanne IMcClure, Miss Mignon Demerest, Miss Alice 
Geiseking, Miss Adah Conner and Miss Rena Gutten- 
berg, sopranos; Miss Myrtle Lawton, Miss Margaret 
Brown, Miss Theckla Leafbourg, Miss Bertha C. De La 
Mothe and Miss Lucy Kent, altos; Mr. John BuUen, Mr. 
George F. O'Connell, Mr. W. M. Gamble, Mr. W. H. 
Graham, Mr. H. G. Martin, tenors; Mr. E. R. Johnson, 
Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, Mr. F. L. Gaudreaux, Mr. H. B. 
Harvey and Mr. C. N. Stevens, basses. Mr. Walter 
Schulze (violin), Mr. Julius Herner (violoncello), Mr. 
Hermann Wiesenbach (flute), Mr. Joseph Fischer (French 
horn), Mrs. Emma W. Bichl (harp). Mr. Philo Adams 
Otis, choirmaster. 

Miss Edna K. Wooley wrote of this service in the Chicago 
Evening Journal, of Monday, April 13: 

"I decided to attend service at the First Presbyterian 
Church on Easter Day, and to sit once more in the warm, 
dim light of this famous old house of worship. 

The present edifice, at Twenty-first street and Indiana 
avenue, has been standing since the great fire. Before that, 
the Church was situated down town — on Wabash avenue, 
near Congress street, opposite the Auditorium. It has always 
been a Church of the substantial and best class of people, and 

' Afterward. Mrs. W. T. Fenton; now (1913) resides in Grand Rapids, Mich. 




ALFRED WILLIAMS. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 129 

today, it is a pleasure to sit among them, for they are mostly 
Chicago-born, and thoroughly American. 

This is a beautiful old Church — for memory's sake, for 
the harmonious richness of its interior architecture, and for 
the glory of its wonderful windows. 

Now, about the preacher today — Dr. Hartley. 

He is a Nathaniel Hawthorne sort of man. Of poetry, 
he is the breathing essence. To hurts and happiness, he is 
highly sensitive. Of sorrow he must know much, for he 
understands so well the pangs of others' sorrows. 

What drew me to this Indiana preacher, was the tenor 
of his first prayer. In it, he showed so great a tenderness, so 
large a knowledge, so wide a sympathy, that unwilling, the 
tears came into my eyes, and I know that other eyes than 
mine were wet as well. 

'Dear God,' said he, let me understand a little more 
of the Easter joy. We all know the agonies, the pains, the 
despairs, the disappointments of the Seventh Day, but not 
enough of us know the Easter joy. ' 

'Victory in the finals,' was the subject of Dr. Hartley's 
sermon. 

Each year, after the birds are gone, after the last leaf 
has fallen, and the heart of every brook is frozen; after the 
long white silence of the snows, the heavens make a new 
covenant with the earth. 



Let us all feel the Christ's victory in ourselves today and 
for all our time to come — as a tribute to this Eastertide. We 
must all suffer — many most unjustly- — but let us be entered 
in the lists for the finals. One can do nothing greater than 
strive for victory of a Christ." 

April 26 — Mr. Albert E. DeRiemer (B.), succeeds Mr. Alfred 
Williams,^ resigned. 

Offertory — "Judge Me O God" ----- Buck 
Mr. DeRiemer. 

Professor M. Bross Thomas, preacher. Text, "For we have 
not followed cunningly devised fables * * * but were 
eye witnesses." (II Peter i: 16.) Some people say the 
whole Bible is a legend! That the w^onderful stories told 
in the Scriptures are myths! fables! 



1 Mr. Williams is now (1913) Musical Director of the Redpath Lyceum Bureau, 
Chicago. 



130 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

May 17 — The Rev. F. M. Carson, D. D., preacher. Subject, 
"Conscience and Remorse." Text, "And herein do I ex- 
ercise myself, to have a conscience always void of of- 
fense." (Acts xxiv: 16.) 

May 31— 

Anthem — "Rise, Crowned with Light" _ _ _ Qtis 

The Rev. Benjamin S. Terry, of the University of Chicago, 
preacher. Text, "In the beginning was the Word." (St. 
John i: 1.) In this and the following verses, the Apostle 
sets forth the personal work of Christ. Here St. John 
makes his editorial bow. 

June 14 — Children's Day. The Rev. Alexander Patterson 
talked to the little folks, on the subject, "In the Garden." 
Three elements are needed to make a garden: "ground," 
"seed" and "care." So in the education of a child, three 
facts must be considered : heredity, environment and de- 
velopment. 

The Church was closed during the month of August, and 
for the first two Sundays in September; opened on Septem- 
ber 20, with the Rev. Samuel A. Fiske, of Avon, Ct., 
preacher; and on September 27, October 4 and October 
11, Prof. Nathaniel Butler, preacher. Mr. Charles D. Irwin 
was organist during the absence of Mr. Moore. 

Some of our vacation days were spent in England. 

October 11 — Sunday, in London; a heavy rain all day. We 
attended morning service at Westminster Abbey, where 
we heard Garrett's Service in F, and for the anthem, the 
quartette from "Elijah," "O Come, Every One that 
Thirsteth." The boys' voices were particularly good. 
Sir Frederick Bridge, organist. 

October 18 — London; morning service at the Inner Temple. 
In the Chapel of this ancient building, the Crusaders 
were wont to assemble for Divine service, before going 
forth to the Holy Land. Choir of boys and men. 
Anthem — "I Waited for the Lord" - - Mendelssohn. 
The Church was filled with law students and barristers. 

Dr. E. J. Hopkins, author of the hymn, "Saviour, Again to 

Thy Dear Name," has been organist of the Temple since 

1843. 

November 15 — Home again. 

Anthem — "Thou Visitest the Earth" - - Barnby 




FREDERICK RAV.MoXD OTIS. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 131 

Prof. Terry, preacher. Subject: "The Conversion of Cor- 
nelius." Text, "There was a certain man in Caesarea 
called Cornelius," (Acts x: 1). 

December 17— Death of Mr. Frederick Raymond Otis an- 
nounced. Mr. Otis was born in Berlin, Erie County, 
Ohio, February 10, 1S25. His early years were divided 
between the hard work of the farm and attendance at 
the district school. Soon after becoming of age, with 
his brother James, he founded the bank of Andrews & 
Otis, in the adjacent town of Milan. In 1849, Frederick 
visited the new city on the lake, called "Chicago," mak- 
ing the trip by horse and buggy, and arriving in Sep- 
tember of that year. Here he visited his uncle, Asahel 
Otis, who lived on a dairy farm on the West Side of the 
city, near Harrison street bridge. From this time on, 
Mr. Otis made frequent visits to Chicago, constantly in- 
vesting in real estate, as he had great faith in the future 
of the city. His investments, like those of his three 
brothers, were in central business property. 

Funeral services, on Saturday, December 19, from 
his late residence, 2033 Prairie avenue. 

Mr. Otis was married, December 25, 1848, to Eme- 
line Tillinghast, daughter of Oliver Cromwell Tillinghast, 
of Berhn, Ohio. The widow and six children survive 
him; Mrs. H. H. Deming, Mrs. Lucius A. Hine, Mrs. 
William G. Sage, Miss Margaretta E. Otis, Mr. Charles 
Tillinghast Otis, Treasurer (1912) of the Board of Trus- 
tees of this Church, and Mr. Lucius James Otis, Treas- 
urer (1913) of the Diamond Jubilee Commemorative Fund. 

December 27— Christmas Celebration : 

Prelude — "The Pastoral Symphony" - - - Bach 

Anthem — "Sing, O Daughter of Zion" - - Gadsby 
Anthem — "Rejoice in the Lord" - - - Hollins 

Anthem — "O Sing to God" ----- Gounod 

Violoncello Solo— "Meditation" - - - Rousseau 

Mr. Steindel. 
Offertory — "Calm on the List'ning Ear of Night" 

- - -^ - - - - - - H. \V. Parker 

bermon — Prof. Benjamin S. Terry of the University of 

Chicago. 
Violin Solo — "Meditation" - - - _ Bach-Gounod 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude— "And the Glory of the Lord" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir (Mrs. Sarah S. Maxon (A.), in the absence 
of Mrs. Dreier), was assisted by the Lyric Choral Club 
(18 voices), Mr. Alexander Krauss (violin), Mr. Bruno 



132 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Steindel (violoncello), Mr. Alfred Ouensel (flute), Mr. 
Leopold de Mare (French horn) and jNIrs. Emma W. Bichl 
(harp). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

1904 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble (S.), Mrs. Christine N. Dreier 
(A.), Mr. Alfred D. Shaw (T.), Mr. Albert E. DeRiemer 
(B.), and Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

January 2 — Saturday, Mr. John Kirk Stearns passed away 
today at the age of sixty-three. He was born in Tolland, 
Conn.; came to Chicago in 1860. Mr. Stearns was agent 
of the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co., and had 
been with the company forty-three years. He was 
received into membership of the First Church, Decem- 
ber 31, 1866. From 1869-1870, he was Superintendent 
of Railroad Mission. 

January 27 — Wednesday evening. At a meeting of the 
First Presbyterian Church and Society, a formal call was 
extended to the Rev. John Archibald Morison, Ph. D., 
of St. John, N. B., Canada, to become the Minister of 
this Church. Messrs. Samuel Baker, Ernest A. Hamill 
and Philo A. Otis were appointed a committee to pros- 
ecute the call. 

February 28— Mr. Glenn Hall (T.) assisted. 

Offertory — "I Will Mention" _ _ _ _ Sullivan 

Postlude — "March in C" _____ Bossi 

Mr. Moore. 

March 6 — Letter of acceptance from the Rev. John A. 
Morison, Ph. D., read from the pulpit by Prof. Terry. 

Anthem — "God, that Madest Earth and Heaven" 

--------- Chadwick 

Postlude — "Fugue in C Minor" - - - H. W. Parker. 
Mr. Moore. 

March 20 — Mr. Marion Green (B.), in the absence of Mr. 
DeRiemer. 

Offertory— "The Lord is my Light" - - - - Buck 
Mrs. Dreier and Mr. Green. 

Prof. Terry spoke on "College Education." 

"If you cannot trust your boy at home," said the preach- 
er; "if he cannot look you straight in the eye; if he is de- 
ceitful, don't send him to us, thinking that we can make 
him right. Keep him at home." Of the men now in 
Congress, forty-four per cent are college graduates. 

March 23 — Wednesday P. M. Funeral services of Mr. Charles 
Counselman, who died at Virginia Hot Springs, Sunday, 



)H\ ARCHIBALD M(miSt)\ 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 133 

March 20, were held at his late residence, 5035 Green- 
wood avenue, conducted by the Rev. W. Francis Irwin, 
former Minister of the Fifth Presbyterian Church, Chi- 
cago. The grain, stock and bond house of Counselman 
& Co. in Chicago was established in 1871. Mr. Counsel- 
man was born in Baltimore, Md., December 25, 1849; 
came to Chicago in 18(37. He married, in 1875, Jennie E., 
daughter of the late Lucius B. Otis. Mr. Counselman 
was instrumental in the removal (1882) of the Board of 
Trade to its present location. The Counselman cottage, 
at the Chicago Orphan Asylum, was one of his many 
benefactions. He was received into the membership of 
the First Church in 18G8. 

April 3 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude — "Melodie Religieuse" - - — - Dubois 

Flute Solo, Mr. Quensel. 
Anthem — "Worthy is the Lamb" _ _ _ Barnett 
Anthem — "Now is Christ Risen" - - John E. West 

Anthem — "When the Sabbath was Past" - - Foster 

Violoncello Solo — "Meditation" ("Thais") - Massenet 

Mr. Steindel. 
Offertory — "In Heavenly Love Abiding" - H. W. Parker 
Sermon — By the Minister elect, Rev. John Archibald Mori- 
son, Ph. D. 
Violin Solo — "Largo" ------ Handel 

Mr. Krauss. 
Postlude — "The Hallelujah Chorus" - - - Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted (Mr. Thomas ]\I. I\Iendsen (T.) 
in the absence of Mr. Shaw) by the Lyric Choral Club 
(19 voices), Mr. Alexander Krauss (violin), Mr. Bruno 
Steindel (violoncello), Mr. Alfred Quensel, (flute), Mr. 
Leopold de Mare (French horn), Mr. Joseph Beckel 
(double bass), Mrs. Emma W. Bichl (harp). Mr. Philo 
Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

Beautiful day; a large audience in attendance. The 
new Minister was introduced by Elder Henry W. Dudley. 

April 17 — Dr. Morison chose for his subject, "The wonderful 
ladder which Jacob saw in his dreams." Text, "And he 
dreamed, and behold a ladder," etc. (Gen. xxviii: 12.) 

April 24 — The subject of the ]\Iinister's sermon was Paul's 
message to the Galatians. Text: "And let us not be 
weary in well doing." (Gal. vi: 9.) 
Offertory — "Like as the Hart Desireth" - - Allitsen. 
Mrs. Christine N. Dreier.* 

' Mrs. Christine N. Dreier (formerly Miss Christine Nielson) came to Chicago in 
1SS5; entered the Choir of the First Church. Januar^M. 1SS6; studied with Mrs. Sara 



134 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Mrs. Dreir leaves the Choir today after a faithful service 
of eighteen years; succeeded by Miss Helen Hall;^ followed 
later by Mrs. Sarah S. Maxon. 

April 2S — Thursday evening; installation service of the Rev. 
John Archibald Morison, Ph. D., as eighth Minister. 
The Moderator of the Presbytery, the Rev. Augustus 
Stiles Carrier, D. D., presided, assisted by the Rev. 
William Robson Notman, D. D., Minister of the Fourth 
Presbyterian Church, the Rev. William John McCaughan, 
Minister of the Third Presbyterian Church, and the Rev. 
Cleland Boyd McAfee, D. D., Minister of the Forty-first 
Street Presbyterian Church. 
Prelude — "Andante in D" - - - - - Hollins 

Anthem — "Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord" - Garrett 
Evening Hymn — "God, That Madest Earth and Heaven" 
---------- Chadwick 

Anthem — "I Waited for the Lord" - - Mendelssohn 

Anthem — "Hearken Unto Me My People" - Sullivan 

Postlude — "Marche Pontificale" _ _ - Tombelle 

Mr. Moore. 

The Choir was assisted by the Choir of the Forty-first Street 
Presbyterian Church; Miss Mary P. Thomson (S.), Miss 
Louise Blish (A.), Mr. George A. Brewster (T.), and Mr. 
Charles T. Atkinson (B.), pro-tern. 

May 15— 

Offertory — "Judge me, O God" ----- Buck 
Mr. Worthington. 

Mr. Julian M. Worthington (B.) succeeds Mr. Albert H. 
DeRiemer, resigned. 

The Minister's sermon was in reference to the work at Rail- 
road Mission. Text, "But ye shall receive power." 
(Actsi: 8.) 

June 29 — Some of our vacation days were spent in Italy. 
This (Wednesday) being a fete day, we heard a Mass by 
]Mancinelli at the Church of Annunziata in Florence , sung 
by thirty boys and fifteen men, with the unusual ac- 
companiment of four double basses, four 'cellos and two 
organs. The large organ, in the nave of the Church, was 
used only in the fortissimo passages of the Mass. The 
other organ, a small one, was in the choir, back of the 
chancel, with the singers and instruments. After the 

Hershey Eddy until June, 1889. when she went to London and studied with George 
Henschel. rt-tuming to the First Church, May 17, 1891. She is now (1913) a mem- 
ber of the Choir of St. Paul's Universalist Church. 
1 After^vard. Mrs. Frederick W. Upham. 




MRS CHRISTINE XIELSOX DREIER. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 135 

service I met the conductor and he explained to me the 
choir arrangements and the band parts. The use of 
double basses and 'cellos in Church music is confined to 
the Churches of Italy and France. At the Church of St. 
Sulpice in Paris, these instruments are employed with 
two organs at every Sunday service. 

During the month of August, and until the second Sunday 
in September, the morning services in the First Church 
were omitted. 

September 4 — Home again; attended the Second Presby- 
terian Church in the evening. Preacher, the Rev. Mr. 
Odell of Birmingham, England. Text, "Ye are the tem- 
ple of the living God." (II Cor. vi: 16) The speaker 
referred to the temples at Ephesus and Athens; also the 
Cathedrals in England. Paul was partly blind, had to 
be led about, consequently he never speaks of flowers or 
fruit in his Epistles. 

September 11 — 

Anthem — "O come, every one that Thirsteth" 

--------- Mendelssohn 

(From "EHjah.") 

OflEertory — "If with all your Hearts" - Mendelssohn 

(From "Elijah.") 

Mr. Shaw. 

The bulletin records the death of Mr. George H. Lafiin 
at Pittsfield, Mass., July 24. Mr. and Mrs. George H. 
Lafiin were admitted as members of the First Church, Dec. 
26, 1864. 

October 2 — The Rev. John Balcom Shaw, D. D., begins his 
work as Minister of the Second Presbyterian Church. 
The installation services took place Thursday evening, 
October 27. The Rev. Prof. Augustus S. Carrier, 
D. D., Moderator of the Presbytery, presided, assisted 
by the Rev. John Archibald Morison, Ph. D., the Rev. 
J. G. K. McClure, D. D., the Rev. John E. Bushnell, 
D. D., of the Westminster Church, Minneapolis, and the 
Rev, Prof. George L. Robinson, Ph. D. 

October 16— Mrs. W. S. Bracken (A.), succeeds Mrs. Sarah 
S. Maxon. 

November 23 — Wednesday evening. Memorial service for 
former Ministers: 

Founder— The Rev. Jeremiah Porter, D. D. (1833-1835). Died 
July 25, 1893. Remarks by Mr. Henry W. Dudley. 



136 PULPIT AXD CHOIR. 

First Minister— The Rev. John Blatchford, D. D. (1837-1839). 
Died April 8, 1855. Remarks by Mr. Philo A. Otis. 

Second Minister— The Rev. Flavel Bascom, D. D. (1840-1849) . 
Died August 8, 1890. Remarks by the Rev. John Archi- 
bald Morison, Ph. D. 

Third Minister— The Rev. Harvey Curtis, D. D. (1850-1858). 
Died September 18, 1862. Remarks by Mr. E. S. Wells. 

Fourth ^Minister — The Rev. Zephaniah Moore Humphrey, 
D. D. (1859-1868). Died November 13, 1881. Remarks 
by Prof. Albert McCalla. 

Fifth Minister— The Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D. (1868-1880). 
Died April 24, 1893. Remarks by Mr. Addison Ballard. 

Sixth Minister— The Rev. John Henry Barrows, D. D. (1881- 
1896). Died June 3, 1902. Remarks by Mr. Charles 
Ailing, Jr. 

Seventh Minister — The Rev. William John Chichester, D. D. 
(1897-1903). Died March 23, 1903. Remarks by Mr. 
H. H Munger. 

The proceedings of this service afterward appeared in 
pamphlet form, by order of the Session. 

December 11 — 

Anthem — "Sing Praises Unto the Lord" - - Gounod 

All the Choir numbers this morning were from the works of 
Charles Gounod. Dr. Morison spoke from the words in 
the anthem, "For His wrath endureth but the twinkling 
of an eye, and in His pleasure is life," etc. (Ps. xxx: 5.) 

December 25 — Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude — "Andante Religioso" - - - - Thom6 

With solos for French horn and flute. 
Anthem — "Angels from the Realms of Glory" Cowen 

Anthem — "It Came upon the Midnight Clear" 

--------- H. \V. Parker 

Anthem — "Hark, Hark, My Soul" - - Chadvvick 

Violoncello Solo — "Andante Religioso" - - Dubois 

Mr. Steindel. 
Offertory — "Calm on the List'ning Ear of Night" 

--------- H. W. Parker 

Christmas Sermon — Rev. John Archibald Morison, Ph. D. 
Violin Solo — "Meditation" - - - - Bach-Gounod 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "For Unto Us a Child is Born" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by the Lyric Choral Club (20 
voices) ; Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Frederick Stock 




rRAXCIS SII.VEV MODKE 



PULPIT AXD CHOIR. 137 

(violins), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), ]\Ir. Alfred 
Quensel (flute), Mr. Leopold de Mare (French horn), 
Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph Beckel and 
Mr. Louis Klemm (double basses). Mr. Philo Adams 
Otis, choirmaster. 

1905 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble (S.), Mrs. Willard S. 
Bracken (A.). Mr. Alfred D. Shaw (T.), Mr. J. M. 
Worthington (B.) and Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 
January S — Memorial service for Mr. Theodore Thomas, 
conductor of the Chicago Orchestra, who died January 
4. All the Choir numbers from Handel's "Messiah." 
Recitative and Aria — "Comfort Ye, My People" and "Every 
Valley." 

Mr. Shaw. 

January 13 — Friday; funeral service of Mr. Charles Davis- 
son Hamill, who died January 11, were held in the 
Church at 12:30 P. Isl., conducted by Dr. Morison, as- 
sisted by the brass choir of the Chicago Orchestra, under 
the direction of Mr. Stock. 
Organ Prelude — "Dead March" ("Saul") - - Handel 

Two Chorales- ( ."^ ^^'^^^y I'^'ll^t' T ~' n .\"'^" 
[ trom the iMnth bymphony Beethoven 

Brass Choir. 

Organ Postlude — -"Funeral March" - - Beethoven 

Mr. Moore. 

Appropriate hymns were sung by the Choir of the Church. 
Five sons and a nephew of the deceased acted as pall- 
bearers — an impressive sight. Thirty years and more of my 
life have been associated with two men in the development 
of music in Chicago, Theodore Thomas and Charles D. Ham- 
ill, men who stood for the highest in musical art. Mr. Hamill 
was one of the founders of the Mendelssohn Society (1S5S- 
1865), of which Mr. A. W. Dohn was the conductor. My 
recollections of Mr. Hamill date from a series of concerts 
given by Mr. Thomas in Chicago in November, 1870, in Far- 
well Hall. The concert on the 14th of November, included 
the Choral Fantasie of Beethoven for piano solo (Miss Meh- 
lig), chorus and orchestra; Mr. Hamill and I were members 
of the chorus. In 1877, Mr. Hamill became a member of 
the Apollo Musical Club, founded in 1872, and in the season 
of 1886-87, was its President. He was chairman of the 
Music Committee in the May Festivals of 1882 and 1884, of 



138 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

which Mr. Thomas was conductor. To the Chicago Art In- 
stitute, he also gave much of his time and thought, being 
one of its founders and a member of its Board of Trustees, 
until his death. He was a Charter Member of the Orchestral 
Association, organized in 1891; was instrumental in bringing 
Mr. Thomas to Chicago, as conductor of the Orchestra, and 
was a member of its Board of Trustees at the time of his death. 
During his last illness, Mr. Hamill's mind constantly dwelt upon 
the completion of Orchestra Hall, to the building of which he 
had devoted much effort in the closing year of his life. Mr. 
Hamill was born, November 14, 1839, in Bloomington, In- 
diana. Mr. and Mrs. Hamill were received into the member- 
ship of the First Church, April 4, 1862. 

January 22 — The entire musical service consisted of selec- 
tions from the works of Mendelssohn. Miss Emma 
Rommeiss (A.) assisted. 
Response — "Lift Thine Eyes" (From "Elijah.") 

Mrs. Trimble, Mrs. Bracken and Miss Rommeiss. 
Offertory — "The Sorrows of Death" 

(From "The Hymn of Praise.") 
Mr. Shaw. 
Postlude — "War March of the Priests" 
Mr. Moore. 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text, "And the Word was made 
flesh," etc., (St. John i: 14). 

February 7 — Tuesday, 10:30 A. M. A number of ladies met 
in the Church and organized the Fort Dearborn Guild, at 
the suggestion of Dr. Morison, an organization open to 
all women who loved the traditions of the Church and 
who were interested in its prosperity. The Guild held 
public meetings at various times during the winter, with 
exercises, consisting of music, papers on popular sub- 
jects, recitations, etc. 

February 12 — The Choir was assisted by Miss Grace Ken- 
nicott (S.), Miss Emma Rommeiss (A.), Mr. G. M. Hobbs 
(T.) and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson (B.). 

Anthem — "Hearken Unto Me, My People" - SuUivan 
Anthem — "God, That Madest Earth and Heaven" Chadwick 

February 19 — Memorial service for Mrs. Daniel A. Jones, 
whose death occurred in Pasadena, Cal., February 10. 

Prelude — "Funeral March" - - - - Beethoven 

Chorale — Recitative and Chorus, 

"To Thee, O Lord I Yield My Spirit" 

"Happy and Blest are They" - - Mendelssohn 



MRS DAXIEL A JoXES. 



PULPIT A\'D CHOIR. 139 

Aria — "I Know that My Redeemer Liveth" - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mrs. Trimble. 

Offertory — "The Sorrows of Death" - - Mendelssohn 

(From "The Hymn of Praise.") 

Mr. Shaw. 

Response — "Crossing the Bar" - - - - Parry 

Postlude — "Funeral March" _ _ _ _ Chopin 

Mr. Moore. 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text, "This woman was full of 
good works and alms deeds which she did." (Acts ix: 
36.) "Such is the brief record of the life of one who was 
much beloved in life and deeply lamented in death. She 
made the widow and orphan her special care. The root 
of her benevolence was her Christian discipleship. * * * 
She was generous toward the poor, for she knew 'the 
grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though He was rich, 
yet for our sakes. He became poor, that we, through His 
poverty might become rich.' " Mr. and Mrs. Daniel A. 
Jones were admitted to the membership of Calvary 
Presbyterian Church, January 1, 1S60. Mr. Jones died 
January 11, 1886. 

Mrs. Jones, in her will, gave twenty thousand dollars to the 
Trustees of the First Presbyterian Church, to be held by 
them and their successors in said ofhce, in accordance 
with the following proviso: "If changes take place in 
said Church which result in a sale or other disposition of 
its present edifice, the Trustees may use said fund as 
they deem for the best interests of said Church, pro- 
\dded, however, that they shall always give one hun- 
dred dollars a year to the Sessional Fund, and shall 
always maintain a Daniel A. Jones family pew. If a 
fund shall be raised to commemorate the Seventy-Fifth 
Anniversary of the founding of said Church, ten thou- 
sand dollars of this legacy of twenty thousand dollars 
shall be considered as my contribution to said fund." 

March 5 — Choir assisted bv Miss Grace Anderson (S.), Mrs. 
Sarah S. Maxon (A.),' Mr. G. M. Hobbs (T.) and Mr. 
Charles T. Atkinson (B.), to continue until Easter Day. 

March 19 — 

Anthem — "For He Shall Give His Angels" Mendelssohn 
(From "Elijah.") 

Dr. Morison spoke on the text, "If ye then be risen with 
Christ." (Col. iii: 1.) 

April 23— Easter Celebration : 

Prelude — "Benedictus" - - _ _ Mackenzie 

Anthem — "Lord, Thou Alone art God" - Mendelssohn 



140 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Anthem — "I Shall not Die, but Live" - H. W. Parker 
Anthem — "When the Sabbath was Past" - - Foster 

Violoncello Solo — "Andante Religioso" - - Dubois 

Mr. Steindel. 
Offertory — "I Know that My Redeemer Liveth" Handel 

Mrs. Trimble. 
Sermon — Rev. John Archibald Morison, Ph. D. 
Violin Solo — "Largo" ------ Handel 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "The Hallelujah Chorus" - Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir of eight voices was assisted by the Lyric 
Choral Club (15 voices), Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. 
Frederick Stock (violins), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violon- 
cello), Mr. Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Leopold de Mare 
(French horn), Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph 
Beckel and Mr. Louis Klemm (double basses). Mr. 
Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

May 14 — 

The Minister spoke on the text, "By faith, Abraham, when 
he was called to go." (Heb. xi: 8.) 

May 15 — Monday, 10:45 A. M. The 400th Anniversary of 
the birth of John Knox, was celebrated in this Church. 
The sermon delivered by the Rev. William J. McCaughan 
of the Third Presbyterian Church. The service was 
quite unusual ; a feature being the singing without the aid 
of Choir and organ, but led by the Precentor, the Rev. 
Alexander C. Manson, Ph. D., as in the days of the great 
Scottish Reformer. The Edinburgh edition (1565) of 
the Psalms was used. The third verse of Psalm cxxiii 
reads : 
"The raging streams, moste proude in roaring noyce: 
Had long ago overwhelmde us in the depe; 
But loved be God, which doth us safely kepe; 
From bloodie teeth and their most cruel voyce, 
Quhilk as a preye, to eat us, wolde rejoyce." 

"John Knox," said Mr. McCaughan, "was the first man 
in Great Britain to propose a system of general education, 
and had it not been for the greed of the Scottish nobility, his 
system would have been started forthwith. He proposed 
that the great ecclesiastical wealth which the Church had ac- 
cumulated should be divided into three equal parts; one to 
maintain the ministry, another to take care of the poor, and 
the third to educate the people. * * * The plans of Knox 
undoubtedly gave shape to the plans of Witherspoon, when 




ADDISON BALLARD. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 141 

the form of government in these United States was organized . 
He knew no fear, save the fear of God. He fought every 
evil, injustice and tyranny and denounced the iniquity of 
men to their faces." 

May 21— Mr. G. M. Hobbs (T.) and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson 
(B.), assisting. 

Offertory — "For my Soul Thirsteth for God" ("42nd 
Psalm") ------- Mendelssohn 

Mrs. Trimble. 

Anthem — "The Lord Hath Commanded" Mendelssohn 

For soprano solo and men's voices. 

Sermon by Prof. Benjamin S. Terry of the University of Chi- 
cago. Text, "And I saw as it were a sea of glass." 
(Rev. XV : 2.) 

June 4 — 

Offertory— "O God, Have Mercy" - - - Calkin 

Mr. Shaw and quartette. 

Postlude — "Allegro from Fifth Sonata" - - Merkel 

Mr. Moore. 

The sermon by Dr. Morison this morning on the subject, 
"My Own Religion," was afterward published by one of 
the members of the Church for private circulation. 

June 28 — Wednesday. Death announced of Mr. Addison 
Ballard, an Elder in this Church. Mr. Ballard was born 
November 30, 1823, in Salem, Lebanon County, Ohio. 
He visited Chicago in 1843; came here to reside in 1853. 
In the autumn of 1872, the building committee placed 
Mr. Ballard in charge of the construction of the present 
edifice of the First Church, and through his efforts the 
Church was completed and ready for the Dedication 
Concert, February 6, 1873. He was an active worker in 
Railroad Mission. For many years, Mr. Ballard was 
alderman from the second ward. 

July 23 — Mr. Marion Green (B.) in the absence of Mr. Worth- 
ington. Preacher, the Rev. James Russell of Wolseley, 
Canada. Text, "Wherefore, seeing we also are com- 
passed about with so great a crowd of witnesses," etc. 
(Heb. xii: 1-2.) Paul's letters abound in homely illus- 
trations. These verses refer to the Olympian Games: (1) 
the race; (2) the witnesses; (3) the weights; (4) the end 
of the race, v-ictory. 

July 30— 

Prelude — "Prelude in G Minor" - _ _ Pierne 

Anthem — "Saviour, Source of Every Blessing" - Otis 



142 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

The Rev. James Russell occupied the pulpit again today. 
Text, "I am the vine." (St. John xv: 5.) Here again 
we have homely illustrations by an Apostle. The way 
to a full assurance of salvation is to walk with God, and 
be fruitful in good works. In the Waldensian valleys, 
the vine is the only form of vegetation that will thrive. 
When the fir tree was first introduced into Italy, in order 
that the young tree might be nourished, the peasants 
moistened the roots with wine. 

September 10 — Some of our vacation days were passed at 
Lake Mohonk, New York. Divine service this morning 
in the parlor of the hotel with a sermon by the Rev. 
Theodore L. Cuyler, D. D.^ Text, "Which hope we have 
as an anchor of the soul," etc. (Hebrews vi: 19.) The 
sermon abounded in happy allusions to the sailor life; 
(1) the right course; (2) the correct compass; (3) the 
sure anchor. The venerable preacher referred to his own 
life of more than eighty years — fifty years spent in the 
Christian ministry. "My life voyage is about ended. 
Soon I shall hear eight bells. I see the Pilot coming. I 
see the harbor lights. The saddest thing today is not 
the obituary lists in newspapers, but the shipwrecked 
lives, the living dead, the useless hulks strewn along the 
beach of life." 

October 8 — Home again. A glorious autumn day. 

Motet — "Jesus, Word of God Incarnate" - - Elgar 

Offertory — "Come, Holy Ghost" - - H. \V. Parker 

Mr. Shaw. 

Postlude — "Grand Chorus in A" _ _ _ Salomd 

Mr. Moore. 

October 15 — 

Prelude — "Lamento" ----- Gabriel-Marie 

Violoncello solo, Mr. Paul Schoessling. 

Offertory — "Heavenly Light" - - - - Gounod 

Mrs. Trimble. 

With accompaniment for violoncello and organ. 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text, "And they shall be mine, 
saith the Lord of Hosts, in that day, when I make up 
my jewels." (Malachi iii: 17.) Malachi, the saddest of 
all the Prophets. 

October 29 — 

Offertory— "Father, Most Holy" - - H. W. Parker 

Mrs. Bracken. 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text, "And when Jesus saw that 
he answered discreetly. He said unto him, thou art not 

'Dr. Cuylcr died February 26, 1909, in Brooklyn, N. Y. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 143 

far from the Kingdom of God!" (St. Mark xii: 34.) 
There are twelve gates to the New Jerusalem and each 
may enter by the gate nearest to him. So many come 
near but will not enter. 

November 14 — Tuesday. Meeting of the Fort Dearborn 
Guild in the Church parlors this morning. Subject, 
"The Chicago Fire." Convener, Mrs. William G. Sage. 

December 3 — Choir assisted by Miss Amy Leech (S.), Mrs. 
Sarah S. Maxon (A.), Mr. F. S. Russell (T.) and Mr. 
Charles T. Atkinson (B.), to continue during the month 
of December. 

Anthem — "Ye Shall go out with Joy" - - Barnby 

Anthem — "For He Shall Give His Angels" Mendelssohn 

(From "Elijah.") 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text, "My peace I give unto you." 
(St. John xiv: 27.) The last gift of the Master was the 
"peace I give unto you," a peace the world cannot take 
away. 

The bulletin announced the death, on November 26, of ]\Ir. 
John H. Brown, an Elder in this Church. 

December 4 — At the Annual Meeting, held this Monday 
evening, Mr. William H. Swift announced that he would 
make his home for the future in Pittsfield, Mass., and 
accordingly tendered his resignation as President and 
member of the Board of Trustees. This will be a great 
loss to the Congregation. Mr. Swift was wise in counsel, 
held sound views on Church finance and kept in close 
touch with every activity of the Society. He was suc- 
ceeded on the Board by Mr. S. Leonard Boyce. 

December 10 — All the Choir numbers from Mendelssohn's 
"Forty-second Psalm." 

Postlude — "Prelude and Fugue in D Minor" Mendelssohn. 
Mr. Moore. 

Dr. Morison spoke on the "Modern motive of Foreign Mis- 
sions." Text, "For the love of Christ constraineth us." 
(II Cor. v: 14.) 

December 24— Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude — "The Pastoral Symphony" - - Bach 

Anthem — "And the Glory'of the Lord" - - Handel 

("The Messiah.") 
Anthem — "It Came Upon the Midnight Clear" 

--------- H. \V. Parker 

Anthem — "Brightest and Best" - - - H. W. Parker 

Violoncello Solo — "Adagio Pathetique" - - Godard 

Mr. Steindel. 



144 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Offertory — "Comfort Ye" and "Every Valley" Handel 

Mr. Shaw. 

Christmas Sermon — Rev. John A. Morison, Ph. D. 

VioHn Solo — "Meditation" - - - - Bach-Gounod 

Organ Postlude — "For Unto us a Child is Born" Handel 

("The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir of eight voices was assisted by the Lyric 
Choral Club (16 voices). 

The orchestra : Mr, Alexander Krauss and Mr. Frederick Stock 
(violins), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. Alfred 
Quensel (flute), Mr. Leopold de Mare (French horn), Mr. 
Enrico Tramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph Beckel and Mr. 
Louis Klemm (double basses). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, 
choirmaster. 



1906 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble (S.), Mrs. Willard S. Bracken 
(A.), Mr. Alfred D. Shaw (T.), Mr. Julian M. Worthing- 
ton (B.), Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

January 16 — Tuesday, 10:30 A. M. At the regular monthly 
meeting of the Fort Dearborn Guild, held in the Church 
parlors, a paper was read by Mrs. William E. Kelley. 
Subject, "Illuminated IMissals and Manuscripts." Mrs. 
Kelley's rare collection of old missals, prints and em- 
broideries, was exhibited. Convener, Mrs. Charles T. 
Atkinson. 

Mr. Marshall Field, a member of the Board of Trustees 
of this Church, (1875-1902) died today at the Holland House, 
New York City. 

January 19 — Friday noon. Funeral of Mr. Marshall Field, 
held in the (Church, conducted by the Rev. John 
A. Morison, Ph. D. The Choir of the First Church was 
assisted by the Choir of the Second Presbyterian Church; 
Mrs. Lucille S. Tewksbury (S.), Mrs. Annie R. Thacker 
(A.), Mr. H. A. Mix (T.) and Mr. Arthur Beresford (B.). 

Prelude — "Funeral March" ----- Chopin 

Hymn — "Lead, Kindly Light" - - - - Dykes 

Hymn — "One Sweetly Solemn Thought" - - Otis 

Postlude — "Dead March" (From "Saul") - - Handel 
Mr. Moore. 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text, "Know ye not that there is 
a prince and a great man fallen this day." (II Samuel 
iii: 38.) 







0k. 




t ' 


j^ 






jL 


1 


^ 





MARSHALL FIELD. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 145 

January 21 — Memorial service for Mr. Field held in the 
Church; 

Prelude — "Funeral March" ----- Choi;in 

Anthem— Chorale— "To Thee, O Lord I ] 

Yield My Spirit" I Mendelssohn 

Recit.— "And the Witnesses" ^ Mendelssohn 



Chorus — "Happy and Blest" 

(From "St. Paul") 

Response — "Crossing the Bar" - - - - Parry 

Offertory — "The Sorrows of Death" - - Mendelssohn 

(From "The Hymn of Praise.") 

Mr. Shaw. 

Anthem — "I Waited for the Lord" - - Mendelssohn 

(From "The Hymn of Praise.") 

Mrs. Trimble, Miss Leech and chorus. 

Postlude — "Dead March" ("Saul") - - - Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

Dr. Morison in his sermon, text: "A time to weep" (Eccl. 
iii: 4), said: "Whether as members of this Church, which 
for long years was the spiritual home of Marshall Field, 
or citizens of this mighty city of Chicago, with all today, 
there is one thought that is uppermost in mind and 
heart — Marshall Field is dead. 

"The pulpit of this Church, in which for so many years 
Marshall Field worshipped, and whose interest as a Trus- 
tee he so long promoted, may not be silent at this time 
with regard to his life. Yet, how difficult it is to speak. 
We gather as it were in the darkness, beside the mar- 
gin of that vast mysterious sea over which his spirit has 
gone. With us is the darkness and the sense of loss — 
the sagacious man, the captain of industry, the gener- 
ous philanthropist, the loyal and distinguished friend, 
has gone to return no more." 

Mr. Field was born at Conway, Mass., August IS, 1835; 
came to Chicago in 1856. 

January 28 — 

Anthem — "Blessed be the Lord God of Israel" - Barnby 
Anthem — "Turn Thy Face From My Sins" 

-------- Sidney Thompson 

Offertory— "The Lost Chord" _ - - - Sullivan 

Dr. Morison spoke on "The IndividuaHty of the Soul." 
Text: "For the mountains shall depart" (Isaiah liv: 
10.) The everlasting hills are emblems of eternity. 



146 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

February 4 — Dr. Morison spoke on "The Varied Vicissi- 
tudes of Life." Text, "In the day of prosperity be joy- 
ful, but in the day of adversity consider." (Eccl. vii: 
14.) Prosperity and adversity were favorite themes with 
the old writers. Read the stories of Joseph, David and 
Nebuchadnezzar — "sweet are the uses of adversity." 

February 11 — 

Anthem— "I Will Sing of Thy Power" - - Sullivan 

Offertory — "Prayer" ______ Chadwick 

Dr. Morison's subject was "Prayer." Text: "But thou 
when thou prayest," etc. (St. Matt. vi:6.) If God is 
all powerful why the need for prayers? The great pur- 
pose in prayer is not to get something, not to get our 
wants supplied, but to keep up communication with 
God. 

February 25— Mr. F. S. Russell (T.) and Mr. Charles T. At- 
kinson (B.) assisted. 

Anthem — "Hearken Unto Me, My People" - Sullivan 

Anthem — "The Lord Hath Commanded" Mendelssohn 

Soprano solo with men's voices. 

("Forty-second Psalm.") 

Offertory — "While We Have Time" - - H. W. Parker 

The Minister spoke on Home Missions and furnished some 
startling figures as to the population of Chicago today; 
forty languages spoken; ten foreign newspapers printed; 
27,000 children in one ward, of whom 7,000 were arrested 
in one year for crime; Chicago, the largest Polish city in 
the world next to Warsaw — 250,000 Poles; we have 
750,000 Roman Catholics; 1,000,000 people do not go 
to Church at all. 

March 11— Mr. Forest D. Carr (B.), Mr. J. M. Worthington,^ 
resigned. 

Offertory — "It Is Enough" (From "Ehjah") Mendelssohn 
Mr. Carr. 

Preacher, the Rev. A. W. Halsey, D. D. Subject, "Foreign 
Missions." Five years after the Boxer rising in China, 
there were 50,000 converts to Christianity. In the first 
28 years of mission work in China, there were only two 
converts. In 1860 only 1,000. 



' Mr, Worthington is a member of the Imperial Quartette; since 1910, member 
of the Choir of Christ Reformed Episcopal Church. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 147 

March 13— Tuesday, 10:30 A. M. At the meeting of the 
Fort Dearborn Guild in the Church parlors, the subject 
for discussion was "Music." Paper by Mr. Philo A. 
Otis, "Personal Experiences in Church and Choir Work." 
Mrs. Theodore Thomas read a paper on "The Orchestral 
Association." Piano solos by Miss Edna Peterson. Con- 
vener, Miss Whitehead. 

April 1 — Mr. Marion Green (B.). The regular Choir assist- 
ed by Miss Amy Leech (S.), Miss Emma Rommeiss 
(A.), Mr. Frank T. Johnson (T.) and Mr. Charles T. At- 
kinson (B.). 

The Minister's subject was, "Inspiration in Life and Work." 
Text, "Spring up, O well; sing ye unto it." (Numbers 
xxi: 17.) The daily round of life is often a hard, weary 
task, like drawing water from a well. 

April 15 — Easter Celebration: A cold, raw day, but a great 
audience in attendance. 

Prelude — "Hymne a Sainte Cecile" - - - Gounod 
Anthem — "When the Sabbath was Past" - - Foster 

I Anthem — "Hark, Hark My Soul" - - Chadwick 

Anthem— "I Shall not Die, but Live" - H. W. Parker 
Violoncello Solo — "Romance" _ - - - Sokolow 

Mr. Steindel. 
Offertory— Recit.— "And God Said, 'Let the ] 

Earth' " - - - - ^ Haydn 

Aria — "With Verdure Clad" - - J 
(From "The Creation.") 
Mrs. Trimble. 
Violin Solo — "Largo" ------ Handel 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "And With His Stripes" - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text, "But if there be no resur- 
rection of the dead, then is Christ not risen." (I Cor. 
xv: 13.) 

The regular Choir of eight voices w^as assisted by the Lyric 
Choral Club (16 voices). 

The orchestra: Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Frederick 
Stock (violins), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. 
Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Leopold de Mare (French 
horn), Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph Beckel 
and Mr. Louis Klemm (double basses). Mr. Philo Adams 
Otis, choirmaster. 

The offering for the Presbyterian Hospital — $2,400. 



148 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Our vacation days were passed in Spain and the south 
of France. 

May 21 — Monday, at Cordova, Spain. Fete day. Attended 
Mass at the Cathedral, formerly a mosque, built by the 
Moors in 756. This great mosque, with its 1,200 columns, 
the glory of Cordova, was much impaired in 1523, by 
Bishop Alonzo Manrique, who built chapels around the 
inner walls and removed sixty columns to make room for 
the choir. This brought forth the stern rebuke from the 
Emperor, Charles V, "You have built here what you or 
anyone might have built anywhere else, but you have 
destroyed what was unique in the world." As we en- 
tered the Church, the Choir (boys and men) were going 
from the Sacristy to the altar for the celebration of the 
Mass. The processional was led by two priests playing 
bassoons of antique form, in order to keep the singers in 
pitch with the organ. The Choir, in their gorgeous vest- 
ments, winding in and out through the forest of columns, 
the singing, the deep toned organ — all suggested a picture 
of the time of Charles V. 

June 10— Biarritz, France. Attended morning service in the 
English Church, a pretty gothic edifice, with a monument 
in the vestibule to the English officers who died in the 
battles hereabout (1813-1814). The Minister, a pale, 
careworn man, discouraged looking, had for his theme, 
"A Useless Life." We thought of this good man and his 
family, working for a pittance, and the scores of people 
who come and go to his Church, leading "useless lives" 
and spending vast sums of money. 

June 17 — Aries, France. Morning service at St. Trophime 
where we heard the famous chimes which suggested to 
the composer, Bizet, the theme for the "Carillon" in his 
orchestral suite "I'Arlesienne." 

September 16 — Chicago. The Bulletin of July 15 announced 
the death on July 11 of Mrs. William L. Grey, an old 
member of this Church. 

The Rev. Dr. McClure of McCormick Theological Seminary, oc- 
cupied the pulpit July 22 and 29. During August 
and the first two Sabbaths in September, the morning 
service was omitted. Some needed improvements have 
been made in the organ; all the pipes have been taken 
out and thoroughly cleaned; the low or international 
pitch has been installed; a new soft stop, the Aeoline, 
has been added to the swell organ; a new combination 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 149 

pedal to the choir organ; the action has been repaired 
and the whole organ tuned. 

Dr. Morison, having returned from his vacation, spoke this 
morning on the text, "For I am not ashamed." (Ro- 
mans i: 16.) 

October 9 — Tuesday, 10:30 A. M. Regular monthly meet- 
ing of the Fort Dearborn Guild was held in the Church 
parlors. Subject, "Music." Miss Tina Mae Haines read 
a paper on "The Seven Stages of Music." Convener, 
Miss Grace Chamberlain. 

October 21 — Services in connection with the unveiling of a 
tablet placed in this Church "in loving memory of the 
Rev. John Blatchford, D. D., and of Frances Wickes, 
his wife," by their sons. Mr. Eliphalet W. Blatchford, Mr. 
John S. Blatchford and Mr. Nathaniel H. Blatchford. 

Prelude — "Sonatina in E Flat" - . - - - Bach 

Anthem — "Blessed be the Lord God of Israel" Barnby 

Anthem — "The Lord Hath Commanded" Mendelssohn 

(From "Forty-second Psalm.") 
Soprano solo and men's voices. 
Offertory— "List! The Cherubic Host" - - Gaul 

The Sermon — Rev. John A. Morison, Ph. D. 
The unveiling of the tablet, by Mr. Paul Blatchford, grand- 
son of Dr. Blatchford. 
Anthem — Aria — "O Rest in the Lord" 1 

Mrs. Bracken. i ivT^„^„ioc.^v,r, 

Chorus- "He That Shall Endure f Mendelssohn 
to the End" J 

(From "Elijah.") 
Postlude — "Fugue in C Minor" - - - - Bach 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. Amv L. Northrup 
(S.), Mrs. Emma R. Campbell (A.), Mr. Frank T. John- 
son (T.) and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson (B.). 

The inscription on the tablet reads: 

To THE Glory of God axd Loving Memory of the 

ReverExd John Blatchford, D. D., 

1799-18.55 

The First Installed Pastor of this Church, 

July 1, 1S:37-August IS, 1S39 

A Consecr.\ted Man, Charitable in Spirit, Winning in 

Address, Loyal in Friendship; as a Preacher, 

Eloquent, Persuasive, Evangelistic 

His Work Abides; 

AND OF His Beloved Wife, 

Frances Wickes Blatchford, 

1805-1875, 

This Tablet is Erected by Their Grateful Sons, 

October, 1906. 



150 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

"Today, after a lapse of 68 years of marvelous change in 
the complexion of this Church and city," said Dr. Morison, 
"we are thinking of that faithful servant of God, the Rev. 
John Blatchford, the first Minister of this Church." Chicago 
in 1833 consisted of a "trading village and a military post 
with rows of log cabins and three frame stores, along the line 
of a single street at the mouth of a river that crept over a 
sand-bar to reach Lake Michigan; 300 people, including two 
companies of soldiers at the fort, comprised the entire popu- 
lation." Among the historical incidents mentioned by Dr. 
Morison, was one of particular interest to the old settlers and 
their descendants who filled the Church, "the last Indian war 
dance on the town site, enacted by 800 Pottawatomie Indians 
in 1835, outside the door of the First Presbyterian Church". 

The closing of the service was almost dramatic. Mr. 
Fernando Jones, one of the few members of Dr. Blatchford's 
Congregation still living, was in the audience. Dr. Morison, 
in closing the service, asked Mr. Jones to come to the plat- 
form that all might see him. 

"Big John Blatchford, as we all knew him in the early 
days," said Mr. Jones, his voice trembling, "wasn't only a 
preacher, he was a big brother to us all — a statesman and an 
orator, who swayed his hearers by his eloquence and fellow 
feeling. 

"There were three Johns among us then — 'Big John' 
Blatchford, 'Long John' Wentworth, and 'Little John' 
Haynes. The last two named were pioneer mayors of Chi- 
cago." 

November 11 — Dr. Morison chose for his text, "Quench not 
the Spirit," (iThess. v: 19). If nations are to be saved 
and the world lifted from degradation, it can be done 
only by the Holy Spirit of God, operating through the 
lives of His people. 

November 18 — A series of Special Musical Services com- 
menced, to continue through the winter months. The 
regular Choir will be assisted by Mrs. Amy L. Northrup 
(S.), Mrs. Emma R. Campbell (A.), Mr. H. A. Keesler 
(T.), Mr. Charles T. Atkinson (B.). Mr. Alexander 
Krauss (violin) assisted in this morning's service. 
Prelude — "Elevation in E" - - - - - Thome 

Violin solo, Mr. Krauss. 

Anthem — "Ye Shall go out with Joy" - - Barnby 

Offertory — "O Saviour, Hear Me" _ _ - Gluck 

Mr. Shaw, with violin obligate by Mr. Krauss. 

November 29 — Thursday, 10:30 A. M. Union Thanksgiving 
Service of the Plymouth Congregational, Wabash Avenue 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. Inl 

M. E., Trinity M. E., and Immanuel Baptist Churches, 
held in the First Presbyterian Church. 

Prelude — "Sonata in F Minor" - - Mendelssohn 

Anthem — "Ye Shall go out with Joy" - - Barnby 

Anthem — "I Will Mention" _ _- _ _ Sullivan 

Offertory — "Judge me, O God" - - - - Buck 

Mr. Holmquist. 

The Sermon — Rev. Louis F. W. Leseman, Trinity M. E. 

Church. 

Anthem — "Sing Praises to God" _ _ _ Wareing 

Postlude — "Concerto in G" _ _ _ _ Handel 

The Choir: ]\Irs. Pennington Haughey and Mrs. Cornelia 
Delafontaine, sopranos; ]\Iiss Byrde Fisher and Mrs. 
Emma R. Campbell, altos; Mr. Alfred D. Shaw and Mr. 
H. A. Keesler, tenors; Mr. Gustave Holmquist and Mr. 
Charles T. Atkinson, basses; Mr. Wilhelm Middelschulte, 
(O.). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

December 2 — Mr. Alexander Krauss (violin) and Mr. Enrico 
Tramonti (harp), assisted. 

Prelude— "The loOth Psalm" - _ - _ Gounod 

Violin, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Sing Praises to God" _ _ _ Wareing 

With violin obligate. 
Offertory~"Be Ye All of One Mind" - - Godfrey 

Accompanied by violin, harp and organ. 
Organ Postlude — "Prelude and Fugue in D Minor" Bach 

The sermon by the Minister was based on thoughts suggested 
by the words of the anthem, "Be ye all of one mind." 
(I Peter iii: 8-12.) 

December 16 — The Choir was assisted by Mr. Alfred Barthel 
(oboe and English horn), Mr. Bruno Steindel ('cello) and 
Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp). 
Prelude — "Romance" ----- Saint-Saens 

Oboe, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Advent Anthem — "O Saving Victim" - - Gounod 
English horn Solo — "Nocturne" - - Fontbonne 

Offertory — "Heavenly Light" - - _ - Gounod 
Mrs. Trimble. 
Accompanied by oboe, 'cello, harp and organ. 
Solo for oboe — "Melodic Religieuse" - - Dubois 

Mr. Barthel, accompanied by 'cello, harp and organ. 
Organ Postlude — "Toccata in D Minor" - - Bach 

Mr. Moore. 

December 22 — Saturday afternoon. Funeral services of Mr. 
Elisha Paxton Whitehead, a member of the Board of 
Deacons of this Church, held from the family residence, 
1932 Calumet avenue, conducted by Dr. Alorison. Mr. 
Marion Green (B.) sang a lew hymns. Mr. Whitehead 
died December 20, 1900. 



152 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

December 23 — Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude — "The Shepherds and the Magi" - - Rousseau 

With solos for English horn and violin. 
Anthem — "And the Glory of the Lord" - - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 
Anthem — "Say, Where is He Born" - - Mendelssohn 
Anthem— "Brightest and Best" - - - H. W. Parker 
Violoncello Solo — "Intermezzo" ("First Suite") Piern6 

Mr. Steindel. 
Offertory — Recitative — "Behold, a Virgin Shall 

Conceive" _____ tj„„j^i 

Aria and chorus— "O Thou That ^ -Handel 
Tellest" ______ 

(From "The Messiah.") 
Mrs. Bracken. 
The Sermon — Rev. John A. Morison, D. D. 
Violin Solo — "Meditation" - - _ _ Bach-Gounod 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "For Unto us a Child Is Born" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir of eight voices was assisted by the Lyric 
Choral Club (19 voices). 

The orchestra: Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Frederick 
Stock (violins), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. 
Joseph Beckel and Mr. Louis Kletnm (double basses), Mr. 
Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Leopold de Mare (French 
horn), Mr. Alfred Barthel (oboe and English horn), Mr. 
Enrico Tramonti (harp). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choir- 
master. 

December 30 — The Choir was assisted by Mr. Alfred Barthel 
(oboe and English horn), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violon- 
cello) and Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp). 

Prelude — "Reverie" ______ Ganne 

For oboe, 'cello, harp and organ. 
Christmas Anthem — "Calm on the List'ning Ear of Night" 
--------- H. W. Parker 

Solo for oboe — "Christmas Night" _ _ _ Hugenin 

Mr. Barthel, accompanied by harp. 
Offertory — "Nazareth" _____ Gounod 

Accompanied by oboe, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Mr. Green. 
The Sermon— Rev. James G. K. McClure, D. D., Subject: "The 
Joy and Responsibility of the Knowledge of Christ's Birth." 
Violoncello Solo — "Berceuse" _ _ _ _ Godard 

Accompanied by harp and organ. 
Mr. Steindel. 
Organ Postlude — "Offertory on Two Christmas Hymns" 

---------- Guilmant 

Mr. Moore. 




MRS CLARA G TRIMBLE. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 153 

1907 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble and Mrs. Amy L. Northrup, 
sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. Bracken and Mrs. Emma R. 
Campbell, altos; Mr. Alfred D. Shaw and Mr. Frank T. 
Johnson, tenors; Mr. Marion Green and Mr. Charles T. 
Atkinson, basses; Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). Mr. Philo 
Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

January 20 — Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp) assisted. 

Prelude — "Andante con moto" - - - - Schubert 

Harp and organ. 
Anthem — "For His is the Sea" - - - Mendelssohn 

(From "The 95th Psalm.") 

Anthem— "No Evil Shall Befall Thee" - - Costa 

(From "Eli.") 

For women's voices, accompanied by harp and organ. 

The Minister spoke on "Temptation." Text, "When I would 
do good, evil is present with me." (Romans vii:21.) 

January 27 — Mr. Alexander Krauss (vioUn), Mr. Leopold de 
Mare (French horn), Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp). 
Prelude — "Meditation! Hosanna" - - Louis Deffes 
Anthem — "Calm on the List'ning Ear of Night" 

--------- H. W. Parker 

Accompanied by violin, French horn, harp and organ. 
Offertory — "Forever with the Lord" - - - Gounod 
Mrs. Bracken, accompanied by violin, French horn, harp 

and organ. 
Horn Solo — "Andante Pastorale" - - Paul Vidal 

Mr. de Mare. 

February 17 — 

Prelude — "Ave Verum Corpus" - - - - Mozart 

Violin, French horn, harp and organ. 

Anthem — "Be Ye All of One Mind" - - - Godfrey 

Accompanied by violin, French horn, harp and organ. 

Preacher, Rev. E. M. Wherry of Lodiana, India, spoke of his 
many years of missionary work in India. 

February 24 — 

Prelude — "Invocation" _____ Ganne 

Violin, French horn, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Charity" ______ Rossini 

Women's vioces, accompanied by violin, French horn, 
harp and organ. 
Offertory — "The Lord is my Light" _ - - Allitsen 
Mr. Green, accompanied by violin, French horn, harp 
and organ. 

March 3 — Communion. Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp) assist- 
ed the Choir. 

Prelude — "Pastorale in A" - - - - - Guilmant 
Harp and organ. 



154 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Harp Solo— "Andante Religiose" - - Hasselmans 

Mr. Tramonti. 
Offertory — "Christ, When a Child" - - Tschaikowsky 

March 17— Memorial Service for Mrs. Frederick Raymond 
Otis, whose death occurred March 8, 1907. Mr. Alfred 
Quensel (flute), Mr. Bruno Steindel ('cello), Mr. Enrico 
Tramonti (harp) assisted in this service. 

Prelude — "Meditation" _ _ - _ _ Ganne 

For flute, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Blessed Jesus, Fount of Mercy" - Dvorak 

Violoncello Solo — "Melodic" - - - Charpentier 

Mr. Steindel. 
Accompanied by flute, harp and organ. 
Offertory — "O Lamb of God" - - - - Gounod 
Sermon — Rev. John Archibald Morison, Ph. D. 
Anthem — "The Twenty-third Psalm" - - Schubert 

For women's voices. 

Organ Postlude — "Funeral March" - - - Chopin 

Mr. Moore. 

Emeline Tillinghast, daughter of Oliver Cromwell TiUing- 
hast, was born May 19, 1828, in Berlin, "lirie County, Ohio, 
and was married to Mr. Otis, December 27, 1848. The family 
came to Chicago in 1869. On November 4, 1870, Mrs. Otis 
was received by letter from the Congregational Church of 
Berlin, Ohio, into the membership of the Calvary Pres- 
byterian Church. For twenty-five years Mrs. Otis had been 
a member of the Board of Managers of the Old People's 
Home. 
March 24 — Palm Sunday. Special musical service. Mr. 

Marc Lagen (T.) in the absence of Mr. Shaw. 

The orchestra: Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Frederick 
Stock (violins), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. 
Joseph Beckel and Mr. Louis Klemm (double basses) , 
Mr. Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Leopold de Mare (French 
horn), Mr. Alfred Barthel (oboe and English horn), Mr. 
Enrico Tramonti (harp). 

Prelude — "Hymne a Sainte Cecile" - - - Gounod 

Anthem — "Brightest and Best" - - - H. W. Parker 

Solo for EngUsh horn — "Largo" ("New World Symphony") 

---------- Dvorak 

Mr. Barthel. 
Anthem — "O Saving Victim" - - - _ Gounod 
The Sermon — Rev. John Archibald Morison, Ph. D. 
Anthem — "See now the Altar, Garlanded with Flowers" 
--------- Faure-Buck 

Organ Postlude — "Allegro Moderate" from "Second So- 
nata" ________ Guilmant 

Mr. Moore. 



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CARYL VUUXG. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 155 

The funeral services of Mr. Caryl Young were held at 
2:00 P.M., from his late residence, 4723 Woodlawn avenue, 
conducted by Dr. Morison, with the assistance of the Imperial 
Quartette. In the passing of Mr. Young, the First Church 
loses an earnest, faithful friend, one who was devoted, heart 
and soul, to its interests. Mr. Young was elected a member 
of the Board of Trustees, December 2, 1895, which office he 
held until his death. Mr. Young was a member of the Board 
of Managers of the Chicago Orphan Asylum. He was born 
December 13, 183G, in Schenectady, N. Y.; came to Chicago 
in 1857; died March 22, 1907. 
March 31 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude — "Melodie Religieuse" - - - - Dubois 

Anthem— "Lord! Thou Alone Art God" (from "St. Paul.") 
--------- Mendelssohn 

Anthem — "I Shall not Die, hut Live" - H. W. Parker 

Soprano Solo — Recitative, "And God said: 'Let the 

Earth' ") (from "The Creation") Haydn 

Aria, "With Verdure Clad" 

Mrs. Trimble. 

Violoncello Solo — "Intermezzo" - - - - Pierne 

Mr. Steindel. 
Anthem — Recitative, "And God Created Man" Haydn 

Aria, "In Native Worth" 
Mr. Lagen. 
Duet, "By Thee with Bliss" 

Mrs. Trimble and Mr. Green. 
Chorus, "Forever Blessed be His Power" 
(From "The Creation.") 
The Sermon — Rev. John Archibald Morison, Ph. D. 
Viohn Solo — "Largo" ------ Handel 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir of eight voices (Mr. Marc Lagen (T.) in the 
absence of Mr. Shaw) was assisted by the Lyric Choral 
Club (18 voices). 

The orchestra: Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Frederick 
Stock (violins), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. 
Joseph Beckel and Mr. Louis Klemm (double basses) , 
Mr. Alfred Ouensel (flute), Mr. Alfred Barthel (oboe and 
English horn), Mr. Leopold de Mare (French horn), Mr. 
Enrico Tramonti (harp) , Mr. Joseph Zettelmann (kettle- 
drums, Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). Mr. Philo Adams 
Otis, choirmaster. 

April 7 — The regular Choir only. 



156 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Anthem — "I am He that Liveth" - - Oliver King 

Offertory — "My Hope is in the Everlasting" - Stainer 

Mr. Shaw. 

The Rev. Hugh Black, preacher. "The day of the Lord is a 
proverb with the Prophets. Isaiah was a patriot. No 
patriotism like that of the Prophets. They were lovers 
of Israel. With them Jerusalem was the Holy City, as 
well as the seat of government." 

April 28— 

Prelude — "Adagio" ("Fifth Symphony") - Saint-Saens 

Anthem— "O Send out Thy Light" - - - Calkin 

Anthem — "I Will Mention" _ _ _ _ Sullivan 

Offertory — "While we have Time" - - H. W. Parker 
Anthem — "The Lord Hath Commanded" Mendelssohn 

(From "Forty-second Psalm.") 
For soprano solo and men's voices. 

The Choir was assisted by Mr. Frank T. Johnson (T.) and Mr. 

Charles T. Atkinson (B.). 
The Minister chose for his text, "Today shalt thou be with 

Me in Paradise." (St. Luke xxiii: 43.) 

May 5 — 

Anthem — "And Suddenly there Came" - Henry J. Wood 
Mr. Green and quartette. 

Preacher, Rev. Dr. Dickey, of the American Chapel in Berlin. 
Text, "And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw 
all men unto Me." (St. John xii: 32.) 

May 10 — Friday evening, 7:45 P. M. Fiftieth Anniversary 
of Railroad Mission, under the auspices of the First Pres- 
byterian Church. The exercises consisted of addresses 
by the Rev. Albert McCalla, the Rev. John Archibald 
Morison, D. D., the Rev. Charles M. Morton and the 
Rev. Sherman L. Devine. 

June 3 — Monday, 10:30 A. M. Presbytery met in this 
Church to receive the resignation of the Rev. W. J. Mc- 
Caughan,^ Minister of the Third Presbyterian Church, 
Chicago, (October, 1898-June, 1909), who has accepted 
a call to the May Street Presbyterian Church of Belfast, 
Ireland. 

Some of our vacation days were passed at the James- 
town, Va., Exposition. 

June 23 — Richmond, Va. Morning service at St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church, at which President Jefferson Davis 

' Mr. and Mrs. McCaughan were seriously injured July 26, 1910, while escaping 
from a burning hotel at Belfast. Both died soon after; Mr. McCaughan, July 31, and 
his wife, August U. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 157 

was a regular attendant in war-times. On a Sunday 
evening in April, 18G5, Mr. Davis was in his customary 
place at Church when a message from General Lee was 
brought to him, that Richmond must be evacuated that 
night. 

In the afternoon, to the Third Presbyterian Church, of which 
the Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., was Minister (1859- 
ISGl). 

The Church remained open during the summer months 
with regular Sunday morning preaching services; the Rev. 
Edgar P. Hill, D. D., occupied the pulpit July 14, 21 and 28. 

The Rev. J. G. K. McClure, D. D., August 4, (subject, 
"Renewing Strength,") 11, 18 and September 1, (subject, 
"Voices and Visions"). 

The Rev. E. V. Newcomb, D. D., of Keokuk, Iowa, 
August 25. 

Dr. Morison returned from his summer vacation, occu- 
pying the pulpit on September 8. 

October 13 — 

Prelude — "Suite Gothique" — "Chorale" and "Minuet Goth- 

ique" --_-___ Boellmann 

Anthem — "Sing to the Lord of Harvest" - - Barnby 

Anthem — "O Come, Every One That Thirsteth" 

--------- Mendelssohn 

(From "Elijah.") 
Postlude — "Toccata" ----- Boellmann 

Mr. Moore. 

October 20— Preacher, the Rev. Edgar P. Hill, D. D. Sub- 
ject, "Home Missions." Text, "Alas! that great City 
Babylon." (Rev. xviii: 10.) Henrich Heine wrote (100 
years ago) of his experiences on his first visit to London. 
Thomas Carlyle was much impressed with the crowds in 
the streets of London; Paul has given us his thoughts 
on a visit to Athens; five million foreigners came to 
America in the last six years; every fourth man on the 
Island of Manhattan is a Jew. 

November 24 — A series of Special Musical Services com- 
menced, to continue until Easter, April 19, 1908; the 
additional cost being borne by a few men and women of 
the Congregation. The regular Choir will be assisted by 
Mrs. Amy L. Northrup (S.), Mrs. James C. Ames (A.), 
Mr. C. H. Ogden (T.) and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson (B.). 
Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp) will take part in every 
service with one or more of the following instrumental 



158 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

players: Mr. Alexander Krauss (violin), Mr. Bruno 
Steindel ('cello), Mr. Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Alfred 
Barthel (oboe and English horn) and Mr. Leopold de 
Mare (French horn). 
Prelude — "The Sleep of the Infant Jesus" - Busser 

VioHn, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Sing Praises to God" _ _ _ Wareing 

Anthem — "O Gladsome Light" - - - - Sullivan 
Offertory — "The Sovereignty of God" - - AlHtsen 

Mr. Graham Smith. 

Violin Solo — "Berceuse" _____ Dubois 

Accompanied by harp and organ. 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "Festival March" - - Claussman 

Mr. Moore. 

December 1 — 

Prelude — "Elegie" _____ Boisdeffre 

Flute, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem for Advent — "Blessed Jesus" - - Dvorak 
Violoncello Solo — "Melodic" _ _ _ Charpentier 

Mr. Steindel. 
Accompanied by flute, harp and organ. 
OfTertory — "O Lamb of God" _ _ _ _ Gounod 
Anthem — "The Twenty-third Psalm" - - Schubert 

For women's voices. 

Organ Postlude — "Overture to "The Messiah" Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

December 8 — Mr. Alexander Krauss (violin) and Mr. Leo- 
pold de Mare (French horn) assisted. 
Prelude — "Melodic Religieuse" - - - - Sandre 

For violin, French horn, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Great is Jehovah" _ _ _ _ Schubert 

Anthem — "Say, Watchman, What of the Night" Sullivan 
Offertory — "In Dreams I've Heard the Seraphs Fair" 

__________ Faure 

Mrs. Trimble. 

Accompanied by violin, French horn, harp and organ. 

Organ Postlude — "March in C" - - - - Bossi 

Mr. Moore. 

December 10 — Tuesday, 10:30 A. M. The regular meeting 
of the Fort Dearborn Guild was held in the Church par- 
lors. Reading by Mrs. Burton Hanson and songs by 
Miss Lulu Chilson. Conveners, Miss Elizabeth Baker 
and Miss C. B. Neeley. 

December 22 — Mr. Alexander Krauss (violin), Mr. Bruno 
Steindel ('cello), Mr. Alfred Barthel (oboe and English 
horn), Mr. Joseph Beckel and Mr. Louis Klemm (double 
basses), and Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp) assisted. 

Prelude — "Melodic Religieuse" _ - - - Dubois 

Oboe solo, Mr. Barthel. 
Antliem — "O'er the Distant Mountains Breaking" - Otis 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 159 

Christmas Carol — "The Angels and the Shepherds" 

---------- Reidel 

Eight voices unaccompanied. 
Offertory — "Nazareth" _ _ _ _ - Gounod 

Mrs. Bracken. 
The Sermon — Rev. John A. Morison, D. D. Text, "And 

Thou Bethlehem" (St. Matt, ii: 6). 
Duo for Violin and Oboe — "Meditation" - - Dubois 

Messrs. Krauss and Barthel. 

Organ Postlude — "Marche Religieuse" - - Guilmant 

Mr. Moore. 

December 29 — Christmas Celebration : 

Prelude — "The Pastoral Symphony" - - Bach 

Anthem — "Say, Where is He Born" (From "Christus") 

--------- Mendelssohn 

Cantata — "The Shepherd's Vision" - - H. W. Parker 
Violoncello Solo — "Meditation-Priere" - - Dubois 

Mr. Steindel. 
Offertory — "Comfort Ye, My People" - - Handel 

"Every Valley Shall be Exalted" 
(From "The Messiah.") 
Mr. Shaw. 
Christmas Sermon — Rev. John A. Morison, D. D. 
Violin Solo — "Meditation" - - - - Bach-Gounod 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "And the Glory of the Lord" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by the Lyric Choral Club (15 
voices). 

The orchestra: ]\Ir. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Frederick 
Stock (violins), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. 
Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Alfred Barthel (oboe and 
EngHsh horn), Mr. Leopold de Mare (French horn), Mr. 
Enrico Tramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph Zettelmann (kettle- 
drums), Mr. Joseph BeckeP and Mr. Louis Klemm 
(double basses). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 



1908 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble and Mrs. Amy Leech North- 
rup, sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. Bracken and Mrs. James C. 
Ames, altos; Mr. Alfred D. Shaw and Mr. C. H. Ogden, 
tenors; Mr. Graham Smith and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, 
basses. Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). Mr. Philo Adams 
Otis, choirmaster. 

January 19 — The following men of the Congregation acted as 
a Reception Committee during the winter months: 

1 Mr. Joseph Beckel. principal bass and a faithful member of the Thomas Orches- 
tra, since its organization in 1891, died in Chicago, April 4, 1908. 



160 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Col. Charles Alling, Jr., Chairman 

Mr. William Sumner Smith Mr. Earl C. Greenman 

Mr. J. A. Mitchell Mr. Henry C. Davis 

Mr. Walter B. Smith Mr. Bradford Wells 

Mr. F. E. May Mr. Henry W. Dudley 

Mr. Alfred E. Hamill Mr. Augustus H. Downs 

Mr. Albert J. Little Mr. Wm. A. Magie 

Mr. Edward J. Dykstra (B.), Mr. Smith, resigned. 

Prelude — "Andante con moto" - - - - Schubert 

Harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Sing, O Heavens" - - - - Tours 

Harp Solo — "Melodic" ------ Gounod 

Mr. Tramonti. 

Offertory — "Fear Ye not, O Israel" - - - Buck 

Mr. Dykstra. 

February 2 — Mr. Wilhelm Middleschulte^ (O.) in the absence 
of Mr. Moore. Mr. William Beard (B.), Mr. Dykstra, 
resigned. 

Prelude— "Adagio" from Trio, Op. 5 - - Foote 

Harp and organ. 

Offertory — "Like as the Hart Desireth" - - AUitsen 

Mr. Beard. 

Accompanied by harp and organ. 

Chritsmas Song — "Under the Silent Stars" - Coombs 

For women's voices, accompanied by harp and organ. 

February 16 — We celebrated today in this Church, the an- 
niversary of the capture of Fort Donelson, February 16, 
1862, forty-six years ago. The surviving members of 
Taylor's Battery, who took part in the battle, wor- 
shipped with us this morning. Taylor's Battery was 
organized in Chicago in the spring of 1861. Five days 
prior to their departure for the front, on Sunday morning. 
May 28, 1861, the men attended Divine worship in the 
First Church, then on Wabash avenue at Congress street, 
and were addressed by the Minister, the Rev. Z. M. 
Humphrey, D. D. 

Prelude — "Ave Verum Corpus" - - - - Mozart 

Violin, French horn, harp and organ. 

Anthem — "A Mighty Fortress is our God" - Luther 

Anthem — "Souls of the Righteous" - - - Noble 

Accompanied by organ and drums. 

Offertory — "Land of Hope and Glory" - - Elgar 



' Mr. Wilhelm Middelschulte. organist and composer, came to Chicago in 1891 . 
He has filled positions at the Cathedral of the Holy Name, People's Church and Uni- 
versity Congregational Church. In recent years he has been with the St. James Ro- 
man Catholic Church. His principal works are for orchestra and organ; "Passacag- 
lia," "Toccata" and "Concerto on a Theme from Bach," and were written for the 
Chicago Orchestra, of which he is the organist. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 161 

Anthem — "The American Hymn" - _ _ Keller 

Organ Postlude — "The Star Spangled Banner" Buck 

Mr. Moore. 

A patriotic address — Dr. Morison. Text, "But the people 
that do know their God shall be strong, and do ex- 
ploits." (Daniel xi: 32.) 

March 8 — 

Anthem — "Sweet the Moments" _ _ _ Godfrey 

. Accomjjanied by harp and organ. 
Evening Hymn — "Shades of Eve are Falling" Buck 

For women's voices, accompanied by harp and organ. 

Postlude — "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor" - Bach 

Mr. Moore. 

The Rev. H. G. Underwood, preacher, for many years a mis- 
sionary in Korea. 

March 15 — 

Anthem — "The Love of God" - - - - Foster 

Accompanied by violin, harp and organ. 
Harp Solo — "Romance" _ _ _ _ Rubinstein 

Mr. Tramonti. 

Offertory — "Henceforth, When Ye Hear" Mendelssohn 

(From "The Ninety-fifth Psalm.") 

Mr. Shaw and chorus, accompanied by harp and organ. 

March 24 — Tuesday, 8 P. M. Stereopticon lecture on "Japan" 
by Mr. Tracy C. Drake, for the benefit of the Men's 
League. Two hundred beautifully colored pictures were 
shown. 

March 29 — Lenten Service : 

Prelude — "Romance" ----- Saint-Saens 

Oboe, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "O Saving Victim" - - - - Gounod 

Passion Music — Aria, "Our God, the Heavenly Circle Filling" 
---------- Handel 

Mrs. Trimble. 
Chorus, "With Jesus I will Watch and 
Pray" ----- Bach 

Mr. Shaw and chorus, accompanied by oboe, violoncello, 

harp and organ. 
Offertory — "There is a Green Hill" _ - _ Gounod 
Duo for English horn and 'cello — "Simple Confession" 

---------- Thom6 

Messrs. Steindel and Barthel, accompanied by harp and 
organ. 

April 12 — The Choir was assisted by Messrs. Krauss (violin), 
Steindel ('cello), Barthel (oboe and EngHsh horn), 
Klemm and Parbs (double basses), and Tramonti (harp). 
Prelude — "Meditation" _ _ _ - - Dubois 

Messrs. Krauss and Barthel. 
Anthem — "O'er the Distant Mountains Breaking" Otis 



162 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Anthem — "Land of Hope and Glory" - - Elgar 

Offertory — "Nazareth" _ _ - - _ Gounod 

Anthem — "Palm Branches" _ - _ Faure-Buck 

Mr. Beard and chorus. 

Organ Postlude — "Marche Pontificale" - - Lemmens 

Mr. Moore. 

April 19 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude — "An Easter Meditation" - - Carolus-Duran 
Anthem — "As it Began to Dawn" - _ _ Foster 

Anthem — "Behold, Ye Despisers" - - H. W. Parker 
Anthem— "Lord! Thou Alone Art God" (From "St.Paul.") 
--------- Mendelssohn 

Easter Sermon — Rev. John A. Morison, Ph. D. 
Violoncello Solo — "Meditation-Priere" - - Dubois 

Mr. Steindel. 

Offertory — "I Know That My Redeemer Liveth" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mrs. Trimble. 

Viohn Solo — "Largo" ------ Handel 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "The Hallelujah Chorus" - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir of eight voices (Mr. Edward J. Walker (T.) 
in place of Mr. Alfred D. Shaw^ resigned) was assisted 
by the Lyric Choral Club (14 voices). 

The orchestra: Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Frederick 
Stock (violins), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. 
Louis Klemm and Mr. Hans Parbs (double basses), Mr. 
Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Alfred Barthel (oboe and 
English horn), Mr. Leopold de Mare (French horn), 
Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph Zettlemann 
(kettle-drums). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

Mr. Frederick Stock, who has taken part for some years 
past in our Christmas and Easter Celebrations, came from 
Cologne in 1894, as a member (viola) of the Chicago Orches- 
tra. On the death of Mr. Thomas, January 4, 1905, Mr. 
Stock was elected conductor. 

The large Choir with the instrumental players, was dis- 
continued today, to be resumed in the autumn. 
May 31— 

Offertory — "How Vain is Man" - - - - Handel 

Mr. Walker. 
Anthem — "Toil and Rest" _____ Otis 



1 Mr. Shaw, on leaving Chicago, went to the First Presbyterian Church, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa.; thence to the Central Congregational Church of Brooklyn, N. Y.; later to 
the West End Presbyterian Church. New York City. He is now (1913) with the Fifth 
Avenue Presbyterian Church, New York City. 




RoHIiRT M WELLS. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 163 

July 5 — 

Prelude — "Vorspiel" ("Lohengrin") - - - Wagner 
Anthem — "Thou Visitest the Earth" - - Barnby 

, Mr. Albert Borrofif (B.) in the absence of Mr. Beard. 

The bulletin announced the death on June 26th, of Mr. 

Raymond Chapin Wells, son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. 

Wells ^ 

Preaching services were maintained during the summer 

months. 

July 19— The Rev. A. C. Manson, D. D., Chicago. 

July 26— Prof. Nathaniel Butler of the University of Chi- 
cago. 

August 2 to 30— The Rev. A. B. Marshall, D. D., of Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

September 6 — Prof. Nathaniel Butler of the University of 
Chicago. During August, services were held in the 
lecture room in order that repairs might be made in 
the main audience room. 

The bulletin of August 30, announced the death on 
August 25 of Mrs. W. B. Jenks, mother of Miss Jessica 
Jenks and Mr. John G. Jenks. Mrs. Jenks was an old 
member of the Church and greatly interested in mission and 
benevolent work. 

Dr. Morison resumed his work on September 13. 
September 27 — Mr. Albert DeRiemer (B.) in the absence of 

Mr. Beard. Choir assisted today by Miss Piralda Boedisch 

(S.) and Mrs. James C. Ames (A.). 
October 4 — Mr. Adair Hickman (T.) in place of Mr. Edward 

J. Walker (resigned). 

Offertory— "Today, if Ye Will Hear His Voice" - Rogers 
Mr. Hickman. 

October 18 — Bulletin announced the death of Mr. Stephen A. 
Douglas, October 8, 1908. Mr. Douglas was the son of 
Judge Stephen A. Douglas, Democratic candidate for 
President of the United States in 1860, who was defeated 
by Abraham Lincoln. Mr. Douglas, the younger, was 
for many years an earnest, faithful worker at Railroad 
Chapel. 



1 Mr. Robert M. Wells was bom .\ugust 30, 1848, in Connecticut; came to Chi- 
cago when a lad; member of hardware firm of Wells & Nellegar; later Vice-President of 
Bankers' National Bank; for many years an active worker in the First Church; died 
September 8, 1913, in Chicago. 



164 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

November 15 — Special Musical Services similar to those of 
the preceding winter, with large Choir and instrumental 
players, were resumed today. Choir: Mrs. Clara G. 
Trimble and Mrs. Amy L. Northrup, sopranos; Mrs. W. 
S. Bracken and Mrs. James C. Ames, altos; Mr. Adair 
Hickman and Mr. C. H. Ogden, tenors; Mr. William 
Beard and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, basses. 
Prelude — "Priere in F" _____ Guilmant 

Harp and organ. 
Offertory — "Henceforth, When Ye Hear His Voice" 

— — — — — — — — — Mendelssohn 

Mr. Hickman and chorus, accompanied by harp and organ. 

November 26 — Thursday, 11:00 A. M., Union Thanksgiving 
Service; Central Immanuel Baptist, Trinity M. E., Wa- 
bash avenue M. E., Armour Mission, Doremus Congre- 
gational, Plymouth Congregational and the First Presby- 
terian Churches, held in the First Presbyterian Church. 

The Choir: Miss Delia Henney and Mrs. J. R. McGlashan, 
sopranos; Mrs. James C. Ames and Miss Borglgot Aalrud, 
altos; Mr. Adair Hickman and Mr. C. H. Ogden, tenors; 
Mr. Gustave Holmquist and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, 
basses. 
Offertory — "Sing to the Lord of Harvest" - Barnby 

Sermon by the Rev. Joseph A. Milburn, Minister of Plymouth 
Congregational Church. 
Solo — "The Lord is my Light" _ _ _ - Allitsen 

Mr. Holmquist. 

Postlude — "Harvest Thanksgiving March" - Calkin 

Mr. Moore. 

November 29 — 

Prelude — "A Russian Hymn" - _ _ - GUnka 

Flute, viola, harp and organ. 
Anthem— "Still, Still With Thee" _ _ _ Foote 

Accompanied by flute, viola, harp and organ. 

Solo for viola — "Morning Hymn" - Richard Strauss 

Mr. Esser, accompanied by flute, harp and organ. 

A letter was issued December 2, by Dr. Morison and the 
Session to members of the Church, regarding the approaching 
Diamond Jubilee: 

"Doubtless it is well known by all our members that our 
beloved First Church, in the Providence of God, completed 
its seventy-five years of active Church work in June, last, and 
that we are about to celebrate its Diamond Jubilee. 

"The Session extends its affectionate greetings and wishes 
all members might be present with us during the coming 
week and share in the joys and festivities of the occasion. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 165 

"That our Church may continue its influence and work 
with ever increasing power, the Session has proposed that a 
Diamond Jubilee Commemorative Fund be raised and 
placed in the hands of a representative committee; the fund 
so raised to be held in trust by said committee, the uses and 
disposition of said fund to be determined upon by the Session 
of the Church." 

John Archibald Morison, Ph. D., Minister. 

Charles Alling, Jr. James M. Emery 

Charles E. Baker James W. Janney 

Samuel Baker George S. Matheson 

Hamilton Borden Philo A. Otis 

S. Leonard Boyce Josiah W. Perine 

Henry W. Dudley Henry H. Munger, Clerk. 

Seventy-Fifth Anniversary 

(Diamond Jubilee) 

1833-1908. 

December Sixth, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, 

Nineteen Hundred and Eight. 

December 6 — 

Prelude — "Meditation" _ _ _ _ Carolus-Duran 

Solo for oboe, Mr. Barthel. 
Chorale — "A Mighty Fortress is our God" - Luther 

Official Congratulations — Hon. Winfield P. Dunn, Alderman 
25th Ward, on behalf of the City of Chicago. 
Major General Edward C. Young, I. N. G., represent- 
ing Governor Charles S. Deneen, on behalf of the 
State of IlHnois. 
Anthem — "The Glories of the Messiah" - - - Otis 
The Sermon — Historical. Text: "Thy servants take pleasure 
in her stones." (Psalm cii: 14.) Rev. John Archibald 
Morison, D. D. 
Offertory — "Land of Hope and Glory" - - Elgar 

Organ Postlude — "The Star Spangled Banner" Buck 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Mrs. Amy Leech Northrup 
and Miss Lillian White, sopranos; Mrs.Willard S. Bracken, 
Mrs. James C. Ames and Miss Margaret Blood, altos; 
Mr. Adair Hickman and Mr. C. H. Ogden, tenors; Mr. 
William Beard and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, basses. 

The Orchestra : Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Richard Seidel 
(violins), Mr. Franz H. Esser and Mr. George Dasch 
(violas), Mr. Joseph Zettelmann (kettle-drums) , ]\Ir. Alfred 
Barthel (oboe and English horn) , Mr. Leopold de Mare 
(French horn) , Mr. Louis Klemm and ]\Ir. Hans Parbs 
(double basses), Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp). Mr. 
Francis S. Moore (O.). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 



166 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

The presence at this service of Company A, First Regi- 
ment, I. N. G., seemed fitting, as the Church was founded 
amid military surroundings. 

Jubilee Celebration by the Home Sunday-school 

12:15 P. M. 

Col. Charles Ailing, Jr., Superintendent. 

Addresses on the history of the school by Mrs. Charles T. 

Atkinson and Mr. Henry M. Curtis. 

Jubilee Celebration at Railroad Mission 

3:00 P. M. 

Col. James M. Emery, Superintendent. 

Addresses: "Historical Data of Railroad Mission," Mr. 

Heijry M. Curtis. 

"Early Days of the Mission," Mr. N. D. Pratt. 

"Old Time Superintendents," Mr. H, M. Bacon. 

Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor 
6:30 P.M. 
Short addresses by the State and City Presidents of the 
Society and by Charter Members. 

The Celebration of the Lord's Supper 

7:45 P. M. 

Prelude — "Air in D" - - - - - - Bach 

Anthem — "Festival Gloria in Excelsis in D" - Buck 

By the regular Choir. 
Anthem — "The King of Love my Shepherd is" Shelley 

Offertory — "My Redeemer and my Lord" - Buck 

Mrs. Trimble. 
The Sermon — "The Catholicity of Presbyterianism." 
The Sacrament of the Lord's Supper — Members of Sessions 
of the following Churches, taking their origin from the 
First Presbyterian Church, assisted in the distribution 
of the Elements: Second, Third, Fourth, Forty-first 
Street, South Park and Plymouth Congregational. 
Postlude — "Postlude in F" _____ Gade 

Mr. Moore. 

Tuesday Evening, December 8th, 8 :30 P. M. 

Diamond Jubilee Function of the 

Fort Dearborn Guild. 

An original monologue by Miss Marjorie Benton Cooke, 

Wednesday Evening, December 9th, 8 :00 P. M. 
Fellowship Meeting, 
Short addresses were made by, and messages were read 
from early members of the Church. 

Thursday Evening, December 10th, 6:00 P. M. 

Diamond Jubilee Meeting of the 

Men's League. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 167 

Dinner was served in the lecture room of the Church 
under the management of the Men's League, to 110 guests 
representing the Presbyterian Brotherhood of Chicago. 

The speakers at the dinner were: The Rev. John Bal- 
com Shaw, D. D., Second Presbyterian Church, the Rev, 
Martin D. Hardin, D. D., Third Presbyterian Church, the 
Rev. Charles M. Morton, former Minister of Railroad Mission, 
the Rev. Edward H. Curtis, D. D., Woodlawn Park Presby- 
terian Church, the Rev. William C. Covert, D. D., Forty-first 
Street Presbyterian Church, the Rev. James Frothingham, 
D. D., Stated Clerk Presbytery of Chicago. 

At the meeting following the dinner in the auditorium 
of the Church, 8:00 P. M., addresses were made by Judge 
Charles G. Neely, President of the Presbyterian Brotherhood 
of Chicago, the Rev. William P. Merrill, D. D., Sixth Presby- 
terian Church, Mr. Charles S. Holt, President Presbyterian 
Brotherhood of America, Mr. William R. Stirling, Brother- 
hood of St. Andrew, the Rev. Austin K. de Blois, D. D., 
First Baptist Church, Hon. Thomas C. MacMillan, Moderator 
National Congregational Councils, the Rev. Lorenzo D. Case 
D. D., St. Paul's Universalist Church, and the Rev. E. W. 
Oneal, First Methodist Church. Mr. Adam Craig led the 
singing, with Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 

December 13 — 

Prelude — "A Swedish Hymn" - - - - Benoist 

Flute, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem for Advent — "Blessed Jesus, Fount of Mercy" 
---------- Dvorak 

Offertory — "Jesus, Lover of my Soul" - - Brookes 

Mrs. Bracken. 

Duo for flute and violoncello — "Ave Maria" - Leroux 

Messrs. Quensel and Steindel, accompanied by harp and 

organ. 

December 27 — Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude — "The Pastoral Symphony" - - Bach 

Cantata — "The Shepherd's Vision" - - H. W. Parker 
Christmas Hymn — "Wondrous Words of Love" - Otis 
Solo for violoncello — "Adagio Pathetique" - Godard 

Mr. ^Steindel. 

Offertory— "Thus Saith the Lord of Hosts" - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Beard. 

Christmas Sermon — Rev. John A. Morison, D. D. 

VioHn Solo — "Meditation" - - - - Bach-Gounod 

Mr. Krauss. 



168 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Oro-an Postlude — "And the Glory of the Lord" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Mrs. Amy Leech Northrup, 
Mrs. J. R. McGlashan and Mrs. W. P. Todd, sopranos; 
Mrs. Willard S. Bracken, Mrs. James C. Ames, Miss Mar- 
garet Blood and Miss Eleanor Switzer, altos; Mr. Adair 
Hickman, Mr. C. H. Ogden and Mr. R. J. Evans, tenors; 
Mr. William Beard, ]\Ir. Charles T. Atkinson and Mr. 
L. A. Denney, basses. 

The Orchestra: Mr. Alexander Krauss and ]\Ir. Richard Seidel 
(violins), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. Franz H. 
Esser and Mr. George Dasch (violas) , Mr. Alfred Quensel 
(flute) , Mr. Alfred Barthel (oboe and English horn) , Mr. 
Leopold de Mare (French horn) , Mr. Louis Klemm and 
Mr. Hans Parbs (double basses) , Mr. Joseph Zettelmann 
(kettle-drums) , Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp). Mr. Francis 
S. Moore (O.). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

December 31 — The Rev. William Rodman Notman, D. D., 
former Minister of the Fourth Presbyterian Church, 
Chicago, passed away at Bermuda. 

1909 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble and Mrs. Amy Leech North- 
rup, sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. Bracken and I\Irs. James 
C. Ames, altos; Mr. Howard D. Kellogg and Mr. C. H. 
Ogden, tenors; Mr. William Beard and Mr. Charles T. 
Atkinson, basses. Mr. Francis S. Moore, (O.) Mr. 
Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

January 6 — Wednesday. Funeral services of Mrs. Augustus 
N. Eddy, at 1910 Calumet avenue, conducted by Dr. 
Morison, assisted by Mrs. Lucille S. Tewksbury (S.), Mrs. 
Annie R. Thacker (A.) and Mr. H. A. Mix (T.), of the 
Second Presbyterian Choir, and Mr. William Beard (B.), 
of the First Presbyterian Choir. Mrs. Eddy, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. F. F. Spencer of Chicago, died in Wash- 
ington, D. C, January 2, 1909. 

January 31 — 

Prelude — "Pastorale in A" - - - - - Guilmant 

Harp and Organ. 
Anthem — "O Gladsome Light" - - - - SuUivan 
The Sermon — Rev. James G. K. McClure, Jr., of McCormick 

Seminary. Text: "But Seek ye first the Kingdom," 

etc. (St. Matt, vi- 33.) 

The preacher showed the heavy responsibility which the 
modern world, with its ease of communication, places upon 




FRANCIS SI1.\EV M<H)RH. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 1C9 

the individual members of the Church for the extension of 
the ideals and hopes of the Kingdom of God to all parts of 
the earth. 
February 7 — 

Prelude — "A Wedding Hymn" - - - - Rouher 

For English horn, viola, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Ring Out, Wild Bells" - - Gounod-Root 
Offertory — "Faith" - - - - - - Chadwick 

Mr. Beard, accompanied by oboe, viola, harp and organ. 

Solo for oboe — "Evening Hymn" - - - Schumann 

Mr. Barthel, accompanied by viola, harp and organ. 

February 14 — Abraham Lincoln Centenary. The worst bliz- 
zard Chicago has had in years; streets and walks covered 
with ice. 

Prelude — "Invocation" _____ Ganne 

Anthem — "A Mighty Fortress is our God" - Luther 

Violin Solo — "Ave Varum Corpus" _ - _ Mozart 

Mr. Krauss. 
Offertory — "Land of Hope and Glory" - - Elgar 

The Sermon — Subject: "The Life and Work of Abraham 

Lincoln" — Rev. John A. Morison, D. D. 
Anthem — "The American Hymn" _ _ _ Keller 

Organ Postlude — "The Star Spangled Banner" Buck 

Mr. Moore. 

The Choir was assisted at this service by Messrs. Krauss 
(violin), de Mare (French horn), Zettelmann (drums), 
and Tramonti (harp). 

March 21 — 

Prelude — "Meditation" _____ Dubois 

Duo for violin and French horn. 
Messrs. Krauss and de Mare, accompanied by harp and organ. 
Anthem — "The One Hundred and Twenty-first Psalm" 

----------- Otis 

Offertory — "In Dreams I've Heard the Seraphs Fair" Faure 

Mrs. Trimble, accompanied by violin, French horn, 

harp and organ. 

March 28— 

Prelude — "Romance" ----- Saint-Saens 

Oboe, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem for Lent — "Blessed Jesus, Fount of Mercy" 

---------- Dvorak 

Aria — "Our God, the Heavenly Circle Filling" Handel 

(From the scene at the Last Supper in the "Passion of 

Christ.-) 

Mrs. Trimble, accompanied by oboe, violoncello, 

harp and organ. 

Anthem — "There is a Green Hill Far Away" - Gounod 

Accompanied by EngUsh horn, violoncello, harp and organ 

Offertory — "It is Enough" (From "Elijah.") Mendelssohn 

Mr. Beard, accompanied by oboe, violoncello, harp and organ. 

The Sermon — Lenten address, Rev. John A. Morison, D. D. 



170 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Duo for oboe and violoncello — "Melodie" Charpentier 

Messrs. Barthel and Steindel. 

Organ Postlude — "And with His Stripes" - Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

April 4 — 

Prelude — "Adoration" ----- Fillipucci 

Oboe, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "It Shall Come to Pass" _ _ _ Tours 

The Sermon — The Fifth Anniversary of Dr. Morison's minis- 
try. 

April 11 — Easter Celebration: 

Prelude — "Easter Morning" _ - _ _ Grieg 

Anthem — "Happy and Blest are They" (From "St. Paul") 

--------- Mendelssohn 

Anthem— "I Shall not Die, but Live" - H. W. Parker 
Violoncello Solo — "Adagio Pathetique" - - Godard 

Mr. Steindel. 
Offertory — Recitative and aria, "With Verdure Clad" 

---------- Haydn 

Mrs. Trimble. 
Easter Sermon — Rev. John A. Morison, D. D. 
Violin Solo — "Largo" ------ Handel 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "The Hallelujah Chorus" - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Mabel J. ChamberHn 
(S.), Mrs. Frances C. Libbe (A.), Mr. R. J. Evans (T.), and 
Mr. Clark Learning (B.). The orchestra: Messrs. Alex- 
ander Krauss and Richard Seidel (violins) , Messrs. Franz 
H. Esser and George Dasch (violas) , Mr. Bruno Steindel 
(violoncello), Messrs. Louis Klemm and Hans Parbs 
(double basses) , Mr. Alfred Quensel (flute) , Mr. Alfred 
Barthel (oboe and English horn), Mr. Leopold de Mare 
(French horn), Mr. Joseph Zettelmann (kettle-drums). 
Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

"Had our large Church been even much larger, it would 
have been taxed to its utmost capacity to accommodate the 
worshippers upon this Easter service. Never before had a 
greater reverence and devotional spirit been manifest on 
Easter Day. The Congregation was in full sympathy with 
the Easter spirit and what the Day means to mankind as 
portrayed in the words of ouf Minister." 

April 12 — Monday, 2 P. M. Funeral services of Mrs. Charles 
D. Hamill, in the Church, conducted by Dr. Morison. 
Mr. William Beard sang a few familiar hymns. Mrs. 
Hamill, an old member of the First Church, was deeply 



PULPIT AXD CHOIR. 171 

interested in all its mission and hospital work. Her 
death occurred April 10. 

May 23— Calvin Quarto-Centenary (1509-15G4.) 

Prelude — "Allegro Moderato" - - - Stradella 

Violoncello solo, Mr. Paul Schoessling. 
Anthem — "Lord! Thou Alone Art God" - Mendelssohn 
Huguenot Hymn — "Navarre" - - Claude Goudemil 
Chorale — "A Mighty Fortress is our God" - Luther 

_ t, Ti ^ *. * I "Commandments" Claude Goudemil 
French Protestant .qj^ ^.,^^^„ _ Traditional (1553) 
Hymns— y ..g^. Michael" - Traditional (1553) 

Offertory — "List! The Cherubic Host" - - Gaul 

The Sermon — Text: "If there be a messenger with him, an 
interpreter, one among a thousand, to shew unto man 
his uprightness" (Job xxxiii: 23). Rev. John A. Mori- 
son, D. D. 
Prayer — Offered after the sermon in the French Church at 

Geneva. 
Violoncello Solo— "Adagio" _ _ _ - Corelli 

Mr. Paul SchoessUng. 
Organ Postlude — Fugue and Variations on the Chorale — 
"Wir Glauben All' An Einen Gott" - - Rinck 

Mr. Moore. 

John Calvin was an acute thelogian and an able states- 
man, but had little of the genius of song. 

Martin Luther, a musician, as well as priest, stirred the 
hearts of all Germany with his rich psalmody. 

And yet, strange to say, it is to Calvin that we owe the 
introduction of metrical psalmody into the Reformed Churches 
of France. In the early part of the 16th Century, two French 
poets, Marot and Beza, set the Psalms to verse. The effect 
on the French people was magical. Marot's Psalms became 
the rage of the day. All classes sang them to their popular 
ballad tunes, Calvin, seeing their religious value, engaged 
musicians to set these verses to music. Guillaume Franc, 
one of the best composers of that day, wrote a melody for 
the 13-4th Psalm, now well known as "Old Hundred." 

The tune "Navarre" well illustrates the style of the 
melodies of the French Reformation. Claude Goudemil, its 
author, was one of the men selected by Calvin to compile the 
Genevan Psalter, and was one of "the noble army of martyrs." 
Goudemil, born in 1505, near Avagnon, went to Rome to study, 
where he founded a school of music and had several illustri- 
ous pupils, among them, Palestrina. On his return to France, 
Goudemil became a music director at Lyons, where he re- 



172 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

nounced Romanism for Protestantism. On "Black Bar- 
tholomew's Day," August 24, 1572, he was brutally massa- 
cred for his Huguenot tunes. Goudemil was a holy man and 
one of the first musicians in France. 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Mrs. Amy Leech Northrup 
and ]\Iiss Mabel J. Chamberlin, sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. 
Bracken, Mrs. James C. Ames and Miss Charlotte EUick- 
sen, altos; Mr. Howard D. Kellogg and Mr. C. H. Ogden, 
tenors; Mr. G. W. Christopher and Mr. Charles T. Atkin- 
son, basses; Mr. Paul Schoessling (violoncello); Mr. Francis 
S. Moore (O.) ; Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 
June 3 — Thursday evening. Installation service of the Rev. 
John Timothy Stone, D. D., as Minister of the Fourth 
Presbyterian Church. The Rev. Louis P. Cain, D. D., 
Moderator of the Presbytery, the Rev. John Balcom 
Shaw, D. D., Second Presbyterian Church, the Rev. 
Edgar P.^Hill, D. D., Secretary of the Church Extension 
Committee, the Rev. John Newton Freeman, D. D., As- 
sistant Minister, Fourth Presbyterian Church, the Rev. 
Charles Wood, D. D., of the Church of the Covenant, 
Washington, D. C, and the Rev. J. G. K. McClure, D. D., 
McCormick Theological Seminary, took part in the serv- 
ices. 
June 6 — Mr. Frank A. Preisch (B.) in place of Mr. William 
Beard, ^ resigned. 

Prelude — "The Question" - - - Wolstenholme 

Anthem — "Praise Waiteth for Thee, O God" - Foster 

Offertory — "By the Waters of Babylon" - - Howell 

■ Mr. Preisch. 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text: "My soul thirsteth for the 
living God." (Psalm xlii: 2.) 

June 13 — Children's Day: 

Prelude — "Andantino" _____ Franck 

Anthem — "Ye Shall Dwell in the Land" - - Stainer 

Offertory — "I Bring Thee a Broken Heart" - Wood 

Mrs. Trimble. 
The Sermon — "The Message of the Flowers" — Rev. John A 

Morison, D. D. 
Postlude — "The Star Spangled Banner" - - Buck 

Miss Mary Porter Pratt (O.), in the absence of Mr. Moore. 

June 27— 

Prelude — "Andante in D" - - - - - Silas 

Anthem — "Praise the Lord" _ _ _ _ Burdett 
Response — "I Will Never Leave Thee" - - Otis 

' Mr. William Beard, came to Chicago in 1902; soloist in concerts of the Theo- 
dore Thomas Orchestra and Mendelssohn Club; has been associated with the Cosmo- 
politan School of Music and Chicago Conservatory. Mr. Beard is (September, 1913) 
with the Walter Spry School of Music. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 173 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text: "He saith unto them, but 
whom say ye that I am?" (St. Matt, xvi: 15.) 

Preaching services were continued in the main audience 
room until August 1, when the Minister and his family went 
away for their summer vacation. During the month of Aug- 
ust, services were held in the lecture room. The pulpit was 
supplied as follows: August 1, the Rev. Clarence G. Reynolds, 
D. D., Asheville, N. C; August 8, Dr. J. F. Horton, Chicago; 
August 15 and 22, Prof. Nathaniel Butler, University of 
Chicago; August 29, and through September, Prof. W. A. 
Ganfield of Carroll College. 

In the absence of the regular Choir, during vacation, the 
music at the Sunday services was led by Mrs. Ada M. Shef- 
field (S.). Mr. Morton H. Eddy (O.). 

October 3— Mr. David D. Duggan (T.), in place of Mr. H. D. 
Kellogg, resigned. Mr. Ellis P. Legler (B.), in place of 
Mr. Frank A. Preisch, resigned. 

Anthem — "While the Earth Remaineth" - John A. West 

Offertory — "If With all Your Hearts" - Mendelssohn 

(From "Elijah.") 

Mr. Duggan. 

Dr. Morison back from his vacation and spoke from the text, 
"For there is none other name under Heaven given 
among men, whereby we must be saved." (Acts iv: 
12.) 

October 17 — 

Prelude— "Holy Night" ------ Buck 

Duet— "The Lord is my Light" ----- Buck 

Mrs. Bracken and Mr. Legler. 
Postlude — "Triumphal March" ----- Buck 

Mr. Moore. 

Annual collection for Railroad Mission. 

Dr. Morison's subject, "Sunday-school Work." Text, "Suffer 
the little children to come unto Me." (St. Mark x: 14.) 

October 24 — 

Anthem- "Teach me, O Lord" - - - - Burdett 

Offertory— "In Thee I put my Steadfast Trust" 

-------- Blumenschein 

Mr. Legler. 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text, "And as many as touched 
Him were made whole," (St. Mark vi: 5G). The Min- 
ister made two suggestions in his sermon; (1) the works 
Christ did were wonderful; (2) His life was more wonder- 
ful than His works. 



174 PULPIT ARD CHOIR. 

The Special Musical Services began November 7, similar 
in character to those of last year, to continue until Easter, 
1910. 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Mrs. Amy L. Northrup, 
sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. Bracken, Mrs. James C. Ames, 
altos; Mr. David D. Duggan, Mr. C. H. Ogden, tenors; 
Mr. Ellis P. Legler and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, basses. 
Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp), assisted by violin, violon- 
cello or other instruments. 

November 14 — 

Prelude — "Harp Aria" (From the Oratorio, "Esther") 

---------- Handel 

Violin solo, accompanied by harp and organ. 
Anthem— "Unto Thee, O God" - - - John E. West 
Anthem — "There is no Sorrow" - - - - Godfrey- 
Accompanied by violin, harp and organ. 
Offertory — "The City Beautiful" _ _ _ Federlein 

Mr. Duggan, accompanied by violin, harp and organ. 
The Sermon — Subject: "Our Heavenly Home" — Rev. John 

A. Morison, D. D. 
Violin solo — "Romance in F" - - - - Bruneau 

Mr. Krauss. 
Postlude — "March in C" _____ Bossi 

Mr. Moore. 

December 5 — The regular Choir of eight voices, assisted by 
Miss Mabel J. ChamberHn (S.) and Miss Charlotte Ellick- 
sen (A.); Messrs. Krauss (violin), Esser (viola), de Mare 
(French horn), and Tramonti (harp). 

Prelude — "Cantilene" ------ Dubois 

Violin, viola, French horn, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Brightest and Best" - - - H. W. Parker 
Anthem — "Selections form "Elijah." Recit. "See now, he 
Sleepeth"; Trio, "Lift Thine Eyes"; Chorus, "He 
Watching over Israel" - - _ - Mendelssohn 
Offertory— "King, All Glorious" - _ _ _ Barnby 
Solo for horn — "Romance" _ _ _ Saint-Saens 

Mr. de Mare. 

Organ Postlude — "Festival March" - - Claussman 

Mr. Moore. 

In the evening at eight o'clock, a meeting in the interest of 
the Anti-saloon League was held in our Church. Mr. 
Moore gave a preliminary organ recital, commencing at 
7:15. Selections were sung by the Choir and an address 
was given by the Rev. James Alexander Patterson, D. D., 
of New York City. 

December 12 — The Choir was assisted by Messrs. Krauss 
(violin), Esser (viola), Steindel (violoncello) and Tra- 
monti (harp). 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 175 

Prelude — "Berceuse" ------ Jarnefelt 

Violin, viola, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "I Waited Patiently for the Lord" - Tours 

OfFertory — "O Lord Most Holy" - _ - Schubert 

Viola Solo — "Morning Hymn" - - Richard Strauss 

Mr. Esser. 
Violin Solo — "Evening Hymn" - - - Schumann 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "Marche du Synode" - Saint-Seans 

Mr. Moore. 

December 16 — Thursday evening. The second banquet of 
the Presbyterian Social Union, held in the parlors of this 
Church. Dr. Edgar P. Hill, chairman, introduced the 
new President of the Union, the Rev. John S. NoUen, 
Ph. D. Invocation was offered by the Rev. John A. Mori- 
son, D. D. At the conclusion of the banquet, a paper 
was read by Mr. Philo Adams Otis on "The Church and 
Choir of Yesterday, with Thoughts on the Choir of To- 
day and Tomorrow." After the reading of the paper, 
the audience adjourned to the auditorium above, to hear 
a musical service given by the First Church Choir (ten 
voices), assisted by Messrs. Krauss (violin), Esser (viola), 
Quensel (flute), Barthel (oboe and English horn), de 
Mare (French horn), Tramonti (harp), and Zettelmann 
(drums). The purpose of this service was to show how 
these instruments can be employed in Church with the 
best results. 
Solo for oboe — "An Easter Meditation" - Carolus-Duran 

Mr. Barthel. 
Chorale — "A Mighty Fortress is our God" - Luther 

Accompanied by orchestra and organ. 
Harp Solo — "Monastery" - _ - - Hasselmans 

Mr. Tramonti. 
Soprano Solo — "In Dreams I've Heard the Seraphs" Faure 
Mrs. Trimble, accompanied by violin, harp, French horn and 

organ. 
Anthem — "O for the Wings of a Dove" - Mendelssohn 
For women's voices, accompanied by fiute, French horn, harp 

and organ. 
Trio — "Cantilene" ------- Dubois 

Violin, viola and French horn, accompanied by harp and 

organ. 
Anthem — "List! The Cherubic Host" - - Gaul 

For women's voices, accompanied by English horn, viola, 

harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Rise, Crowned with Light" - - Otis 

Benediction— Rev. T. D. Wallace, D. D. 
Organ Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

December 26 — Christmas Celebration : 

Cantata — "Wondrous Words of Love" - _ - Otis 

Violoncello Solo — "Romance" - - - - Boellmann 

Mr. Steindel. 



176 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

The Sermon — Rev. John A. Morison, D. D. 

Violin Solo — "Meditation" - - - - Bach-Gounod 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "And the Glory of the Lord" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Mrs. Amy Leech North- 
rup, Mrs. C. A. Fieldcamp and Miss Mabel J. Chamberlin, 
sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. Bracken, Mrs. James C. Ames, 
Mrs. lone Sutherland and Miss Charlotte EUicksen, altos; 
Mr. D. D. Duggan, Mr. C. H. Ogden and Mr. Curtis 
WiUiams, tenors; Mr. Ellis P. Legler, Mr. Frank A. 
Preisch and Mr. Clark Leaming, basses. 

The orchestra: Mr. Alexander Krauss, and Mr. Richard Sei- 
del (violins), Mr. Franz H. Esser and Mr. George Dasch 
(violas), Mr. Louis Klemm and Mr. Hans Parbs (double 
basses), Mr. Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Alfred Barthel 
(oboe and English horn) , Mr. Leopold de Mare (French 
horn), Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp) , Mr. Joseph Zettelmann 
(kettle-drums). Mr. Francis S. Moore, (O.). Mr. Philo 
Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

1910 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Mrs. Amy Leech Northrup 
and Miss Mabel J. Chamberlin, sopranos; Mrs. Willard 
S. Bracken, Mrs. lone Sullivan and Miss Charlotte EUick- 
sen,^ altos; Mr. D. D. Duggan and Mr. C. H. Ogden, tenors; 
Mr. Ellis P. Legler and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, basses. 
Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp), Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 
Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

January 23 — Mrs. lone Sullivan sang today in the absence 
of Mrs. James C. Ames (A.), and Mr. Curtis Williams, in 
the absence of Mr. D. D. Duggan (T.). 

January 30 — 

Prelude — "Autumn Song" - - - Tschaikowsky 

Oboe, viola, harp and organ. 
Chorale — "Break Forth, O Beauteous Heavenly Light" 

---------- Bach 

Christmas Carol — "The Angels and the Shepherds" Riedel 

(Old Bohemian) 
Soprano Solo — "A Light from Heaven" - - Gounod 
Mrs. Trimble, accompanied by oboe, viola, harp and organ. 

February 6 — 

Prelude — "A Wedding Hymn" - - - - Rouher 

For Enghsh horn, viola, harp and organ. 
Anthem— "With all Thy Hosts" - - John E. West 



» Miss Charlotte EUicksen, after%vard Mrs. James W. McCuUoh. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 177 

Offertory — "Let not your Heart be troubled" Ward 

Mr. Duggan, accompanied by oboe, viola, harp and 

organ. 

Duo for viola and English horn — "Elegie" Boisdeffre 

Messrs. Esser and Barthel, accompanied by harp and 

organ. 

February 27 — 

Prelude — "Ave Verum Corpus" - - - - Mozart 

Violin, French horn, harp and organ. 

Anthem — "One Hundred and Twenty-first Psalm" Otis 

Duo for violin and French horn — "Berceuse" - Thome 

Messrs. Krauss and de Mare, accompanied by harp 

and organ. 

March 8 — The regular meeting of the Fort Dearborn Guild, 
was held in the Church parlors. Convener, Mrs. Philo 
Adams Otis. Paper by Miss Elizabeth Risser; subject, 
"A Winter in Rome." 

March 13 — 

Offertory— "O Lamb of God" ("Agnus Dei") - - Bach 

(From the Mass in B Minor) 

Mrs. Bracken, accompanied by oboe, violoncello, harp 

and organ. 

Anthem — "List! The Cherubic Host" _ _ _ Gaul 

For women's voices, accompanied by English horn, 

violoncello, harp and organ. 

Mr. Walfried Singer (harp) in the absence of Mr. Tramonti. 

Christ Reformed Episcopal Church celebrated this morning, 
the fiftieth year of the Rectorship of Bishop Charles 
Edward Cheney, D. D., S. T. D. 

March 27 — Easter Celebration : 

Prelude — "Easter Morning" _ _ _ _ Grieg 

Anthem — "Open to me the Gates of Righteousness" 

---------- Manney 

Aria — "If God be for us. Who can be Against us" Handel 
(From "The Messiah.") 
Mr. Duggan. 
Anthem — "Happy and Blest" (From "St. Paul.") 

--------- Mendelssohn 

Anthem — "The Glories of the Messiah" - - Otis 

Violoncello Solo — "Romance" - - - Boellmann 

Mr. Steindel. 

Offertory — "I Know that my Redeemer Liveth" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mrs. Trimble. 

The Sermon — Rev. John A. Morison, D. D. 

Violin Solo — "Largo" ------ Handel 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "The Hallelujah Chorus" - Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

The regular Choir was assisted by Mrs. C. A. Fieldcamp (S.), 
Mrs. lone Sutherland (A.), Mr. Albert H. Hancock (T.) 
and Mr. Clark Learning (B.), (14 voices in all). 



178 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

The orchestra: Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Richard Sei- 
del (violins) , Mr. Franz H. Esser and Mr. George Dasch 
(violas) , Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello) , Mr. Louis 
Klemm and Mr. Hans Parbs (double basses) , Mr. Alfred 
Quensel (flute), Mr. Alfred Barthel (oboe and English 
horn) , Mr. Leopold de Mare (French horn) , Mr. Enrico 
ramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph Zettelmann (kettle-drums). 

April 10— The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Mrs. Amy 
Leech Northrup, sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. Bracken, Mrs. 
James C. Ames, altos; Mr. Albert H. Hancock (T.), in 
the absence of Mr. Duggan, and Mr. Ellis P. Legler (B.). 
Prelude — "In Paradise" _____ Dubois 

Mr. Moore. 

Anthem — "Ye Shall go out With Joy" - - Barnby 

Anthem — "Chorus of Seraphim" _ _ _ Dubois 

For women's voices. 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text, "I am debtor both to the 
Greeks and to the Barbarians." (Romans i: 14.) 

April 17 — 

Prelude — "Pastorale in E" - - - - - Lemare 

Anthem — "If a Man Die, Shall he Live Again" 

--------- Macpherson 

Anthem — "Far From the World" - - H. W\ Parker 
The Sermon— Rev. Martin D. Hardin, D. D., Third Presby- 
terian Church, Chicago. Text: "Everyone that exalt- 
eth himself shall be abased." (St. Luke xviii: 14.) 

May 8— 

Prelude — "Prelude in G Minor" _ _ _ Piern6 

Anthem— "Jubilate in E" - - - - H. W. Parker 
Offertory — "Jerusalem! Thou that Killest the Prophets" 
(From "St. Paul.") _ _ _ _ Mendelssohn 
Mrs. Trimble. 
Anthem — "Tarry with Me" - - _ _ - Baldwin 

The Minister's subject was "The Victory of the Redeemed." 
Text, "And they sing the song of Moses, the servant of 
God, and the song of the Lamb." (Rev. xv: 3.) 

May 22— 

Offertory — "If with All Your Hearts" - Mendelssohn 

(From "Elijah.") 

Mr. Wallace Moody. 

May 31 — Funeral services of Mr. William E. Kelley, at his 
summer home, Lindenmere, Oconomowoc, Wis., con- 
ducted by Dr. Morison. Familiar hymns were sung by 
Mr. Ben Q. Tufts. Mr. Kelley had been a member of 
the Board of Trustees of the Church since December 5, 
1892, and Treasurer since June 3, 1896. Mr. Kelley was 
born in Chicago, August 27, 1850; died at Oconomowoc, 
May 27, 1910. 




I'IRST PRKSUVTERIAX CIUKCH. 
Indiana A\i-nuf and T\Min\ lir-t Strict (1913). 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 179 

June 12 — Children's Day. 

Anthem — "The Recessional" _ - _ Schnecker 

Offertory— "I Think When I Read that Sweet Story of Old" 

----------J. A. West 

Mr. BorrofT. 
The Sermon — "The Christian Soldier" — Rev. John A. Mori- 
son, D. D. 

June 19 — 

Anthem — "Great is our Lord" _ _ - _ Foster 

Offertory — "The Sorrows of Death" - - Mendelssohn 

Mr. Duggan. 

The Sermon — Text: "In the multitude of my thoughts" 

(Psalm xciv: 19.) — Rev. John A. Morison, D. D. 

June 22 — Wednesday. At a meeting of the Church and So- 
ciety, held this evening, the resignation of the Rev. 
John Archibald Morison, D. D., Minister of this Church, 
was read and accepted. Resolutions were passed, ex- 
pressive of the affectionate regard in which Dr. Morison 
was held by the Session, the Board of Deacons, and by 
the other bodies in the organization of our Church, and 
in acknowledgment of his exceptional ability as a theo- 
logian and preacher. 

June 26— 

Organ Prelude — "Air in D" _____ Bach 

Anthem — "In Heavenly Love Abiding" - - Burdett 

Dr. Morison spoke from the text, "Who in the days of his 
flesh," etc. (Hebrews v: 7.) 

July 3 — The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Mabel J. 
Chamberlin and Miss Eleanor Switzer (S.), Mrs. lone 
Sutherland and Miss Hazel Heimbeck (A.), Mr. C. H. 
Ogden (T.), Mr. Charles T. Atkinson (B.), Mr. Paul 
Schoessling (violoncello). 
Prelude— "Canto Popolare" _ _ _ _ Elgar 

Violoncello solo, Mr. Schoessling. 
Anthem — "King, all Glorious" - _ - - Barnby 
Offertory — "O Jesus, Thou Art Standing" - Foster 

Violoncello Solo — "Adagio" _ _ _ - Corelli 

Mr. Schoesshng. 

Organ Postlude — "Marche Pontificale" - - Lemmens 

Mr. Moore. 

Dr. Morison's last Sunday as the Minister of our Church. 
He spoke from the text, "We have an altar, whereof they 
have no right to eat which serve the tabernacle," (Hebrews 
xiii: 10). The whole Congregation remained at the conclu- 
sion of the service to say a word of farewell to their Minister. 
For over six years, Dr. ^Morison has been the beloved Minister 
of this Church and today takes leave of us in accordance with 



ISO PULPIT A^W CHOIR. 

his letter of resignation of June 11. During all this period 
he has labored with the utmost zeal for the advancement of 
the work of the Church, and has devoted himself faithfully 
and conscientiously to its interests. We feel assured of his 
continued love and prayers, and he may rest in full confidence 
of the continued love and prayers of his people. 

From July 10, until September 4, Miss May D. Laukart 
was organist in the absence of Mr. Moore. During the month 
of August, in the absence of the regular Choir, Miss Martha 
Jones (S.), led the singing. The pulpit was supplied during 
the summer, as follows: 

July 10 — Prof. Benjamin S. Terry, of the University of Chi- 
cago. 

July 17— The Rev. Jesse W. Brooks, D. D. 

July 24 and 31— Rev. Prof. Nathaniel Butler. 

August 7 and 14— Rev. Prof. W. A. Ganfield. 

August 21 and 28— The Rev. A. B. Marshall, D. D. 

September 4 — The regular Choir resumed its work for the 
winter months. 

Prelude — "Romance Sans Paroles" - - - Guilmant 

Mr. Moore. 
Anthem — "Send Out Thy Light" _ _ _ Manney 
Sermon — Rev. James Frothingham, D. D. 

The pulpit was occupied September 11, 18, 25 and October 
2, by the Rev. John Newton Freeman, D. D. 

October 4 — Tuesday P. M., funeral services of Mrs. Joseph 
Edward Otis at her residence, 1730 Prairie avenue, con- 
ducted by the Rev. John Balcom Shaw, D. D., of the 
Second Presby terian Church, assisted by the Choir of the 
First Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Maria Taylor Otis was 
a daughter of Hon. Sebastian Frederick Taylor and Judith 
Kellogg Taylor. Mrs. Otis was born at Conneaut, Ohio, 
August 30, 1836; married to Joseph Edward Otis, May 3, 
1859, in Milan, Ohio; came to Chicago with her husband 
in 1860. She was received into the membership of the 
First Church, October 5, 1866. 



PULPIT AXD CHOIR. igl 



Dubois 



October 1G — 

Prelude— "Chant Pastorale" - _ _ . ^^,^^^ 

Offertory — "My Hope is in the Everlasting" - Stain 

Mr. Duggan. 
Sermon by Dr. Freeman, now Minister in Charge. 

November 1— Tuesday, 10:00 A. M. Funeral services of 
Mr. Frank E. May (died October 30), conducted by 
the Rev. William C. Covert, D. D., of the Forty-first 
Street Presbyterian Church, and the Rev. Frank W. Gun- 
saulus, D. D., of the Central Church. Mr. May was a 
member of the Men's League, and took a great interest 
in all the activities of the Church. 

November 13— The Special Musical Services resumed for the 
winter months; Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Miss Mabel J. 
Chamberlin and Miss Margaret Stevenson, sopranos; Mrs. 
Willard S. Bracken, Mrs James C. Ames and Mrs. F. F. 
Bradley, altos; Mr. John B. Miller (Mr. Duggan resigned) 
and Mr. C. H. Ogden, tenors; Mr. Marion Green and Mr. 
Charles T. Atkinson, basses. Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 
Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

Prelude — "Adoration and Communion" - Saint-Saens 

Harp and organ. 
Anthem— "O Come, Let us Worship" - Mendelssohn 
Anthem— "I Praise Thee, O Lord" - - Mendelssohn 
(From "St. Paul.") 
Accompanied by harp and organ. 
Offertory— "If With all Your Hearts" - Mendelssohn 
(From "Elijah.") 
Mr. Miller. 
Accompanied by harp and organ. 
The Sermon— Rev. John Newton Freeman, D. D. Text: 
"That which we have seen and heard, declare we unto 
you that ye also may have fellowship with us. (I John 
):3.) Subject: "Fellowship." 
Harp Solo— "A Sacred Song" - _ _ _ Gounod 

Mr. Tramonti. 

Organ Postlude— "Grand Chorus in B Flat" - Dubois 

Mr. Moore. 

November 20 — 

Prelude— "Harp Aria" (From "Esther.") - Handel 

VioHn, harp and organ. 
Anthem— "Unto Thee, O God, do we Give Thanks" 

,.. ,• ~c i~ , 7, ,.~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ J- E. West 

\iolin Solo— "Meditation" - - - _ Glazounow 

Mr. Krauss, accompanied by harp and organ 

°^\^,^°^>;-t"0 Lord, Most Holy" - - Cherubini 

Mrs. Irimble, accompanied by violin, harp and organ. 



182 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

November 27 — 

Prelude — "Benedictus" _____ Qtis 

Violin, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Brightest and Best" _ - - - Manney 
Duo for violin and violoncello — "Berceuse" Jarnefelt 

Messrs. Alexander Krauss and Carl Brueckner, accom- 
panied by harp and organ. 
Offertory — "O Lord Most Holy" _ _ _ Franck 

Mrs. Bracken, accompanied by violin, violoncello, 
harp and organ. 

December 5 — Monday, 3:00 P. M. In the Chapel of Grace- 
land Cemetery, funeral services of Mrs. Harriette L. 
Humphrey, widow of the Rev. Z. M. Humphrey, D. D., 
fourth Minister of the First Church, conducted by the 
Rev. J. G. K. McClure, D. D. After the death of Dr. Hum- 
phrey, November 13, 1881, Mrs. Humphrey resided for 
some years in Lake Forest. While there she prepared a 
series of Bible lectures which she delivered successfully 
several winters in Chicago, Philadelphia, New York and 
other cities. Her life was devoted to promoting religious 
and missionary enterprises. Mrs. Humphrey died at her 
home in New Haven, Conn., December 2. 

December 11 — The Choir was assisted by Messrs. Quensel 
(flute), de Mare (horn) and Tramonti (harp). 

Anthem — "Sing a Song of Praise" - - - J. E. West 

Offertory — "The Lord is My Light" - _ - Allitsen 

Mr. Green, accompanied by flute, horn harp and 

organ. 

December 16 — Friday P. M. The funeral services of Mr. 
Moses D. Wells (died December 14), were held at his 
late residence, 2550 Michigan avenue, conducted by 
the Rev. J. G. K. McClure, D. D. Mr. Wells was one of 
the oldest members of the Congregation of the First 
Church, and had been a regular attendant at its services 
during his residence in Chicago. He was born in Otis, 
Mass., August 9, 1837; came to Chicago in 1852, and was 
engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes. His 
factory was the first of its kind in the West. He was 
married in 1866 to Miss Frances Searles, of Buffalo, N. Y., 
whose death occurred in 1873. Their daughters, Mrs. 
Charles T. Atkinson and Mrs. Howard Van Doren Shaw, 
now reside in Chicago. In 1883 Mr. Wells married Mrs. 
Frank Daggett, daughter of the late Mr. Nathan Corwith, 
of Chicago. 

December 18— The Rev. Wilson AuU, preacher, in the ab- 
sence of Dr. Freeman. Text, "If a man die, shall he live 
again." (Job xiv: 14.) 




MRS Z M HIMPHRKV 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 183 

The Choir was assisted by Messrs. Barthel (oboe and English 
horn), Brueckner (violoncello) and Tramonti (harp). 

Prelude — "Cantilene" ------ Boiscleffre 

Oboe, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Brightest and Best" - - - - Manney 

Duo for oboe and violoncello — "A Russian Folk Song" 

---------- Glinka 

Messrs. Barthel and Brueckner, accompanied by 
harp and organ. 

December 25 — Christmas Celebration: 

Cantata — "Wondrous Words of Love" - - - Otis 

For solo voices, chorus, orchestra and organ. 
Violoncello Solo — "Meditation" - - - Boisdeffre 

Mr. Steindel. 
The Sermon — Rev. James G. K. McClure, D. D., in the ab- 
sence of Dr. Freeman. 
Violin Solo — "Meditation R.eligieuse" - - Massenet 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "And the Glory of the Lord" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

The regular Choir was assisted by Miss Mabel J. Chamberlin, 
Miss Margaret Stevenson and i\Irs. Katherine ]\I. Swee- 
ney, sopranos; Mrs. James C. Ames, Mrs. lone Sutherland 
and Mrs. F. F. Bradley, altos; Mr. C. H. Ogden and Mr. 
Vernon Smith, tenors; Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, Mr. 
Frank A. Preisch and Mr. Ralph B. Throop, basses. 

The orchestra: Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Richard Seidel 
(violins), Mr. Franz H. Esser and Mr. George Dasch 
(violas), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), Mr. Louis 
Klemm and Mr. Hans Parbs (double basses) , Mr. Alfred 
Quensel (flute) , Mr. Alfred Barthel (oboe and English 
horn), ]\Ir. Leopold de Mare (French horn), Mr. Enrico 
Tramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph Zettelmann (kettle-drums). 
Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 



1911 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Miss Mabel J. ChamberUn 
and Miss Margaret Stevenson, sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. 
Bracken and Miss Margaret Giles, altos; Mr. John B. 
Miller and Mr. C. H. Ogden, tenors; Mr. Marion Green 
and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, basses. Mr. Francis S. 
Moore (O.). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

The Special Musical Services will continue until Easter Day, 
the Choir being assisted by Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp) 
and other instrumental players. 



184 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

January 1 — 

Prelude — "Paul, on the Way to Damascus" - Mailing 

Harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Ring out, Wild Bells" - - - Gounod 
The Sermon— By the Rev. Edgar P. Hill, D. D., in the ab- 
sence of Dr. Freeman. 

January 8— Mr. Frank A. Preisch (B.), Mr. Marion Green^ 
having resigned. 

Anthem — "There Were Shepherds" - - - Foster 

Offertory — "Nazareth" _ _ - _ - Gounod 

Mr. Preisch, accompanied by harp and organ. 
The Sermon — Subject: "Brotherhood" — Rev. John N. Free- 
man, D. D. 

January 10 — Tuesday, 10:30 A. M. Regular meeting of the 
Fort Dearborn Guild. Paper, "A Winter in Spain," was 
read by Mrs. William C. Free, with stereopticon views. 
Convener, Mrs. William G. Sage. 

January 22 — 

Prelude — "Cavatine" ------- Raff 

Harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Calm on the List'ning Ear of Night" - Otis 
Offertory— "Christmas Bells" - _ - _ Liddle 

Mrs. Bracken, accompanied by harp and organ. 
Harp Solo — "Elegie" ----- Tramonti 

Mr. Tramonti. 

Dr. Freeman's subject was, "Opportunity." Text, "And who 
knoweth whether thou art come to the Kingdom for such 
a time as this?" (Esther iv: 14). The book of Esther, 
though an honest, correct piece of Persian history, is re- 
garded by some modern critics as legendary, with myth- 
ological tendencies and not to be included among the 
inspired writers. In every great crisis in human history, 
some one is ready for the emergency. "This is the op- 
portunity," and it comes to men but once in a lifetime. 

February 5 — Mr. O. Gordon Erickson (B.) in place of Mr. 
Preisch,^ resigned, 

1 Mr. Marion Green, sang in the Choir of the First Church at various times (1907- 
1910); resigned January 1.1911. and is now (1913) with the First M. E. Church of Evans- 
ton. Illinois. He organized the Sunday Evening Choral Club (Orchestra Hall), and 
was its director (1907-1911). 

' Mr. Frank A. Preisch (B.), began his professional career in a Church Choir in 
Buffalo, N. Y. He spent four years in France, singing in opera in Paris and Tou- 
louse, later going to England for eight years, including four seasons at the Covent 
Garden Opera in London. On his return to America, he was engaged for the Metro- 
politan Opera of N. Y. City. In May, 1913. he had a leading part in the Pageant, 
"Darkness and Light," at the Auditorium, Chicago. 




M A R 1 1 > X I ; R li h X 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 185 

Prelude — "Andante Religiose" - - - - Thome 

Anthem — "God so Loved the World" - Harold Moore 

Offertory — "Teach me, O Lord" _ _ _ Manney 

Mrs. Trimble, accompanied by violoncello, harp and 

organ. 

Violoncello Solo — "Invocation" - - - - Van Goens 

Mr. Hans Hess. 

February 12 — Abraham Lincoln Memorial service. 

The Choir was assisted by Messrs. Krauss (violin), de Mare 
(horn), Zettelmann (kettle-drums) and Tramonti (harp). 
Prelude — "Ave Verum Corpus" - - - - Mozart 

Violin, horn, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "A Mighty Fortress is our God" - Luther 

Anthem — "Souls of the Righteous" - T. Tertius Noble 

Accompanied by organ and kettle-drums. 
Offertory — "Land of Hope and Glory" - - Elgar 

Dr. Freeman spoke on "Lincoln the Anointed." Text, 
"Thus saith the Lord to His anointed, to Cyrus, whose 
right hand I have holden." (Isaiah xlv: 1.) 

All that the Lord said to King Cyrus could be said of Abra- 
ham Lincoln. Emerson said, Lincoln is the true history 
of America, because he stood for principles that were 
more than racial, more than national. Moses had forty 
years of work before he fulfilled his destiny. Lincoln 
finished his work in six years. 

March 12 — 

Prelude — "Berceuse" ------ Godard 

Violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Say, Watchman, What of the Night" Sullivan 
The Sermon — Theme, "With Christ at Home." Rev. John 

Newton Freeman, D. D. 
Tenor Solo — "Be thou Faithful Unto Death" Mendelssohn 
(From "St. Paul.") 
Mr. Miller, with violoncello obligato by Mr. Hess. 

For the successive Wednesday evening services until Easter, 
Dr. Freeman will lead in the study of Christ's Words 
from the Cross. Last Wednesday evening, March 9, 
the topic was, "Father forgive them" (St. Luke xxiii : 34). 
March 15, "Today shalt thou be with Me in Paradise" (St. 
Luke xxiii: 43). March 22, "Woman, behold thy son" 
(St. John xix: 25-27). March 29, "My God, why hast 
thou forsaken Me" (St. Mark xv: 33-36). April 5, "I 
thirst" (St. John xix: 28-29). April 12, "The Heart of' 
the Master" (St. Matt. xxvi:l-13). 

March 26 — 

Prelude — "A Russian Hymn" _ _ - _ Glinka 

For flute, viola, harp and organ. 
Anthem for Lent — "Turn Ye Even Unto Me" Godfrey 



1S6 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Anthem — "Lovely Appear" _ _ _ _ Gounod 

Offertory — "The Lord is My Shepherd" - - Schubert 

For women's voices, accompanied by viola, flute, harp 

and organ. 

The Sermon — Subject, "Personal Power." Text, "Behold, 

I will send you Elijah." (Malachi iv: 5.) Rev. John 

N. Freeman, D. D. 

Duo for viola and flute — "Confidence" - Hasselmans 

Messrs. Esser and Quensel. 

April 2 — 

The Choir was assisted by Messrs. Steindel (violoncello), 
Barthel (oboe) and Traraonti (harp). 
Prelude — "A Song of the Autumn" - Tschaikowsky 

Anthem for Lent — "O Lamb of God" - - Gounod 

Passion Music. 

Aria — "Our God, the Heavenly Circle Filling" Handel 

Mrs. Trimble, accompanied by oboe, violoncello, harp 

and organ. 

Chorale— "I Will Stay Here Beside Thee" - - Bach 

Offertory — "O Lamb of God" _____ Bach 

(From "The Mass in B Minor.") 

Mrs. Bracken, accompanied by oboe, violoncello, harp 

and organ. 

Organ Postlude — "Fugue in C Minor" _ _ _ Bach 

April 16 — Easter Celebration: 

Cantata — "The Risen Christ" _____ Otis 

For solo voices, chorus, orchestra and organ. 
Violoncello Solo — "Adagio Pathetique" - - Godard 
The Sermon — Text, "I am Crucified with Christ; neverthe- 
less I Live; yet not \, but Christ liveth in me." 
(Galatians ii: 20.) Subject, "The Prince of Life." 
Rev. John N. Freeman, D. D. 
VioUn Solo — "Meditation Religieuse" - - Massenet 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" - - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

Easter Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Miss Mabel J. Chamber- 
lin, Miss iMargaret Stevenson, and Miss Nellie Overpack, 
sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. Bracken, Mrs. James C. Ames, 
Mrs. F. F. Bradley, and Mrs. H. A. Salchert, altos; Mr. 
John B. Miller, Mr. C. H. Ogden, and Mr. Carl L. Morse, 
tenors; Mr. Oscar G. Erickson, Mr. Charles T. Atkinson, 
and Mr. J. L. Porter, basses. 

Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Richard Seidel (violins) , Mr. 
Franz H. Esser and Mr. George Dasch (violas), Mr. Bruno 
Steindel (violoncello), IMr. Hans Parbs and Mr. V. Jiskra, 
(double basses), Mr. Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Alfred 
Barthel (oboe and English horn), Mr. Leopold de Mar^, 
(French horn), Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp); Mr. Joseph 
Zettelmann (kettle-drums). IMr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 
Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 




>HX B. MII.LHK 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 187 

May 7 — The bulletin records the death, May 2, of Mr. Adam 
Craig, for twenty years or more the faithful leader of 
music in our Sunday-school. 

May 27 — Saturday. Through the courtesy of Mr. Wallace 
G. Clark, a Trustee of the Sanitary District of Chicago, 
who gave us the illustrated lecture on the Drainage Canal 
in the Church parlors on Thursday evening. May 18, 
the Men's League and its friends were again highly 
favored by him. 

Mr. Clark generously offered the use of the Drainage 
Board's private launch, "Robert R.," for a trip through the 
Canal and a visit to the controlling works, locks and power 
plant at Lockport. Sixty members of the League and their 
friends had a delightful and instructive outing. Mr. Clark 
accompanied the party and explained the elaborate ma- 
chinery and engineering employed by the Sanitary Board in 
the construction and operation of the Canal. A luncheon 
served on the launch added much to the enjoyment of the 
occasion. 

May 28— 

Anthem — "Break Forth Into Joy" - - - Fisher 

Response — "O Wisdom" - _ _ _ _ Noble 

Dr. Freeman's subject was, "The Root of Courage," based 
on the text, "Sirs, be of good cheer." (Acts xxvii: 25.) 
Paul, with other prisoners, on a ship laden with corn, 
going to Rome, was shipwrecked at Melita. Naval 
men today say that the Apostle's description of this 
scene at sea affords valuable testimony as to the char- 
acter of ancient seamanship. Paul was virtually in com- 
mand of the ship and here displayed courage of the high- 
est order. Courage is a quality of mind, which enables 
men, without fear, to face danger. 

June 18 — Mrs. Frances C. Libbe (A.), in the absence of Mrs. 
Bracken, who has gone abroad for a few months of study. 
Offertory — "The Morning Prayer." (From "EH.") Costa 
Mrs. Libbe. 

June 25— Mr. Milton B. Griffith (T.) in the absence of Mr. 
Miller. 

Offertory — "Light" ----- Stevenson 

Mr. Griffith. 

July 2 — Bulletin announces the death, June 25, of Mrs. 
Florence Otis Buckingham, at Pittsfield, Mass. Mrs. 



188 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Buckingham was a daughter of the late Mr. Joseph E. 
Otis of Chicago, and is survived by her husband, Mr. 
Henry W. Buckingham, one daughter and three sons. 
She was a sister of Mr. Joseph E. Otis, Jr., Mr. Ralph C. 
Otis and Mrs. John E. Jenkins, all of Chicago. 

Sunday morning services were held through July, Dr. Free- 
man in the pulpit. Mrs. Helen G. Barrows (A.), and Mr. 
Edward J. Walker (T.). 

During August, the Sunday morning services were omitted. 
The mid-week services were conducted by the Rev. C. E. 
Boyer. 

A series of addresses on the Twenty-third Psalm, en- 
titled, "Saunterings in Bethlehem Uplands," to be given on 
successive Wednesday evenings by Dr. Freeman, was com- 
menced September 6. Subject, "A Morning Meal on the 
Meadows." 

September 13 — "A Mid-day Drink from the Well." 
September 20 — "A Noonday Rest in the Shade," etc. 
October 22 — 

Prelude — "Andante in D" ----- Silas 

Offertory — "My Song shall be ahvay Thy Mercy" 

--------- Mendelssohn 

(From "The Hymn of Praise.") 
Mrs. Trimble and Mr. Miller. 

October 28 — Saturday. Funeral services of Mrs. John B. 
Drake, from her late residence, 2114 Calumet avenue, 
conducted by Dr. Freeman, with the assistance of the 
Choir. Mrs. Drake died October 25, 1911. Mrs. Drake was 
born in Madison, Indiana, April 16, 1843; came to Chicago 
in 1855; married Mr. John B. Drake, February 24, 1863; 
had been a member of the First Church for thirty-five 
years. At a special meeting of the Elders, Trustees and 
Deacons held Monday evening, October 30, resolutions 
were adopted, expressing to the family of Mrs. John B, 
Drake, the sincere sympathy of the officers of the Church 
and their high appreciation of her long, devoted services, 
her loyalty to the Church and its interests. Her noble 
Christian character possessed a love and tenderness which 
found expression in quiet, personal interest, devotion and 
charity, and enriched the lives of all who knew her. Her 
daughter. Miss Helen V. Drake, is deeply interested in 
the Church Sunday-school, Presbyterian Hospital, and 
Mission Boards. Mr. Tracy C. Drake, son of Mrs. John 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 189 

B. Drake, was Superintendent of the Sunday-school for 
some years; member of the Board of Trustees (1900). 

October 29 — The bulletin announced the death, October 21, 
1911, of Mrs. Alexander Murison, mother of Mrs. Henry 
M. Curtis and Mr. George W. Murison. Mrs. Murison 
was born June 22, 1825, in Montrose, Scotland; came to 
Chicago in 1870; admitted to membership in the First 
Church in the autumn of 1870. Mr. Alexander Murison 
died March 14, 1876, in Rome, Italy. 

November 5 — The Special Musical Services were resumed 
this morning for the winter months. The regular Choir 
will be assisted by Miss Mabel J. Chamberlin and Mrs. 
F. E. Sorensen, sopranos; Mrs. James C. Ames and Miss 
Hazel Heimbeck, altos; Mr. C. H. Ogden (T.), Mr. Nor- 
man R. Rose (B.), and Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp). 

The service this morning consisted of selections from the 
works of Mendelssohn. Dr. Freeman spoke on, "His 
gracious words" from the text, "And all bear Him witness, 
and wonder at the gracious words," etc. (St. Luke iv: 
22.) After the sermon, Mr. Tramonti played the "Com- 
munion" by Godefroid, a fitting prelude to the Sacra- 
ment of the Lord's Supper, which closed the service. 

November 8 — Wednesday evening. Dr. Freeman spoke on 
"Foregleams of the Heavenly Dawn," being the last of 
his mid-week series of addresses on "The Twenty-Third 
Psalm." 

November 12 — 

Anthem — "King, all Glorious" - - - - Barnby 

Violoncello Solo — "Aria" _ _ _ _ Pergolesi 

Mr. Hans Hess. 

Offertory — "The Nazarene" _ _ _ Joseph Adams 

Mrs. Bracken, accompanied by violoncello, harp and 

organ. 

Anthem— "Still, Still With Thee" - - - Foote 

Accompanied by flute, viola, harp and organ. 
Duo for flute and viola — "A Russian Folk Song" Glinka 

Messrs. Quensel and Esser. 
Organ Postlude — "Pilgrims' Chorus" ("Tannhauser.") 

---------- Wagner 

Mr. Moore. 

November 27 — Monday evening. An illustrated lecture on 
"Italy, her People, and her Cathedrals," was given in the 
parlors of the Church, by Mr. Albert L. Berry, under the 
auspices of the IMen's League and was attended by a 
large representation of the men and women of the Con- 
gregation. 



190 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

December 3 — 

Prelude — "Melodie" ----- Charpentier. 

Flute, viola, harp and organ. 
Anthem— "The Silent Sea" - - - - Niedlinger 

Accompanied by flute, viola, harp and organ. 
Duo for flute and viola — "A Russian Folk Song" (No. 2) 

---------- Glinka 

Messrs. Quensel and Esser, accompanied by harp and 
organ. 

December 10 — 

Prelude — "Adagietto" ------ HoUman 

Violoncello solo, Mr. Hess. 

0£fertory — "Let not your Heart be Troubled" Ward 

Mr. Miller, accompanied by violoncello and organ. 

Dr. Freeman continued his series of discourses on "The Be- 
atitudes" speaking today on the seventh, "Blessed are 
the merciful; for they shall obtain mercy." (St. Matt. 
v:7.) 

December 17 — 

Anthem — "Brightest and Best" - - - - Manney 

Accompanied by viohn, horn, harp and organ. 

Anthem — "Mount Carmel" ----- Foote 

For women's voices, accompanied by violin, horn, harp 

and organ. 

The Sermon — Rev. John Newton Freeman, D. D. Subject, 

"The Eighth Beatitude," "Blessed are the pure in 

heart; for they shall see God." (St. Matt, v: 8.) 

Duo for violin and horn — "Meditation" - Carolus-Duran 

December 24 — Christmas Celebration: 

Prelude — "Pastorale" ------- Otis 

Anthem — "Our Saviour's Birth" - _ _ _ Qtis 

Anthem — "It Came upon the Midnight Clear" 

--------- H. W. Parker 

Violoncello Solo — "Romance" - - - Boellman 

Mr. Steindel. 

Anthem~"0 Thou That Tellest" - - - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mrs. Bracken and chorus. 

Offertory — "If God be for Us, \\'ho can be Against Us" 

---------- Handel 

Mr. Miller. 

The Sermon — Rev. John Newton Freeman, D. D. Subject, 

"Echoing the Angel Song;" text, "Glory to God in the 

highest, and on earth, peace, good-will toward men." 

(St. Luke ii: 14.) 

Violin Solo — "Meditation" - - - - Bach-Gounod 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "For Unto us a Child is Born" Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Moore. 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Mrs. Frederick E. Soren- 
sen, Miss Mabel J. Chamberlin, and Miss Claribelle Rice, 




AR r.i >Rl>i '\ HklCKS( >.\ 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 191 

sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. Bracken, Mrs. James C. Ames, 
Miss Hazel Heimbeck, and Miss Ethel Hall, altos; Mr. 
John B. Miller, Mr. C. H. Ogden, and Mr. Edward Munsen, 
tenors; Mr. O. Gordon Erickson, Mr. Norman R. Rose, 
and Mr. Otto Highfield, basses. 
Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Richard Seidel (violins), Mr. 
Franz H. Esser and Mr. George Dasch (violas), Mr. Bruno 
Steindel (violoncello), Mr. V. Jiskra and Mr. Hans Parbs 
(double basses) , Mr. Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Alfred 
Barthel (oboe and English horn), Mr. Leopold de Mare 
(French horn), Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph 
Zettelmann (kettle-drums). Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 
Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

December 31 — 

Cantata — "Wondrous Words of Love" _ - - Otis 
The regular Choir was assisted in this service by Mrs. Freder- 
ick E. Sorensen and i\Iiss Claribelle Rice, sopranos; Miss 
Ethel Hall and Miss Hazel Heimbeck, altos; Mr. C. H. 
Ogden (T.) and Mr. N. R. Rose (B.). 

Messrs. Krauss (violin), Esser (viola), Hess (violoncello), 
de Mare (horn), and Tramonti (harp). 

Dr. Freeman spoke on the subject, "God's Timely Gift." 
Text, "A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit 
will I put within you," etc. (Ezekiel xxxvi: 26.) 

1912 

The Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble and Miss Mabel J. Chamber- 
lin, sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. Bracken and Mrs. James 
C. Ames, altos; Mr. John B. Miller and Mr. C. H. Ogden, 
tenors; Mr. O. Gordon Erickson and Mr. Norman R. 
Rose, basses. Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp). Mr. Francis 
S. Moore (O.). Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

January 28 — 

Prelude — "Pastorale" ------ Otis 

Anthem for Christmas-tide, "O Sing to God" - Gounod 

Carol — "Christ is Born, the Angels Sing" - - Otis 
Offertory — "If God be for Us, Who can be Against Us" 

---------- Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

Mr. Miller. 

Duo for violin and violoncello — "Intermezzo" - Pizzi 

Dr. Freeman spoke on "Established Steps." Text, "Order 
my steps in thy word." (Ps. cxix: 133.) 

Messrs. Krauss (violin), Hess ('cello) and Tramonti (harp), 
assisted in this service. 



192 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

January 31 — Wednesday evening. Mr. W. R. Stirling gave 
an informal talk to the members of the Men's League 
and their friends, on "Grenfell of Labrador," in the par- 
lors of the Church. The lecture was illustrated with 
stereopticon views. Last summer, Mr. Stirling spent six 
weeks in northern Newfoundland and Labrador, in- 
vestigating Dr. Grenfell's work and local conditions, and 
this evening set forth the methods and purposes of the 
noted missionary explorer. 

February 11 — Abraham Lincoln Memorial service: 

Choir was assisted by Messrs. Krauss (violin), Hess (violon- 
cello), de Mare (horn), Zettelmann (drums), andTramonti 
(harp). 

Prelude — "Largo" _______ Handel 

Violin solo, Mr Krauss 

Anthem — "See, the Conquering Hero Comes" - Handel 

Offertory — "Land of Hope and Glory" _ - - Elgar 

Dr. Freeman spoke on "Lincoln the Dedicated." Text, 
"Neither count I my life dear unto myself, so that I 
might finish my course with joy." (Acts xx: 24.) 

March 24 — The Choir was assisted by Messrs. Krauss (violin), 
de Mare (horn), and Tramonti (harp). 

Prelude — "Romance" - - - _ - Saint-Saens 

Solo for horn, Mr. de Mare. 

Offertory — "Mount Carmel" _ _ _ _ Foote 

For women's voices, accompanied by violin, horn, 

harp and organ. 

VioHn Solo — "Harp Aria" (From "Esther.") - Handel 

Mr. Krauss, accompanied by harp and organ. 

March 31 — 

Prelude — "Reverie" ______ Ganne 

Oboe, 'cello, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Blessed Jesus" _ - - - _ Dvorak 

Passion Music. 
Aria — "Our God, the Heavenly Circle FiUing" Handel 

Mrs. Trimble. 
Chorale— "I Will Stay Here Beside Thee" - Bach 

Accompanied by oboe, 'cello, harp and organ. 
The Sermon— Rev. John N. Freeman, D. D. Text, "Took 
branches of palm trees and went out to meet Him and 
cried, 'Hosanna.' " (St. John xii: 13.) 
Duo for English horn and violoncello, "Cantilene" 

--------- Boisdeffre 

Messrs. Barthel and Steindel. 

Organ Postlude — "Festival March" - - Claussman 

Mr. Moore. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 193 

April 7 — Easter Celebration: 

Cantata — "The Risen Christ" ----- Otis 

For sok5 voices, chorus, orchestra and organ. 
Violoncello Solo — "Berceuse" _ - - - Godard 

Mr. Steindel. 
The Sermon — Rev. John N. Freeman, D. D. Subject, "The 
Life Triumphant." Text, "Whom God hath raised up, 
having loosed the pains of death." (Acts ii: 24.) 
Violin Solo — "Meditation Religieuse" ("Thais") Massenet 

Mr. Krauss. 
Organ Postlude — "The Hallelujah Chorus" ("The Mes- 
siah") -------- Handel 

Mr. Moore. 

The Easter Choir : Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Mrs. Lucille R. 
Lenox, Miss Mabel J. Chamberlin, and Miss Claribelle 
Rice, sopranos; Mrs. Willard S. Bracken, Miss Ethel 
Hall, Miss Lyravinne Votaw, and Miss Melicent Water- 
house, altos; Mr. John B. Miller, Mr. C. H. Ogden, and 
Mr. Edward Munsen, tenors; Mr. O. Gordon Erickson, 
Mr. Norman R. Rose, and Mr. Edward Quinn, basses. 

Mr. Alexander Krauss and Mr. Richard Seidel (violins), Mr. 
Franz H. Esser and Mr. George Dasch (violas), Mr. Bruno 
Steindel (violoncello), Mr. Hans Parbs and Mr. V. Jiskra 
(double basses), Mr. Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Alfred 
Barthel (oboe and English horn), Mr. Leopold de Mare 
(French horn), Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph 
Zettelmann (kettle-drums). Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). 
Mr. Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

April 11 — Thursday evening. Lecture in the parlors of the 
Church, before the Men's League, on "The History of the 
Pilgrims," by Mr. Seymour Morris. The lecture was 
beautifully illustrated with colored views of England and 
Holland, where the Pilgrim Movement started, and of 
that portion of America where the Pilgrims made their 
first settlement. 

April 21 — Memorial service for victims of the "Titanic" 
disaster. 

Anthem— "Happy and Blest are They" ("St. Paul") 

--------- Mendelssohn 

Response — "Crossing the Bar" - - - - Parry 

Dr. Freeman's theme was, "Singer and Song Master." Text, 
"I will allure her and bring her into the wilderness." 
(Hosea ii: 14.) 

Only the brave, the buoyant, the cheerful can sing in the 
hour of peril. Paul and Silas in their dungeon; Rutherford, 
the English martyr in prison; and ^Nlme. Guyon in the Bastille, 



194 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

all sang, knowing they were facing death. The whole of this 
awful sea drama was in a quiet, reposeful tonality; no ex- 
citement, no insubordination. Survivors in the boats and 
those on the ship, singing with the band, "Nearer, my God, 
to Thee." Astor, Butt, Strauss Ryerson, Captain Smith — 
all died bravely, upholding the traditions of the Anglo-Saxon 
race, "Noblesse Oblige." 

May 5 — The bulletin announces the death on April 26, at 
the Sanitarium in Hinsdale, Illinois, of Dr. Daniel Kim- 
ball Pearsons, philanthropist and a former Trustee of 
this Church, who has given six million dollars to schools 
and colleges in the United States. He was born, April 
14, 1820, in Bradford, Vt. This farmer's boy inherited 
no money, but managed, by hard work, to save a little, 
wath which he acquired a year of study at Dartmouth 
College. Then he studied medicine at Hanover, N. H., 
and afterward attended a medical school at Woodstock, 
Vt. In 1851, he was married, and with his wife, came to 
Janesville, Wis. The young Yankee doctor, not satis- 
fied with the returns from medical practice, put all his 
money into farming lands. The Chicago Tribune said 
of him : 

"He bought timber lands, when timber w^as worth but 
little. His friends said he would lose all the money he had, 
but he kept right on buying. Finally he had all the loose 
timber lands he could buy. Then his friends came back to 
him to buy the timber. He sold it for more than he paid for 
the land and timber, and then sold the land itself for an 
additional profit. His dollars grew into hundreds — hundreds 
into thousands — thousands into millions." 

Dr. Pearsons said to a Tribune reporter a few wrecks be- 
fore his death: 

"I know what money means and how hard it is to ac- 
quire. I know it is a sin to waste money; for it can do much 
good. When money is not doing positive good, it is doing 
positive harm. There is no such thing as harmless idleness." 
Dr. Pearsons was a member of the Board of Trustees of 
this Church from October, 1871, until December, 1885. At 
a meeting of the Church and Society, held December 9, 1885, 
the following resolution, offered by ]\Ir. H. M. Sherwood, was 
adopted : 

"That the thanks of this Church and Society are due to 
and are hereby tendered Dr. Daniel K. Pearsons, who was 




DAXIKI. KIM BALI. I'KAKSOX.^ 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 195 

President of the Board of Trustees for several years (until 
his recent removal to a suburban town), for his faithful and 
devoted services, wise counsel and liberal gifts, especially 
during the financial distress of this Church." 

April 28— 

Prelude — "Vorspiel" ("Lohengrin") - - Wagner 

Anthem — "The Hour of Prayer" _ _ _ Scott 

The Journal says, "A wet, cold day." Dr. Freeman's subject, 
drawn from Daniel iii: 18, "But if not, * * * we will 
not serve thy gods," etc. Watson, the English poet, in 
a recent lecture before the Twentieth Century Club of this 
city, spoke of the Bible stories as unsurpassed for 
poetic beauty, picturesqueness, and conformity to the 
highest form of dramatic action. This is especially true 
of the stories of Ruth, Esther, and Daniel. "Whether 
the third chapter of Daniel," said Dr. Freeman, "be 
history or romance, the dramatic features are intense. 
Here we have true manhood, true courage. The real 
heroes of this world, men and women, have stood for 
Christian faith." 

May 12 — Choir assisted by Miss Mabel J. Chamberlin (S.), 
Mrs. James C. Ames (A.) and Mr. Hans Hess (violon- 
cello) . 

Prelude — "Aria" ------- Pergolesi 

Violoncello solo, Mr. Hess. 
Anthem — "There is a Fountain" - - _ _ Qtis 

Accompanied by violoncello and organ. 
Violoncello Solo — "Elegie" - - - - Massenet 

Mr. Hess. 

June 9 — Children's Day. Exercises under the direction of 
Col. Charles Ailing, Jr., Superintendent of the Home 
School, and Col. J. M. Emery, of the Railroad Mission 
School. 

Offertory — "Grasses and Lilies" - - - - Bartlett 
Mrs. Bracken. 

Dr. Freeman spoke about "The Growing Lilies." Text, "And 
why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies 
of the field, how they grow." (St. Matt, vi: 28.) 

June 16 — Miss Martha Jones (S.) in the absence of Mrs. 
Trimble. 

Prelude — "In Paradise" - _ - - _ Dubois 

Anthem — "The Lord is My Light" - - >Liitland 

Offertory — "Angelas" - ' - - - - Chaminade 

Miss Jones and Mrs. Bracken. 



196 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Dr. Freeman's subject was "My Possible Self." Text, "Now 
if I do that I would not." (Rom. vii: 20.) 

The shortest word in the English language is the pronoun 
"I." "Your own soul, the Ego," "your possible self" 
did not commit that particular wrong which troubled 
you, but it was "the sin which dwelleth in me." "It 
might have been," is a sad thought, when we reflect on 
wasted opportunities, the friends we might have made, 
the good we should have done. This is what the Apostle 
means. It is a trying moment when a man comes face 
to face with his "possible self." 

June 19 — Wednesday evening. Special meeting of the 
Church and Society. The report of the Joint Committee 
of the First and Forty-first Street Presbyterian Churches 
was presented by Mr. S. Leonard Boyce, chairman, and 
on motion received. After discussion it was voted to 
postpone action on the report until the Annual Meeting, 
December 2, 1912. On motion, a special committee of 
five women and four men was appointed to investigate 
the plan of building a new Church in Kenwood, and to 
report at the Annual Meeting in December. 

June 23 — Sunday afternoon. Second Presbyterian Church; 
funeral services of Mr. WilHam Morris Baker, conducted 
by the Rev. John B. Shaw, D. D. Mr. Baker died June 20, 
aged seventy-six. My friendship with him dates from the 
days of Calvary Presbyterian Church (1868-1871). After 
the consolidation of the First and Calvary Presbyterian 
Churches, Mr. Baker withdrew to the Second Church, 
and in 1888 was elected an Elder. "In such a life as his," 
said Dr. Shaw, "we find a picture of Thyself, O Lord; 
sincerity, piety, and fidehty." 

June 24— Monday, 4:00 P. M. Wedding ceremony of Mr. 
Addison Ballard Bradley and Miss Catherine D. Shedd 
in the First Church, conducted by the Rev. John Archi- 
bald Morison, D. D., assisted by the Rev. John Newton 
Freeman, D. D. Dr. Morison came from his home in 
St. John, N. B., Canada, to take part in this wedding. 

He was present at the prayer service in the evening, and 
was welcomed by many of his old friends. 

June 30— Mrs. Ruby C. Ledward (S.) in the absence of Mrs. 
Trimble, Mr. WilHam B. Ross (T.), in the absence of Mr. 
Miller, and Mr. Albert Borroff (B.) in the absence of 
Mr. Erickson. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 197 

Offertory — "It is Enough" (From "Elijah") Mendelssohn 

Mr. Borroff. 
Anthem — "Like Noah's Weary Dove." _ - - Otis 

July 14 — Mr. Albert DeRiemer (B.) in the absence of Mr. 
Erickson. 

Anthem — "The Righteous Shall Flourish" - Calkin 

Offertory — "How Long, O Lord Wilt Thou Forget Me" 

---------- Rogers 

Mr. DeRiemer. 
The Sermon — Rev. John Newton Freeman, D. D. Text, 
"And they continued steadfastly in the Apostles' doc- 
trine and fellowship." (Acts ii: 42.) Subject, "Teach- 
ing and Fellowship." 

July 28— All the Choir numbers from the works of Mr. Philo 
Adams Otis. 
Prelude — "Benedict us." 
Anthem — "The Glories of the Messiah." 
Anthem — "There is a Fountain Filled with Blood." 
Offertory — "I will Never Leave Thee." 
Sermon — Rev. John Newton Freeman, D. D. Text, "Send 

thee help from the sanctuary." (Ps. xx: 2.) Subject, 

"Sanctuary Help." 
Anthem — "Like' Noah's Weary Dove." 
Postlude — Prelude to Christmas Cantata, "Wondrous Words 

of Love." 

Mr. Moore. 

During the month of August and until September 8, the 
Sunday morning services were omitted. 

Our vacation days were again spent among the mountains 
of New Hampshire. On our return from summer wander- 
ings, we spent a few days in New York City. 

September 29— 10:30 A. M. Service at the Brick Presby- 
terian Church, New York City, of which the Rev. William 
Pierson Merrill, D. D., formerly of the Sixth Presbyterian 
Church of Chicago, is Minister, and Mr. Clarence Dickin- 
son, another Chicago man, is organist and choirmaster. 
Prelude — "Third Symphony" _ _ _ _ Guilmant 

Anthem — "The One Hundred and Twenty-First Psalm" Otis 
Offertory— "O God Have Mercy" (From "St. Paul.") 

--------- Mendelssohn 

Mr. Croxton. 
Postlude — "Canzona" ----- - Gabrieli 

Mr. Dickinson. 

In the absence of Dr. Merrill, the Rev. John Winthrop Plat- 
ner, D. D., of Andover Theological Seminary, was the 
preacher. Dr. Platner called attention to two directly 
contradictory verses in the Scriptures: "That which is 
crooked cannot be made straight," (Ecc. i: 15). "The 
crooked shall be made straight," (Isaiah xl: 4). 



198 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

The Old Testament is not a mere record of dates and events. 
It is a portrayal of thoughts, actions, and deeds which 
are typical of human life today. These two voices from 
ancient Jewish history show two attitudes of mankind. 
Ecclesiastes bewails the endless monotony of human life. 
Everything is wrong, nothing is right. The crooked will 
remain crooked! Nothing new or good under the sun! 
All is vanity, saith the preacher! A sombre picture this! 

But Isaiah is more hopeful and gives a brighter tone to life. 
Wrongs will be corrected. The Messiah is coming and 
the prophet declared that there is no limit to what the 
living God can achieve. 

"Every valley shall be exalted and every mountain and hill 
shall be made low; and the crooked shall be made 
straight." These two oracles from ancient days are akin 
to the "Everlasting Yes" and "Everlasting No" of Carlyle. 

October 6 — Mr. Erickson (B.) resumed his place in the 
Choir last Sunday, September 29. 

Prelude — "Adagio" _____ Saint-Saens 

Offertory — "It is Enough." (From "Elijah.") Mendelssohn 

Mr. Erickson. 

October 27 — 

Prelude — "In Paradise" _____ Dubois 

Anthem — "Hail to the Lord's Anointed" - - Andrews 
Anthem — "This is the Hour of Prayer" - - Scott 

Offertory — "Holiest, Breathe an Evening Blessing" 

--------- John E. West 

Mrs. Bracken. 

Dr. Freeman spoke on "The Parable of the Lamp." Text, 
"Neither do men light a candle." (St. Matt, v: 15.) The 
illustrations used by Christ and his Apostles are of a 
homely character, such as come within the daily exper- 
ience of their followers. "Lamp," "candlestick," "candle," 
"bushel," are the ordinary articles used in every Jewish 
household. The text is one of a cluster of sayings of our 
Lord, which reflect the truth at various angles. The 
Minister drew three thoughts from the text: (1) "The 
Lighted Candle." (2) "Harmful Hiding." (3) "Helpful 
Shining." 

November 10 — 

Prelude — "In Summer" _____ Stebbins 
Anthem — "While we have Time" - - H. W. Parker 
Offertory — "The Ninety and Nine" _ _ _ Campion 

Mr. Miller. 
Postlude — "Festival Piece" - - _ _ _ Stebbins 

The Minister spoke on the theme — "He and All His." Text, 
"And was baptized, he and all his, straightway." (Acts 



PULPIT AXD CHOIR. 199 

xvi: 33). A similar thought is expressed by Joshua: 
"As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord." The 
ideal Church consists of members of the ideal home, 
whose head "and all his" serve the Lord. Three points 
were noted by Dr. Freeman: (1) "The family is the 
foundation of Church and State." (2) "Headship." (3) 
"Reciprocity, in order that members of the family should 
live and work together for the best interests of all." 

November 17 — The Special IMusical Services are resumed, to 
continue until December 29, at which time the com- 
mittee on the new Church will be ready to report. 

Mrs. Clara G.Trimble, Miss Mabel J.Chamberlin, and MissClari- 
belle Rice, sopranos; Mrs. W. S. Bracken, Mrs. James C. 
Ames, and Miss Lyravinne Votaw, altos; Mr. John B. 
Miller and Mr. Walter H. Chambers, tenors; -Mr. O. Gor- 
don Erickson and Mr. John B. Plasman, basses. 
Prelude — "Andante in D" ----- HoUins 

Trio — "One by One the Sands are Flowing" - Scott 

Mrs. Trimble, Mrs. Bracken, and Mr. Miller. 

Dr. Freeman spoke on "Christ for Our Country," the first of 
a series of sermons on "Timely Themes," to continue 
until December 29. 

November 24 — The Choir, assisted by ^Ir. Hans Hess (violon- 
cello) and Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp). 
Prelude — 1. "Adagio con Moto" - - Saint-Saens 

Violoncello, harp and organ. 
2. Harp solo, "Romance" - - Rubinstein 

Mr. Tramonti. 
Anthem — "Henceforth, when ye Hear His Voice" 

--------- Mendelssohn 

Solo for violoncello — "Aria" _ - _ Pergolesi 

Mr. Hess. 

Offertory — "Teach Me, O Lord" - - _ Manney 

Mrs. Trimble, accompanied by violoncello, harp and 

organ. 

Sermon by the Rev. Edgar P. Hill, D. D., on the subject of 
Home Missions. 

December 1 — 

Prelude — "Benedictus" _-_-_- Qtis 

VioHn, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem— "The Eternal God is Thy Refuge" John E. West 

Accompanied by violin, violoncello, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "The Silent Sea" - - - - Niedlinger 

Offertory — "Eventide" - _ _ _ jo^n E. West 

Mrs. Bracken, accompanied by violin, violoncello, 

harp and organ. 

Duo for violin and violoncello — "A Song without Words" 

---------- Faure 

Messrs. Krauss and Hess. 



200 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Dr. Freeman spoke on "The Mystic Ladder," the second of 
his series of discourses on "Timely Themes." Text, "And 
he dreamed, and behold a ladder," etc. (Gen. xxviii: 
12.) 

December 2 — Monday, 8 P. M. Annual meeting of the 
Church and Society. On motion, Mr. Henry W. Dudley 
was made chairman of the meeting, and Mr. Henry H. 
Munger, Secretary. The report of the Treasurer, Mr. 
Charles T. Otis, was then read and accepted. The Sec- 
retary of the meeting was authorized to cast the ballot 
for the former Board of Trustees; Messrs. S. Leonard 
Boyce, Charles T. Otis, Philo A. Otis, E. C. Greenman, 
and William Sumner Smith. On motion, the following 
Music Committee was appointed: Messrs. Philo A. Otis, 
Ernest A. Hamill, and Francis S. Moore. The Chairman 
then called for the report of the committee on new 
building, appointed at the meeting held June 19. Miss 
Helen V. Drake, chairman of said committee, reported 
that after earnest, faithful, and self-sacrificing efforts, 
the funds could not be raised for the new Church, and on 
behalf of the committee, tendered their resignations. 

Miss Margaretta E. Otis, Treasurer of the committee, then 
reported that in cash and pledges (conditional), the 
committee had received upwards of $83,000 only. On 
motion, the report was accepted and an unanimous vote 
of thanks was given to the committee. 

The meeting thereupon sustained by ballot, the report of the 
Joint Committee, adopted June 7, 1912, favoring the 
union with the Forty-first Street Presbyterian Church, 
and instructing the Session and Trustees to carry out 
the provisions of the report. 

December 8 — 

Prelude — "Romance" ----- Saint-Saens 

Solo for horn, Mr. de Mare, accompanied by violin, 
harp and organ. 
Anthem — "The One Hundred and Twenty-first Psalm" 

----------- Otis 

Anthem — "Mount Carmel" ----- Foote 

For women's voices, accompanied by violin, horn, 
harp and organ. 

Sermon by the Rev. Charles L. Thompson, D. D., of New 
York City, on the general work of Home Missions. Text, 
"And when the cherubims went, the wheels went by 
them." (Ezekiel x: 16.) The preacher suggested three 
thoughts in this sermon: (1) The complex social prob- 
lems facing the people of the United States today are of 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 201 

the gravest character. No nation was ever confronted 
with such a condition. The United States is spoken of 
as "The Melting Pot," of the world. (2) Civilization is 
advancing with such tremendous strides that it will soon 
outstrip the capabilities of man. (3) The first note of 
socialism was sounded in the last election. The preacher 
closed with the hope that a higher type of manhood may 
be evolved out of the conglomerate mass of aliens now 
pouring into the United States. He referred to the 
tragic scenes he had witnessed in the ofhce of the Emi- 
gration Bureau on Ellis Island, New York, amid the 
efforts of the authorities to keep out the undesirables. 

Duo for violin and horn — "A Dream" - - Faure 

Messrs. Krauss and de Mare. 

Organ Postlude — "Marche du Synode" - Saint-Saens 

Mr. Moore. 

December 15 — 

Prelude— "Serenade" ------ Tittl 

For flute, horn, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Sing a Song of Praise" - - John E. West 
Offertory — "Whoso Hath this World's Good" - - Otis 

Accompanied by flute, horn, harp and organ. 
Duo for flute and horn — "Confidence" - Hasselmans 

Messrs. Quensel and de Mare, accompanied by harp 
and organ. 

Dr. Freeman spoke on "Invisible Allies," the third of the 
series of sermons on "Timely Themes." Text, "And 
they went forth and preached everywhere." (St. Mark 
xvi:20.) 

December 22 — 

Prelude — "Reverie" ______ Ganne 

Oboe, 'cello, harp and organ. 
Anthem — "Calm on the List'ning Ear of Night" 

--------- H. W. Parker 

Carol — "Christ is Born, the Angels Sing" _ _ - Otis 

Offertory — "A Light from Heaven" - - _ Gounod 

Mrs. Trimble, accompanied by oboe, 'cello, harp and 

organ. 

Duo for English horn and 'cello — "Cantilene" Boisdeffre 

Messrs. Barthel and Steindel. 

Dr. Freeman spoke on "White gifts for Christ," the fourth of 
the series on "Timely Themes." Text, "And when they 
had opened their treasures, they presented unto Him 
gifts." (St. Matt, ii: 11.) 

December 29 — Christmas Celebration. Union service, in 
which the members of the Forty-first Street Presbyterian 
Church, with their Minister, the Rev. WiUiam Chalmers 



202 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Covert, D. D., took part; the last service in this build- 
ing, which was dedicated February 6, 1873. 

Cantata — "Wondrous Words of Love" - - _ Qtis 

For solo voices, chorus, orchestra and organ. 
Violoncello Solo — "The Song of the Shepherds" - Otis 

Mr. Steindel. 
Violin Solo — "Meditation" - - - - Massenet 

Mr. Krauss. 

Organ Postlude — "The Hallelujah Chorus" - Handel 

(From "The Messiah.") 

The Christmas Choir: Mrs. Clara G. Trimble, Mrs. Lucille R. 
Lenox, Miss Mabel J. Chamberlin, Miss Claribelle Rice, 
Miss Hilda Brown, and Miss Ruth Sharp, sopranos; Mrs. 
Willard S. Bracken, Miss Lyravinne Votaw, Miss Edna 
Wilson, Miss May Welch, and Mrs. Huldah Beers, altos; 
Mr. John B. Miller, Mr. Edward Munsen, and Mr. Walter 
Chambers, tenors; Mr. O. Gordon Erickson, Mr. John B. 
Plasman, Mr. David Merriam, and Mr. Charles T. Atkin- 
son, basses. 

The orchestra (Chicago Symphony) : Mr. Alexander Krauss, 
Mr. Richard Seidel, Mr. Alexander Zukowsky, and Mr. 
Luther Nurnberger (violins), Mr. Franz H. Esser and Mr. 
George Dasch (violas), Mr. Bruno Steindel (violoncello), 
Mr. V. Jiskra and Mr. Hans Parbs (double basses), Mr. 
Alfred Quensel (flute), Mr. Alfred Barthel (oboe and Eng- 
lish horn), Mr. Leopold de Mare and Mr. Max Pottag, 
(horns), Mr. Enrico Tramonti (harp), Mr. Joseph Zettel- 
mann, (kettle-drums). Mr. Francis S. Moore (O.). Mr. 
Philo Adams Otis, choirmaster. 

Dr. Freeman's theme was "A Glorious Inventory." Text, 
"Therefore let no man glory in men; for all things are 
yours." (I Cor. iii: 21, 22.) The Minister reviewed the 
work of the Church in its eighty years of life, referring 
especially to the five houses of worship it has occupied 
since its foundation in 1833. He paid a glowing tribute 
to the founder, Jeremiah Porter, and the eight Ministers 
who succeeded him; all of whom have passed away, ex- 
cepting John Archibald Morison, now of St. John, N. B., 
Canada. Dr. Covert, of the Forty-first Street Presby- 
terian Church, followed; "^lorturi te salutamus." "The 
First Church will live, will be given a newness of life, 
will become of greater community service. This crisis 
is only another step, another of the many crises that the 
Church has met courageously." Dr. Covert was most 
enthusiastic as he spoke of the future of the new First 
Church in the great field at Forty-first street, "already 
white for harvest." 









m^^^ 

^ ^ 


■ ^ 










PULPIT AND CHOIR. 203 

The Chicago Record-Herald said, on Monday, December 
30, of the above service: 

"The music yesterday, with Alexander Krauss, Bruno 
Steindel, Enrico Tramonti, Joseph Zettelmann, and many 
others of the Thomas Orchestra, and with Mrs. Clara G. 
Trimble, Mrs. W. S. Bracken, Mr. John B. Miller, and Mr. O. 
Gordon Erickson as soloists, in itself was a tribute to the 
Choirmaster, of nearly half a century — Philo Adams Otis." 



204 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR 

The foregoing pages are gathered from the Choir Journals 
which date from 1S75, and cover thirty-seven years in the 
life of this historic Church. Data of this kind are not usually 
kept by Churches in America. But in the Cathedrals of Eng- 
land it is the duty of an official known as the Succentor to 
keep such a record and to make an annual report to the 
Dean and Chapter. In closing these records of "Pulpit and 
Choir" in the old building at Indiana avenue and Twenty- 
first street, the Choirmaster takes this occasion to express 
his gratitude for the opportunity he has been afforded to carry 
out long cherished plans for a higher order of music in our Sun- 
day worship. The sincere thanks of the Music Committee are 
also conveyed to the men and women of the Congregation who 
have generously undertaken the cost of the Special Musical 
Services. 

The suggestion for the unusual combination of voices 
and instruments we have heard in our Church in recent years, 
comes from the village Choir of my childhood, when three 
manual-organs were unknown and the only instruments heard 
in Church, were the tuning fork, flute, and bass viol. To re- 
produce these effects in later years with the aid of the first 
artists of the Thomas Orchestra has been one of the pleasures 
of my life. From the half lights of those simple days with 
the village choristers, we have passed into the rich glow of 
the twentieth century, with its brilliancy and glory of in- 
strument and song. Those who have heard Tschaikowsky's 
"Hymn to the Autumn," Glinka's "Russian Folk Songs," 
Mozart's "Ave Verum Corpus," Handel's "Harp Aria," and 
"Passion Music," with the rare combination of instruments 
employed, will accept Dr. Merrill's tribute to the value of 
Church music : 

"You cannot attend the worship of a Church without 
being brought into contact with two wonderful collections of 
the expressed thought and feeling of man — the Bible and the 
hymnal. They are full storehouses of noble aspiration and 
pure expression. 

Beyond the beauty and power of the hymns, what an 




MRS. WII.I.ARD S. BRACKEN. 



PULPIT AND CHOIR. 205 

educational value is in the music of the Church. And it is in 
the Church that we get music at its best. In the simplest 
worthy setting of hymn or anthem, there is the same essential 
grace of form that charms us in symphony or sonata."^ 

The Choirmaster desires further to express to the prin- 
cipal members of the Choir his appreciation of their cordial 
sympathy and loyal support : 

Mrs. Clara Grifhth Trimble came to the First Church, 
May 2, 1897, from Plymouth Congregational Church, where 
she had been engaged for five years. Her home is in 
Ottawa, 111., but she spends much of her time in Chicago, 
in teaching and professional work. 

Mrs. Willard S. Bracken has been a member of the 
Choir since October IG, 1904. She is well known in the con- 
cert field, having appeared with the Handel and Haydn So- 
ciety of Boston, in the "Messiah," with the Apollo Musical 
Club of Chicago, and with the Thomas Orchestra on its tours. 
Mrs. Bracken is President of the Cosmopolitan School of 
Music of Chicago, and is a member (1913) of the present 
Choir of the First Church. 

Mr. John B. Miller came to the First Church Choir 
November 20, 1910. He is well known in concert and ora- 
torio w^ork, having appeared with the Apollo Musical Club 
and Mendelssohn Club of Chicago, and in the concerts of the 
Thomas Orchestra. He is a member of the Faculty and one 
of the Directors of the Chicago Musical College. Mr. Miller 
is now (1912) with the First Congregational Church of Evans- 
ton and' is one of the solo quartette of the Sunday Evening 
Choral Club (Orchestra Hall). 

Mr. O. Gordon Erickson has been with the First Church 
Choir since January 29, 1911. He is a member of the Faculty 
of the Chicago Musical College. Mr. Erickson is Director 
(1913) of the Sunday Evening Choral Club (Orchestra Hall). 

Mr. Francis S. Moore was brought up in the musical 
atmosphere of the First Church. His mother, Mrs. Alexander 
P. i\Ioore (formerly Miss Frances Silvey), was a member of 
the First Church Choir, in the "sixties." 

Mr. IMoore studied the organ with Mr. Clarence Eddy, 
when Mr. Eddy was organist of the Church (1879-1895). 
Later, Mr. ]\Ioore spent six months in Paris, studying with 

' From "The Continent," Januarj', 1913, by the Rev. William Pierson Merrill, D. D., 
formerly of the Sixth Presbyterian Church, Chicago, now of the Brick Presbyterian 
Church. N. Y. City. 



206 PULPIT AND CHOIR. 

Mr. Alexander Guilmant. He began his duties as organist of 
the First Church, May 31, 1896, and is now (1913) organist 
and director of the Choir of the present Church. 

The Choirmaster is greatly indebted to all others who 
have served in the Choir of the First Church and especially 
to Mrs. James C. Ames and Mr. Charles T. Atkinson for 
the interest they have taken in the Special Musical Services. 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 207 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS 

Great advances have been made in the character of 
Church music in this country during the past sixty years. Prior 
to 1850, all the support which Church societies could provide 
for the maintenance of their music, was to furnish the singers 
with hymn and tune books. Salaried Choirs and two-manual 
organs were almost unknown in the West. The tuning fork, 
flute and bass viol were the instruments commonly heard in 
the country districts. The melodeon, forerunner of the pres- 
ent cabinet organ, was just coming into use. 

A friend, residing in a country district of a neighboring 
state, to whom I wrote recently asking about hymn books and 
instruments, replied: 

"The impressions received of a village Choir in my child- 
hood may give you a fair idea of the character of the music 
commonly heard at that time in the Churches throughout the 
western states. My home (1846-1856) was in a farming 
community, close by a lovely village where the people worked 
hard, feared God and attended Church regularly. As I look 
back on that period of my life there are three things which 
come prominently to mind — the Sabbath, the village Church 
and its Choir. The Sabbath was at that time literally a day of 
rest, when every member of the household must cease all but 
the necessary farm work, and go to Church. To the young 
folks of the family, the day was something more. The Sun- 
day services and the meetings of the Choir for practice brought 
some relief into the hard, dull routine of farm life, and really 
gave us our only chance for meeting friends and learning 
something of the events going on in the great world outside. 

"The meeting house was a frame structure, built after the 
New England style — white exterior, green blinds, steeple and 
bell, the rope hanging in the vestibule. 

" *J\Ieeting' invariably began with a prayer by the Minis- 
ter, followed by the announcement of a hymn; then there 
would be a pause for the choir leader to find a tune. Some- 
times, after long and anxious waiting, the leader would rise 
from his place in the choir gallery at the opposite end of the 
Church and gravely request the ]\Iinister to change the hymn, 
as the meter of the hymn announced was unfamiliar to the 
Choir. A tune being found, the singers would take their pitch 
from the leader's tuning fork, each sounding the note of his 



20S A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 

or her part, the Do, Mi, Sol being heard distinctly through- 
out the Church. In 1850, we did not have the convenient hymn 
and tune book of later years, with the music at the top of the 
page and the words directly below. Each singer held a small 
book of hymns in the right hand and a cumbrous tune book 
in the other, and with eyes cast now on the leader, now on the 
words, now on the tune, made the best of this awkward 
arrangement. 

"For a long time, the only instrument used in the Choir 
was the leader's tuning fork. Some one came to the village 
after a while who played the flute; he was brought into the 
Choir. In this way, the bass viol and clarinet were added to 
the musical forces on the Sabbath. About 1855, we procured 
a melodeon. These innovations were not entirely regarded 
with favor by some of the people. The Minister of a neigh- 
boring Church occupied our pulpit one Sunday, and, as he 
arose to give out the first hymn, hearing some tuning and 
scraping in the direction of the choir gallery, asked the Con- 
gregation to stand while the Choir 'fiddle and sing the hymn !' 

'T have a distinct remembrance of the music heard at 
the funerals of that day. The hymns, 'Hark ! from the Tombs 
a Doleful Sound,' 'Wjhy Do We Mourn Departing Friends?' 
'Sister, Thou Wast Mild and Lovely,' and others, equally 
mournful in character, were favorites with the village Choir on 
these occasions. When we secured an organ, thirty years 
afterward, and the flute, violin, clarinet and bass viol had dis- 
appeared from the Choir gallery, the music, to my mind, lost 
much of its character." 

I have another letter from a dear old choir leader, Mr. 
A. R. Peck, of the First Presbyterian Church, of Beloit, Wis., 
written in much the same vein, telling of the books and in- 
struments used in his day. Mr. Peck made an address at the 
Semi-Centennial Celebration of his Church, March 21, 1899, 
speaking of his Choir recollections, which date from 1841. 
How he loved his work! The letter will speak for itself: 

"I am a farmer living on the farm my father bought 
fifty-eight years ago, three miles from the city of Beloit. I 
have traveled that distance day and night in all kinds of 
weather to gratify my love for music. For years I have never 
missed a Saturday night rehearsal, nor a Sunday service, 
morning or evening. It never stormed so hard, nor was the 
cold ever so severe, that I was kept at home." 

The first reference to music in the records of the First 




THE iil.l) MKETIXG HorSK 
Berlin Hoit;lits. Erie Cmmly. Ohin 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 209 

Church was in connection with the dedication, Januaiy 4, 
1834, of the frame meeting house, commonly known as the 
"Lord's House." A hymn was written for this occasion by 
Mr. G. T. Sproat, "a Baptist brother," from which I quote the 
first verse : 

"God of the glorious world above, 

Before Thy gracious throne we bow ; 
O send the spirit of Thy love. 

And smile upon Thy children now." 

The Chicago Daily Democrat of January 21, 1834, gives 
a full account of these services, with the sermon in full of Dr. 
Porter, and the other verses of the hymn. 

There was undoubtedly a Choir in those early days, judg- 
ing from a resolution adopted at a meeting of the Session, 
December 16, 1834: 

"In compliance with a request from the singers, it wras 
voted to advise the Congregation to stand during the singing 
and incline the head upon the bench before them during prayer 
in our public Avorship." 

The singing was led in the new Church by Sergeant Rich- 
ard Burtis, from the garrison, and the prayer meetings were 
led by the major, known as "good old Alajor Wilcox." The 
only other Choir members of this period (1834-1835), as far 
as I can ascertain, were Mr. Bates (violin) and Mr. James 
i\Iarshall (flute). We know nothing of the character of the 
music at this time; it was probably of the simplest kind. The 
Chicago Magazine of June, 1857, says : 

"The Choir in those days was the whole assembly; exclu- 
sive singers, with exclusive rights and exclusive seats, was 
an innovation on primitive worship reserved for later days." 

The frame meeting house, after its removal to the new 
location on Clark street south of Washington, was called the 
"Wooden Church," to distinguish it from the "Brick Church," 
which was erected later. 

While services were held in the "Wooden Church" (1837- 
49) the music was congregational in character, supported by a 
chorus, of which the first leader was ^Ir. Seth P. Warner. 
Mr. Augustus G. Downs succeeded ^Ir. Warner as leader 



210 A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 

(1841) and played the bass viol. Mr. Edward C. Cleaver/ 
who joined the Choir in 1845, wrote of his recollections: 

"I played the violoncello in the 'Wooden Church' until I 
purchased a double bass; this instrument I played until I re- 
signed in 1852. At the opening of the new Church, the music 
was led by Dr. Dunham,' at that time an accomplished singer. 
Mr. C. B. Nelson played the flute, and I the double bass. 
Among the ladies of the Choir were: Miss Langdon, Miss 
Sarah Downs, Miss Johnson and Miss Sarah Brookes. Miss 
Downs was at the time conducting a little school at the north- 
west corner of Madison and La Salle streets. I think Mr. 
Whitmarsh sang bass." 

Mrs. Lydia E. Downs^ says of the Choir at that time : 
"Mr. A. G. Downs probably joined the Choir of the First 
Church as early as 1841, and assisted sometimes as a singer 
and sometimes as a player of the violoncello. Other mem- 
bers of the Choir were: Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Downs, Mrs. 
William Saltonstall , her mother, Mrs. Aiken, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Seth P. Warner. I left the Church in 1849 when the Rev. 
Flavel Bascom was still pastor." 

Mrs. Oliver K. Johnson says : 

"My recollection of the Choir in the 'Brick Church' is 
very vague, though Mr. and Mrs. Fassett are strongly associat- 
ed in my mind among the members. The 'Wooden Church,' 
which stood at the south end of the lot, was entirely before my 
day, but Mrs. Freer has tried to give me the benefit of her 
memory. The Choir sat at the north end of the Church, fac- 
ing the Minister, and when they arose to sing, the people arose 
at the same time, turning around and facing the singers. The 
Choir was composed of all members of the Congregation who 
could sing, young and old, the young ladies being particularly 
welcome." 

With the completion of the "Brick Church" in 1849, the 
chorus still continued, accompanied by a few instruments, 
until 1852, when a melodeon was introduced. 

When we came to Chicago in February, 1857, the city 
still retained many features of the small town, though the 

' Mr. Cleaver died April 10, 1904, in Chicago. 

' Dr. Dunham (T.) was a member of the Musical Union in 1857, and occasionally 
conducted its rehearsals. He led the Choir in Calvary Presbyterian Church in 1863 
and 1864. 

' Mrs. Lydia E. Downs, wife of Mr. Myron Day Downs, died December 11. 1906, 
in Chicago. 






AlGlSTrS C.AV I)(>\VN> 




A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 211 

population numbered nearly 100,000. The music ordinarily 
heard on Sunday was but little better than that of the village 
Choir; this was certainly true of the Churches we attended 
during the two years following our arrival. There were not 
many organs, and the melodeon was the usual instrument for 
accompanying the singers. 

The volunteer chorus was, however, gradually giving 
way to the quartette. The First Presbyterian Church in- 
troduced a quartette with the occupation (1857) of the new 
building on Wabash Avenue. The reasons for abandoning the 
time-honored chorus, were many. There were always plenty 
of good voices, but good leaders and organists who could make 
the meetings for practice attractive and helpful for the singers, 
were scarce. The fact is, moreover, that even in large Con- 
gregations it is difficult to find a score of good singers who 
will bend to the task of regular attendance at rehearsals and 
services, year in and year out, however attractive and useful 
the exercises may be. The life of a metropolis is not con- 
ducive to such sacrifices. In early days, the Choir meeting was 
generally a social gathering, to which everybody came for the 
purpose of having a good time. The musical demand was 
easily satisfied. After the Choir had looked over the hymns 
for the next Sabbath and perhaps an occasional anthem or 
"set piece," the evening's work was done. 

In order to appreciate the character of Church music sixty 
years ago, we should know something of the Choir literature 
of that day. As late as 1870, the entire library of the average 
Choir consisted of tune and anthem books, such as "Carmina 
Sacra," by Lowell Mason, Boston (1849) ; 'The Shawm," by 
W. B. Bradbury and George F. Root, New York (1853) ; 
"Grace Church Collection," by W. A. King, New York (1853) ; 
"Church and Home," by George Leach, New York (1857), etc. 
In this respect, how richly blessed are the Choirs at the present 
day ! All the works of the best English and American writers 
can now be had in cheap octavo form, thus making the work 
of the Choir room grateful and instructive and adding dignity 
to the Sabbath services. The first publisher of octavo music at 
cheap prices was Alfred Xovello. In August, 1852, he opened 



212 A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 

a branch of his London house at No. 389 Broadway, New 
York City, in order to introduce cheap editions of the standard 
oratorios'and EngHsh Church music; but it was at least twenty 
years afterward before musicians generally realized the worth 
and convenience of the Novello publications. Choirs in the 
west for many years relied upon their tune and anthem books 
and sacred collections for the Sabbath worship. 

One of the best works in use fifty years ago was the col- 
lection (Boston, 1851), by Henry W. Greatorex, organist of 
Calvary Episcopal Church, New York City. A suggestion 
made in the preface of this book is worthy of careful con- 
sideration by ^linisters and music committees. Greatorex 
recommended : 

"Those in favor of Congregational singing, to use the same 
words to the same tunes invariably, and in a short time the as- 
sociation between the words and the music will enable the Con- 
gregation to sing most of the tunes." 

The tunes, "Bemerton" (C. M.), "Grostete" (L. M.), 
"Leighton" (S. M.), and "Seymour" (T's, arranged from 
Weber), now so well known, were written by Greatorex and 
first appeared in this book. Professor Thomas D. Seymour, of 
Yale College, answered my letter asking about Greatorex : 

"New Haven, October 33, 1898. 
"Greatorex's portrait represents him as a handsome, large- 
faced Englishman, with bushy black beard, a man of thirty-five 
or forty. The tune 'Seymour' was named for an uncle of 
mine who was a bass singer in Greatorex's Choir, just sixty 
years ago." 

The Connecticut Quarterly, Vol. 11, page 156, gives furth- 
er particulars : 

"Henry W. Greatorex came to the Center Church, Hart- 
ford, in 1838, and remained two years. He left the city for a 
time, but returned to play the organ in St. John's Church, 
where he remained several years. He came of a musical fam- 
ily. His father, Thomas Greatorex, was a highly educated 
and prominent musician, at one time organist of the Cathe- 
dral at Carlisle, and for twenty-seven years conductor of the 
so-called Ancient Concerts in London, after which he was 
appointed to succeed Dr. Cook as organist and master of the 
boys at Westminster Abbey." 




MKS SAMriil. MONTACTK FASSRTT. 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 213 

While reading Fowler's "Life of Dr. John B. Dykes" 
(London, 1897), whose hymn tunes are now used in nearly 
every part of the Christian world, I noticed the name of the 
Rev. Edward Greatorex appearing several times throughout 
the book. It occurred to me that possibly he might in some 
way be related to Henry W. Greatorex. In response to my 
inquiry, I received this letter: 

"Croxdale Rectory, Durham, England, March 14, 1899. 

"Henry Wbllington Greatorex was my brother and left 
England when I was a boy. I cannot verify the date, but 
think it was about 1838-40. He had been organist of St. 
^lary-le-bone Church in London, and after he left England we 
heard very little of him until his death at New Orleans, about 
1860. He was twice married and left several children. His 
second wife, Eliza Greatorex, was an accomplished artist. I 
know nothing of them and suppose they are either in the old 
continent or in America. He was born in 1813, the fifth son. 
I am the seventh. 

"i\Iy father was born in 1758, when George II and Handel 
were living. He knew Prince Charlie ('The Young Pretender') 
in Rome, and gave rise to the royal pun of the 'Prince Regent' : 
'Aly father is Rex, but you are a Greater Rex' (Greatorex). 
My father was conductor of the Ancient Concerts, and it was 
on the occasion of his having to leave the dinner table of the 
Prince and take his place in the orchestra before the King's 
arrival, that the pun was made. He was F. R. S. and F. L. S. 
(Felow of the Royal Society and of the Linnaean Society). 
He died at Hampton, July 18, 1821, aged seventy-three. 

"I am a minor canon of Durham, and was an intimate 
friend of Dr. Dykes, and now an old man of seventy-six. I 
am sorry I cannot give more details as to my brother's life, but 
he seemed to have disappeared from his family when he went 
to the States. I am yours faithfully, 

'"Edward Greatorex." 

Champlin's "Cyclopedia of Music and Musicians" says 
Henry W. Greatorex was bom at Burton-on-Trent, England, 
in 1811, and died at Charleston, South Carolina, September 10, 
1858. Before going to Charleston, Greatorex was organist at 
the Calvary Episcopal Church, New York City, w^here his 
popular "Collection of Church Music" was prepared for pub- 
lication. 



214 A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 

Mr. Henry Siegling, of Charleston, under date of June 
28, 1899, writes: ''Greatorex was organist of St. Philip's 
Church, the Jewish Synagogue and the Catholic Cathedral; 
died of yellow fever." 

Mr. Thomas P. O'Neale, also of Charleston, says : 

"Your favor of July 1, 1899, was duly receivad. I regret 
that my memory refuses to be refreshed about Prof. Greato- 
rex. I did not know him intimately, but have heard him play 
at St. Philip's. He died of yellow fever, September 10, 1858, 
as you have it. He was buried in St. Philip's Church Ceme- 
tery, directly opposite the church." 

Greatorex was in his time one of the best writers of 
Church music in America. He came to this country one 
year before Dudley Buck was born (1839). Greatorex's an- 
thems do not possess the wealth of detail and color which 
characterize the works of Buck and his followers; but his 
hymn tunes and chants will always find a place in the worship 
of the sanctuary. It was while a student (1865-68) in West- 
ern Reserve College,^ Hudson, Ohio, that I came to know 
Greatorex's music. Thomas Day Seymour of Western Re- 
serve (1871) (afterward professor of Greek in Yale College) 
and I were members of the Choir in St. Mark's Episcopal 
Church, Hudson, during our college days. Greatorex's an- 
them, "The Lord Is My Shepherd,' and his hymn tune, "Bem- 
erton," with the delicate bit of imitation in the third line for 
the soprano and tenor voices, were among the selections we 
loved best to sing. 

Mr. N. J. Corey of Detroit, in his article on "The Mak- 
ing of Music in the Churches," in the "Musician" of August, 
1899, says: 

"The ideal Choir is, of course, the well-trained chorus, 
with a quartette to lead. But the maintenance of such a Choir 
presents difficulties that are insurmountable to the average 
Church. There are two classes of Churches in which chorus 
Choirs may be found, and these at the two extremes of temporal 
prosperity : the wealthy Congregation that can afford to remun- 

1 An orchestra was organized in the college, in 1867, of which I was pianist and 
conductor. Among its members were, Dr. George G. Baker (afterward a noted artist), 
now of Denver, Colorado, first flute; the Rev Josiah Strong, D. D. (class of 1869), 
second flute, and Professor Thomas Day Seymour (class of 1870). double bass. Pro- 
fessor Seymour died December 31, 1907, in New Haven, Conn. 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 215 

erate the members of the chorus, and the struggling Church 
that is obliged to depend upon volunteers. In the latter case, it 
is very often necessary for the musical members of the Con- 
gregation to give fullest exercise to their spiritual grace, in or- 
der to overlook the lapses from musical grace in the Choir loft. 
'How is it,' said one Minister to another, 'that you are advo- 
cating a paid Choir, when I have always understood that you 
were opposed to paying for the singing of God's praises?' 

" 'VVell,' he answered, 'I find it will soon be necessary to 
pay the Congregation for coming to our services, if the volun- 
teer singers remain, and I think it will be cheaper to pay a 
Choir.' 

"This was not so badly put. Indeed, the vain and tortur- 
ing struggles of many volunteer Choirs (and some paid ones, 
for that matter), with nondescript anthems, implies a large 
amount of Christian patience and fortitude on the part of the 
pews." 

Is it any wonder, then, that Church committees, composed 
of men actively engaged with their own afifairs, should cast 
aside all sentiment and look at religious matters from their 
practical point of view? To a business man and his way of 
thinking, it was a plain proposition ; it is better by far to have 
four people who can sing well, than fifteen or twenty who 
cannot. If, to bring about this result, it cost a little money, it 
was no matter. So the Congregations in 1857 were calling for 
a new order of affairs in the choir gallery; they demanded 
better discipline and better singing. Thus the old time volun- 
teers were summarily sent to the rear, and the field was left to 
the regulars. 

Choir people are very sensitive and jealous of their rights. 
We must approach the subject of church music as Agag drew 
near to Samuel — "delicately." 

Regarding organs, as nearly as I can learn, St. James' 
Episcopal Church was the first in Chicago to have an organ. 

"The first organ in St. James' Church," Mr. C. R. Lar- 
rabee^ writes to me, "must have been built in 1838, probably 
by Henry Erben.^ In 1857, we contracted with Hall & La- 



> Mr. Charles Rollin Larrabee, for nearly fifty years identified with St. James' 
Episcopal Church, was bom at Ticonderoga. X. Y., February 17. 1825; came to Chi- 
cago in 1S44; died June 3, 1899. 

2 Mr. Henr\- Erben was bom in New York City in 1799, and died there in May, 
18S5. When a young man, he ser\-ed as a workman in the factor>- of Mr. Thomas Hall, 



216 A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 

bagh of Xew York, for an organ for our new Church, which 
was delivered in due time. My recollection is that it had 
thirty stops and two manuals. Mr. C. B. Nelson, for your so- 
ciety, contracted at the same time for a larger instrument." 

The First Unitarian Church, then at the northwest comer 
of Washington and Dearborn streets, had a one-manual organ 
with ten speaking stops, built in 1850 by Jardine & Son, of 
New York. This firm, in 1858, also furnished a two-manual 
instrument for the Third Presbyterian Church, then on West 
Washington street. 

St. Mary's Catholic Church, at the southwest corner of 
Wabash avenue and Madison street, had a one-manual organ, 
built early in the "fifties." 

Dr. Patton's Church, the First Congregational, then at the 
corner of West Washington and Green streets, had a two- 
manual organ. 

Under April 1, 1865, I find in my diary: 

"Visited the Second Presbyterian Church this morning. 
The organ has forty-six stops, three banks of keys and two 
octaves of pedal." 

This organ was set up in September, 1854, by Andrews 
& Son, Utica, N. Y., in the Second or "Spotted Church," 
then at the northeast corner of Wabash avenue and Washing- 
ton street. 

The first organ constructed for Chicago by the well known 
builder, Mr. W. A. Johnson, of Westfield, Mass., was a two- 
manual instrument in the Wabash Avenue M. E. Church, at 
the northwest corner of Wabash avenue and Harrison street. 
This Church was commenced July 13, 1857, finished and dedi- 
cated July 15, 1858. 

The organ in the Fourth Presbyterian Church has three 
manuals and thirty-three speaking stops, and was built in 1874 
by Johnson & Son, now the Emmons Howard Organ Co. 

In 1868, Dudley Buck came to Chicago from Hartford as 
organist of St. James' Episcopal Church, and, in 1870, W. A. 

an English organ builder; in 1824, he began business for himself in New York City. 
Mr. Erben's son, Rear Admiral Henry Erben, U. S. N., in a letter of October 6, 1899, 
says: "My father was one of the first to build Church organs in America. These in- 
struments can be found, monuments of his skill, from Montreal to Cuba. My brother 
followed him in business, but he died and the concern is not now in existence." 




)ri)Liiv buck:. 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 217 

Johnson built a three-manual organ for the Church. The old 
Hall & Labagh organ was sold to the Church of the Epiphany, 
and, in 1892, was rebuilt by Farrand & Votey of Detroit. I\Ir. 
Buck bought the house, 39 Cass street, for a home, to which 
he added a studio with a three-manual Johnson organ. Here 
he met his pupils, gave Sunday afternoon recitals and held 
rehearsals for his Choir. He had a small chorus, with a quar- 
tette consisting of Miss Heinrichs (S.), Miss Kate Van Wor- 
dragen (A.), Mr. Edward Schultze (T.), and Mr. Thomas G. 
Goodwillie (B.). In September, 1871, Mr. Frank T. Baird 
and I began a course of study in musical theory with Mr. 
Buck, meeting him semi-weekly in his studio. Our lessons 
were soon interrupted, as Mr. Buck was called east on concert 
engagements. During his absence came the great October fire, 
which destroyed his Church, home, organ, and valuable library, 
and ended our studies. 

Some of our vacation days are now passed in Hart- 
ford, Conn., a city rich in memories of authors, poets, and 
musicians. Here lived Charles Dudley Warner, Mark Twain, 
and Lydia Huntley Sigourney (1791-1865), for whom a tab- 
let was erected in Christ Episcopal Church. In this Church, 
there is a window given by the pupils and friends of Henry 
Wilson, the composer, who was organist of the Church 
(1855-1877). Harriet Beecher Stowe spent her early life in 
Hartford, in charge of a school, and here wrote the poem, 
"Still, Still with Thee," which we have used so often in 
our Church in Chicago, with Arthur Foote's music, ac- 
companied by flute, viola, harp and organ. Henry W. 
Greatorex, "for whose services," says Dr. "Walker in his his- 
tory of Center Church, "the organ silently waited many weeks," 
came (1838) from London, England, to Hartford as organist 
of Center Church (First Congregational). He was the au- 
thor of the "Gloria Patri in F" sung every Sunday in the 
First Church, and of many of the best tunes in our hymn books. 
Center Church contains a tablet in memory of the Rev. Joel 
Hawes,^ D. D., one of its Ministers, who declined a call in 
1836 from the First Presbyterian Church of Chicago. Frederic 
Grant Gleason, theorist and composer, born (1848) at Mid- 
dletown near Hartford, died in Chicago (1906), acquired his 
early musical education with Dr. Francis G. Barnett, organist 

1 "To the beloved memory of Joel Hawes, tenth Pastor of this Church; bom De- 
cember 22, 1789; installed March 4, 1818; died June 5, 1867. A vigorous, devoted 
and successful Minister of the Gospel of Christ." 



218 A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 

of Center Church. Hartford was the birthplace on March 10, 
1839, of one of America's foremost composers and organists — 
Dudley Buck; organist of Park Church from 1862 until 1868, 
when he came to Chicago ; died October 6, 1909, in Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Henry Wilson's music was much liked by Choirs in 
early days, his "Sacred Quartettes," "Gloria in Excelsis 
in B Flat" and "Te Deuni" being particularly grateful to 
lovers of quartette singing. The Travelers' Record (Feb- 
ruary, 1878), Hartford, Conn., contains an article on the 
life and work of Mr. Wilson, written by Mr. Charles Dud- 
ley Warner. Mr. Wilson was born December 2, 1828, in 
Greenfield, Mass., the birthplace also of Mr. Clarence Eddy. 
In August, 1854, Mr. Wilson went to Leipzig for a year's 
study with Plaidy and Moscheles, and on his return to 
America in 1855 was appointed organist and choirmaster of 
Christ Church, Hartford. His death occurred January 8, 
1878, in Hartford. 

The best organ in Chicago in 1857, and the one most used 
for concert purposes, was in St. Paul's Universalist Church, 
at the northwest corner of Wabash avenue and Van Buren 
street. The instrument was built by Mr. Henry Erben in 1855- 
56. It stood at the east end of the Church, had three manuals, 
and with its elaborate case made an imposing appearance. 

The first organ in the First Presbyterian Church was built 
by Hall & Labagh of New York City, for the edifice on Wa- 
bash avenue, and was completed and in readiness for the dedi- 
cation of the Church, October 15, 1857. The instrument had 
three manuals and thirty-eight stops. 

Messrs. E. & G. G. Hook of Boston, were not repre- 
sented in Chicago until 1862, when they built an organ with 
two manuals and twenty-eight stops for the New England 
Congregational Church. In 1868, this firm built a three-man- 
ual organ for Unity Church. 

There were not many organists in Chicago in 1856, if the 
word organist means a musician who is familiar with the 
mechanism and capabilities of the instrument, and has the 
musical education to exploit its possibilities. 




ARAH TILLINGHAST. 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 219 

j\Ir. W. H. Currie, an English organist, came here in 
1855, and was engaged in St. Paul's Universalist Church, re- 
maining there until the beginning of the war. "His style was 
that of the English Cathedral organist," says Mr. A. W. Dohn. 
"He was a good musician and a reliable player." Mr. Currie 
was succeeded at St. Paul's by his pupil, Miss Sarah Tilling- 
hast,'- daughter of Mr. W. A. Tillinghast, then teacher of music 
in the public schools. Miss Tillinghast afterward married Mr. 
A. O. Frohock, and removed to Boston, where she was well 
known as teacher and organist, and gave recitals for several 
seasons on the great organ in Boston Music Hall. The suc- 
cessors of Miss Tillinghast at St. Paul's Church were Mr. 
Charles Ansorge, Mr. Adolph Baumbach, and Mr. G. C. 
Knopfel. 

Mr. Ansorge came to Chicago in 1860-62, and for some 
years was instructor of music in the Chicago High School. He 
was a man of letters, a graduate of a German university, and 
a good musician. He was the first to tell me of Handel's "Mes- 
siah." Mr. Ansorge died of cholera in September, 1866, on a 
Sunday afternoon after having played at his Church in the 
morning as usual. 

Mr. Baumbach, well known as the author of a collection 
of Church music entitled "Baumbach's Sacred Motettes," came 
to Chicago in 1863, and succeeded Mr. Ansorge at St. Paul's 
Universalist Church. I think he went from St. Paul's to the 
New England Congregational Church, and that he remained 
there two or three years ; afterward he became organist of 
Grace Episcopal Church, beginning his work at the consecra- 
tion of the present edifice on Wabash avenue, near Fourteenth 
street, Easter Day, 1869. Mr. Baumbach continued at Grace 
Church until his death, in Chicago, April 3, 1880. 

When I first knew Mr. Knopfel, (1864), he was engaged 
in business and had been in Chicago a year or two. He first 
played at St. Paul's Universalist Church, and afterward at 
Trinity and St. James' Episcopal Churches. After the fire of 
1871, he was engaged at the Immanuel Baptist Church. 

> I am indebted to Mr. George P. Upton for the photographs of Mrs. Matteson, 
Miss Tillinghast, Dudley Buck, Hans Balatka and Edouard Remenyi. 



220 A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 

j\Ir. Knopfel died in Omaha, Nebraska, where he had 
resided for some years. The particulars of his death were very 
sad, as will appear in the following letter from Mr. Jules G. 
Lumbard : 

"Omaha, Nebraska, February 11, 1901. 

"Knopfel slipped on the steps of the house where he 
boarded, and was taken insensible to the Clarkson Hospital, 
where he died. I went to offer my services at the funeral, but 
was referred to the coroner, who v»'as also an undertaker. The 
coroner told me no provision had been made for a funeral, that 
the body lay in their vault; that Knopfel had no money and no 
friends, and that they were about to turn the body over to the 
Medical College. 

"Thereupon I went out among my friends, raised money 
with which to bury him, and had a friend go along to see that 
all was properly done. I bought the burial lot, paid the under- 
taker's charges and came away. It was all I could do." 

No money! No friends! Such was the pitiful end of 
one of the best organists we ever had in Chicago. I knew him 
well while he was here (1863-1876). He gave piano lessons 
to my sister (1861), and I shall always remember her delight 
in studying with him Liszt's "Hungarian Rhapsodies" and the 
"March" from Wagner's "Tannhauser." It was at his Church 
(St. Paul's) that I first heard Mendelssohn's organ sonatas. 
He was the first to suggest to me the use of violin, violoncello, 
harp, and other instruments with the organ. In 1865, he was 
married to Miss Hattie Brown Miller, the soprano in the Choir 
of St. James' Episcopal Church. She died soon afterward. Mr. 
Knopfel assisted Mr. Hans Balatka, director of the musical 
services at the funeral of Abraham Lincoln (1865), when the 
body lay in state at the Court House in Chicago. 

The first organist of the Second Presbyterian Church was 
Mr. Thomas Crouch (1854-56). His successor was Mr. H. W. 
Chant, afterward of the firm of Pilcher Bros. & Chant, organ 
builders. In reply to my inquiry about Mr. Chant, I have this 
letter from Henry Pilcher's Sons, now of Louisville, Ky., suc- 
cessors to Pilcher Bros. : 

"Louisville, Ky., June 16, 1899. 

"Mr. Chant was associated with the firm from March, 
1864, to February, 1866. They built the organ in the North 
Presbyterian Church ; completed September 15, 1865." 




HAXS HAI.ATKA. 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 221 

Mr. Chant introduced the first quartette Choir in the Sec- 
ond Church.^ 

Mr. Charles A. Havens followed Mr. Chant at the Second 
Church, and was succeeded by Mr. Daniel N. Hood, who con- 
tinued until 1881. Air. Hood at that time lived in Rockford, 
111., as director of music in Rockford College, but came to 
Chicago every week for his work at the Second Church. 
Dudley Buck's "Te Deum in B Flat" was dedicated to him. On 
leaving Chicago, Mr. Hood went to Woburn, Mass., as organ- 
ist of the First Congregational Church. His home is now 
(1913) in Ipswich, Mass. 

Mr. Havens returned to the Second Church in 1882, re- 
maining until 1890, when he was succeeded, December 1, 1890, 
by the present organist, Mr. A. F. McCarrell. 

One of the early organists was Mr. Emil Rein, who came 
here in 1855, as teacher of piano, Church organist, and con- 
ductor of a German singing society. He played for a time at 



* As to the membership of this quartette Choir, I have the following information: 
The soprano was Mrs. F. A. Thomas, who was afterward soprano in the First Church 
in 1865. She died, October 31, 1890, on the train coming from California. 

The alto was Mrs. Casandana ("Cassie") Matteson (nee Dyer). She was bom in 
Shaftsbur^-, Vt., in the early "thirties." She was married to Mr. Robert Matteson ,of 
the same place, and the young couple came to Aurora, 111., in 1854. Mr. Matteson en- 
tered the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Co. and they soon 
moved to Chicago. Mrs. Matteson possessed an alto voice of phenomenal range and 
quality, and strong musical temperament, and through her cousin, Mr. W. A. Tilling- 
hast, soon took a commanding position among the public singers of Chicago. She was 
engaged for the Second Presbyterian Church, where she remained till 1861. She then 
joined the Choir of Trinity Episcopal Church, but returned to the Second Presbyterian 
Church in 1865, remaining there until 1869, when she went to Melbourne, Australia. 
She was a member of the Choir in St. James' Catholic Church in Melbourne, and was 
well known as a concert singer in that city and in Sydney, appearing often with Ara- 
bella Godard, Carreno and other artists. She returned to Chicago and sang at a con- 
cert of the Mozart Club in Central Music Hall, May 12, 1885. Her voice was consider- 
ably impaired at this time, and this was her last appearance in public. 

Mr. E. B. Wright (now deceased), an old friend of the Matteson family, gave me 
many of the above facts regarding Mrs. Matteson. "On her return from Australia," 
said Mr. Wright, "she was very poor and in great need of assistance. Through the efforts 
of her friends we placed her in a sanitarium at Oshkosh, Wis., where she died July 16, 
1897. "After an interval of nearly fifty years, I cannot recall many singers with voice and 
style like that of "Cassie" Matteson. I went every Sunday night, when it was possible, 
to Trinity Church on Jackson street to hear her sing. 

Mr. Charles H. Seavems was the tenor of the quartette; died March 22, 1871, in 
Chicago. 

The bass was Mr. Henr>' Johnson, who remained with the Choir until he removed 
to New York City, where he is now (1900) living. 



222 A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 

Trinity Episcopal Church/ St. James' Episcopal Church, and 
last at the Church of the Messiah; died in this city in 1884. 

Mr. Theodore S. Payne was organist of St. James' Epis- 
copal Church in 1857, when Mrs. Emma G. Bostwick- came out 
from New York City to take a position in the Choir of that 
Church, remaining there until 1861, when he was succeeded by 
his brother, Mr. E. A. Payne. Later Mr. Payne was with the 
Church of the Ascension. His death occurred at Oak Park, 
Illinois, October 7, 1898. 

Mr. Adolph W. Dohn, the first organist of the First Pres- 
byterian Church, was born at Breslau, Silesia, in 1835; came 
to Chicago in the summer of 1857, and for a few months was 
organist at Dr. Patton's Church (First Congregational), going 
from there to the First Presbyterian, where he remained until 
the winter of 1859-60. Mr. Dohn organized the first quartette 
Choir in the history of the Church : Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Fas- 
sett (T. and S.), Miss Elizabeth Boyden (A.), and Mr. J. T. 
Jewett (B.). Although the Choir was in the immediate charge 

1 The comer stone of Trinity Church on Madison street, was laid on Wednesday, 
June 5, 1844. The first services were held August 25, 1844. The edifice on Jackson 
street was consecrated June 16, 1861. A lady, now residing in the East, who was a 
member of the Choir of the First Presbyterian Church early in the "forties," and after- 
ward sang in the Choir of Trinity Church, answered my inquiry as to the organ of 
that Church: 

"About Trinity Church, my memory is more distinct, as I became a member of 
it in 1847, under Bishop Philander Chase, the Rev. W. W. Walker being the first Rector. 
The Choir in the new wooden Church on Madison street was in a gallery over the en- 
trance, and was conducted by George Davis, Esq., a fine tenor singer. Among the 
volunteers were C. RoUin Larrabee, Miss Dix, Miss Haight, and myself. There was 
neither organ nor any other instrument in the first years of Trinity Church, but about 
1849 the place of the Choir was changed to the back of the Church, and a small organ 
was put in, with a single bank of keys." 

2 Mrs. Emma Gillingham Bostwick, the best soprano soloist of her day in Chicago, 
was bom in Philadelphia. She commenced her career at a concert of the Handel and 
Haydn Society in Boston in 1828, when she was hardly sixteen years old. In 1836, 
she married Mr. Charles J. Bostwick, who died in 1853. Mrs. Bostwick sang in con- 
cert at Niblo's Garden, New York City, soon after its opening, and in 1853, she appear- 
ed with the New York Philharmonic Society. In the autumn of 1857, Mrs. Bostwick 
came to Chicago to take a position in the Choir of St. James' Church, remaining there 
several years until a new Choir was organized for Trinity Episcopal Church, then on 
Jackson street, when Dr. Cummings was its Rector. The other members of this Choir 
were Mrs. Cassie Mattison (A.), Mr. Charles H. Seaverns (T.) and Mr. Jules G. Lum- 
bard (B.). Mrs. Bostwick sang on a number of occasions, in the Church of the Holy 
Communion, a small wooden building on the east side of Wabash avenue, south of 
Lake street, when the Rev. John Sebastian Bach Hodges was Rector and Miss Faustina 
Hasse Hodges had charge of the music. After her return in 1866 to the east, Mrs. 
Bostwick resided in New York City until 1870, when she removed to Morristown, 
N. J., residing there until she died, December 31, 1894, aged eighty-one. 




MRS. CASAXDAXA T'CASSIE") MATTESOX. 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 223 

of Air. Fassett, Mr. Dohn interested himself much in its af- 
fairs, and they were occasionally assisted at the Sunday serv- 
ices by members of the Mendelssohn Society, of which Mr. 
Dohn was then conductor, in selections from the works of 
Mendelssohn and other composers. This class of music did 
not prove altogether acceptable to some of the Congregation, 
and the use on one Sunday of "How Lovely Are the Messen- 
gers" ("St. Paul"), threatened to sever all relations between 
organist and Alusic Committee. On leaving the First Church, 
]\Ir. Dohn was engaged at Unity Church (Rev. Robert CoU- 
yer's), and later at the Westminster (Fourth Presbyterian), 
remaining there until Prof. Swing resigned the pastorate of 
the Fourth Church to commence (1879) his new work in Cen- 
tral Music Hall. He organized the Mendelssohn Society in 
1857 ; conducted the concerts of the Apollo Musical Club dur- 
ing its first two seasons (1872-74). Mr. Dohn and Miss Pau- 
line King Johnson were married November 13, 1862, in the 
First Church by the Rev. Robert W. Patterson, D. D., of the 
Second Presbyterian Church. Mr, Dohn died February 26, 
1901. My diary of February 28 has this note in regard to 
the funeral, held at his home, 165 Locust street: 

"Sprague and I went together at 2 :30 P. M. Among those 
present were Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Hamill, Mr. Theodore 
Thomas and Mr. Henry Greenebaum. Mr. George P. Upton 
gave an address on the life and work of our leader, in which 
he spoke of Dohn's stern honesty and sincerity in everything 
which pertained to his art," 

Mr. Dohn's successor, Mr. Horace G. Bird,^ came to Chi- 
cago in October, 1859, and was organist of the First Church 
from 1860 until 1869. Though the Treasurer's books of the 
Church were destroyed in the fire of 1871, I have ascertained 
the names of all who were in the Choir from 1860 to 1871. In 
1865 the members were Mrs. F. A. Thomas (S.), Miss Lizzie 

1 Mr. Horace Grant Bird was bom September 3, 1837, at Watertown, Mass. In 
1858, he removed to Cleveland, Ohio, where he resided one year, engaged in musical 
work. He came to Chicago in 1859, and was tenor in the Choir of the Second Presby- 
terian Church. Mr. and Mrs. Bird were received into membership of the First Church. 
June 27, 1S64. In later years, he was organist at the Olivet Presbyterian Church, 
Church of the Messiah, Trinity Episcopal, Trinity Methodist, Christ Reformed, and 
Plymouth Congregational Churches; died in Chicago, April 7, 1897. His brother, 
Mr. Arthur Bird, an able writer for the voice, piano, and orchestra, resides in Berlin, 
Germany. 



224 A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 

Farrell (A.), Mr. Edward Schultze^ (T.), and Air. Thomas G. 
Goodwillie- (B.). Mr. Nicholas Cawthorne, at one time di- 
rector of music in the Western Female College of Evanston, 
was organist during the temporary absence of Mr. Bird. Mr. 
Cawthorne had but one leg ; nevertheless he managed the pedals 
and couplers with remarkable ease. 

Other members of the Choir from 1860 to 1871 were : 

Sopranos : Mrs. S. M. Fassett and Miss Frances A. Root.^ 
Altos : Miss Frances Silvey, now Mrs. Alexander P. 
Moore, mother of Mr. Francis S. Moore, who has been organist 
of the First Church since 1896 ; Miss Susan Bird, sister of Mr. 
Horace G. Bird; Miss Eliza Davis (afterward Mrs. L. M, 
Prentiss), daughter of Mr. George Davis, an early Choir 
leader in Chicago. 

Tenors : Mr. E. Ward, Mr. S. M. Fassett, Mr. Lewis M. 
Prentiss who was one of the first members of the Apollo Mu- 
sical Club and who died in Chicago, December 6, 1896. 

Basses: Mr. Jules G. Lumbard* and Mr. W. N. Smith 
(died at South River, Md., March 18, 1899). His daughter. 
Miss Eleanor Smith, is a successful writer of songs and resides 
in Chicago. 

The Choir in November, 1868, when Dr. Mitchell began 
his ministry, was a quartette directed by Mr. Bird; but a few 
months later a chorus was introduce*d, under the direction of 
Mr. J. W. Adams. From 1869 to October, 1871, the organists 



' Mr. Edward Schultze was afterward with the Choir of the Church of the Messiah, 
during the Ministry of the Rev. Robert Laird CoUyer; then going to St. James' Epis- 
copal Church. In 1876-77. he was with the Choir of Trinity Episcopal Church. When 
the first edition of this history appeared (1900), Mr. Schultze was living in N. Y. City. 

' Mr. Goodwillie died in Chicago, April 3, 1896, aged fifty-eight. He was well 
known in concert work; sang with the Oratorio Society (1870) in Haydn's "Creation," 
under the direction of Mr. Hans Balatka; member of the Choir of St. James' Episcopal 
Church (1870); later with the Choir of Christ Reformed Episcopal Church. 

' Miss Frances A. Root was a successful teacher of the voice, and member of the 
Fortnightly and Amateur Musical Clubs. In 1870, she was with the Choir of Grace 
Episcopal Church. Miss Root was a sister of Dr. George F. Root, and aunt of Mr. 
Frederick W. Root, the well known vocal teacher; died in Chicago, Februarj' 9, 1905. 

* On the steps of the old Court House in Chicago, in 1861, with the ink scarcely 
dry on the pages of the manuscript, Mr. Lumbard sang George F. Root's war song, 
"The Battle Cry of Freedom." I remember the occasion, the singer and the enthu- 
siasm the song created. President Lincoln and General Grant declared that the sing- 
ing of the war songs by Jules and Frank Lumbard, brought 20,000 men to the Union 
cause. Mr. Lumbard was bom April 18, 1831, in Honeoye Falls, Monroe County, 
New York; died October 14, 1912, in Chicago. 




JII.ES G. I.IMHAKI) 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 225 

succeeding Mr. Bird were ]\Ir. Frank T. Baird,^ Dr. Louis 
Falk/ and Dr. J. E. Oilman.^ 

Upon the resignation of Mr. Adams, the Choir was placed 
in charge of Mr. S. M. Fassett. On the night of the great fire, 
October 8, 1871, services were held in the Church, conducted 
by Dr. Mitchell, assisted by a chorus Choir, of which the prin- 
cipal members were Mr. and Mrs. S. ^I. Fassett and Mr. John 
R. Rickey* (T.), Dr. J. E. Oilman (O.). 

I now present a short summary of the Choir leaders prior 
to 1857: 

Mr. Seth Porter Warner was received into the member- 
ship of the Church, September 13, 1838, and led the Choir for 
several years. Mr. and ]\Irs. Warner were dismissed by letter 
March 2, 1853, to the Second Presbyterian Church. Warner's 
Hall, which stood before the great fire on Randolph street, east 
of Clark, was named for him. Mr. Warner died in Chicago, 
June 12, 1892, at the age of eighty-three. 

Mr. Elisha Clark became a member of the Session in 1846, 
and, in 1850, led the Choir. He was a pioneer in the furniture 
trade and one of the first to introduce machinery in its manu- 
facture; died July 23, 1853, in Chicago. His son, the Rev. 
William Willis Clark, was (1900) Secretary of the Interna- 
tional Sunday Observance League. 

Mr. Augustus Gay Downs led the Choir in 1841. He was 
received April 5, 1845, into the membership of the Church. 
Mr. Downs was a merchant in the early days of Chicago; in 
1855 he was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Church. 
The violoncello played by Mr. Downs in the Choir is now in 
the study of the Church, a present from his son, Mr. Augustus 
H. Downs. ]\Ir. Augustus G. Downs died October 25, 1878, in 
Chicago. 

Dr. Warren N. Dunham (T.) led the Choir at the dedica- 
tion of the "Brick Church" in September, 1849. In 1862, when 

' Mr. Baird was bom in Worcester, Mass.: studied the organ there with Mr. B. D. 
Allen; while still a young man he came to Chicago, continued the study of organ with 
Mr, Dudley Buck; later with Mr. Clarence Eddy. He studied the piano with Mr. 
Alfred H. Pease and Mr. Emil Liebling. Mr. Baird was organist of the Third Presby- 
terian Church (1869-1892); now (1913) resides in Chicago. 

2 Dr. Louis Falk came to Chicago in 1862; was organist of the Church of the Holy 
Name (1863-1865). After two years' study in Europe, at Cassel and Leipzig, he re- 
turned to Chicago, and was organist of the First Church (1869); later with Unity 
Church (1870-1871), when the Rev. Robert Collyer was its Minister; with the Union Park 
Congregational Church (1871-1896). Since 1897, he has been with the First Congre- 
gational Church, Oak Park, Illinois. 

^ Dr. J. E. Oilman is a practicing physician and resides (1913) in Chicago. 

* Mr. John R. Rickey died in 1884, in Chicago. 



226 A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 

I first knew Dr. Dunham, he had charge of the Choir at St. 
JMary's Roman Catholic Church, then at the corner of Aladison 
street and Wabash avenue. Miss NelHe Conkey, now Airs. W. S. 
Crosby, was organist, and Air. H. P. Danks, the composer, was 
bass soloist in this Choir. Dr. Dunham organized a quartette 
Choir for Calvary Presbyterian Church in 1863. In 1899, he 
was Minister of the South Congregational Church at Cheyenne, 
Wyoming. On August 11 of that year, he wrote to me: "I 
shall be seventy-seven years old on the 20th of November, 
next. I preach twice every Sunday and take part in the Sun- 
day-school." Dr. Dunham died July 15, 1908, in Cheyenne. 

Mr. Samuel Montague Fassett came to Chicago from 
Galena, Illinois, and opened a photographer's studio in 1854 at 
the corner of Lake and Clark streets. Mr. and Mrs. Fassett 
were received into the membership of the First Church, Janu- 
ary 4, 1856. The musical interest of the Congregation centered 
largely in them at that time, especially Mrs. Fassett,^ who was 
very popular. In 1871, Mr. Fassett's studio, was at the corner 
of Wabash avenue and Van Buren street. After the fire of 
October, 1871, he started again in the building on Wabash 
avenue, south of Eldredge court. In 1873, Mr. and Mrs. Fas- 
sett moved to Washington, D. C, where they opened a studio, 
which was famous for the celebrities who made it their head- 
quarters. In 1889, Mr. Fassett was appointed government 
photographer by President Harrison; died in Washington, 
August 2, 1910. 

SURVIVING MEMBERS OF THE CHOIR PRIOR TO 1857. 

Aliss Sarah Aiken, now Mrs. William Saltonstall, of 
Plainfield, N. J. 

Miss Sarah Brookes. 

Miss Zanana S. Dickey, now resides in Evanston, 111. 

Miss Eliza A. Johnson, now Mrs. J. T. Temple. 

Mrs. Edward M. Goodrich. 

Mr. James P. Root, now resides in Chicago. 

OTHER MEMBERS OF THE CHOIR PRIOR TO 1857. 

Mr. and Mrs. Brayton Aiken. 

Mr. Bates (flute), received into the membership of this 
Church, March 11, 1841. 

Mr. Oscar L. Beach (flute), died at Nashville, Tenn. 

' Mrs. Cornelia Adele Fassett was bom, November 9, 1831, in Owasco, N. Y. 
After she came to Chicago with Mr. Fassett in 1854, she began to show marked artis- 
tic talent. Mr. and Mrs. Fassett went to Paris in 1868, remaining two years for seri- 
ous study. Her best piece of work is the painting entitled "The Electoral Commis- 
sion," the property of the Government, hanging in the Capitol. Mrs. Fassett died in 
Washington, D. C. January 4. 1898. 




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A Ml" HI. M I'ASSKTT 



A CHAPTER ON CHOIRS. 227 

Gen. Theodore F. Brown (T.), son of Mr. William H. 
Brown; member of The Apollo Musical Club (18T6-1877) ; 
died December 22, 1909, in Chicago. 

Mr. Edward C. Cleaver (double bass), died April 10, 
1904, in Chicago. 

Mr. Abel Sidney Downs, died June 30, 1883, in Chicago. 

Mrs. Abel Sidney Downs (formerly Miss Lucy Ogden), 
died January 5, 1902, in Chicago. 

Miss Margarette Clarkson, afterward Mrs. Louis de Vill- 
iers Hoard, died August 31, 1910, at Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Mr. Louis de Villiers Hoard (flute) of Shortall & Hoard, 
abstracts of title (1864-1873), died at Ogdensburg, N. Y., 
March 4, 1893. 

Miss Sarah Downs, afterward Mrs. Edwin Moore, died 
March 11, 1894. 

Miss Hoyt, deceased. 

Mrs. Harlowe Kimball, deceased. 

]\Iiss Langdon. 

Mr. James Marshall (flute). 

Mr. Claudius B. Nelson (flute), died March 29, 1885. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elijah Smith; Mr. Smith died July 15, 1879. 

Miss Eliza Smith, afterward Mrs. Volney Turner. 

Miss Mary Smith. 

Miss Raymond, sister of Mr. B. W. Raymond, afterward 
Mrs. T. B. Carter. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Wilbur; Mr. Wilbur died 
December 25, 1887 ; Mrs. Wilbur died January 31, 1895. 

Mrs. Dollivar Walker. 

Mrs. Seth P. Warner. 

Mr. T. C. Whitmarsh. 



228 JEREMIAH PORTER. 

JEREMIAH PORTER, FOUNDER 

The Rev. Jeremiah Porter was born in Hadley, Mass., 
December 27, 1804. He came of a lineage which represented 
the best famihes in that commonwealth. His grandfather, 
Hon. Samuel Porter, married Susanna, a granddaughter of 
Jonathan Edwards, the elder, "one of the brightest lumina- 
ries," says Robert Hall, "of the Christian Church, not ex- 
cluding any country or age, since the apostolic, and by whose 
death Calvinism lost its ablest defender." Jeremiah Porter 
was educated at Hopkins Academy and Williams College, 
entering Williams in the same class with David Dudley Field. 
In the year ahead of him, were Mark Hopkins and Brainerd 
Kent, our "Father Kent,"^ who founded Railroad Mission. 
Mr. Porter was graduated in 1825, and in the same year 
entered Andover Theological Seminary. Doubting if he 
was called to the ministry, he left the Seminary after two 
years, and in the spring of 1828 took charge of a high school 
in Troy, N. Y. He entered Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary in 1830, and in the autumn of 1831, after graduation, 
was ordained at the request of the American Home Missionary 
Society, as a Missionary Evangelist. In November, he began 
his missionary work at Fort Brady, Sault Ste. Marie, Michi- 
gan Territory, holding a revival in the fort and town, and 
organizing a Church of five members, which soon increased 
to thirty-three. 

The Home Missionary for May, 1832, contains an article 
by young Porter, giving some experiences of pioneer life at 
Fort Brady, with an account of his journey from the East 
and the primitive conveyances in use at that time. After 
eight days and nights of continuous travel, he reached De- 
troit (Fort Gratiot), only to wait another ten days for a 
vessel going up the lakes. Seven days more were consumed 
in going to ]\Iackinac, where he was again "held up," (the 
last vessel for the season having gone) until a canoe was 
sent for him from the Sault. In this frail craft, propelled 

> The Rev, Brainerd Kent was bom in Dorset, Vt., April 25, 1802; died in 
Chicago, January 29, 1888. 




lEREMIAH PORTER — FOUNDER. 



JEREMIAH PORTER. 229 

by two French boatmen, whose language he could not speak, 
with a black man for a companion, in bitter cold weather, 
the last ninety miles of his voyage were accomplished. 

In later life, Mr. Porter often spoke of the long voyage 
in May, 1833, when he accompanied the troops, under the 
command of Major Fowle, from the Sault Ste. Marie to Fort 
Dearborn. He dwelt with pleasure on his recollections of 
a little child, then only a year and a half old, the daughter 
of Major Fowle, who helped to brighten his tedious trip. 
"It was her mother," says Dr. Mitchell, "who may be said 
to have brought to this place the founder of its first Chris- 
tian Church, or at least to have been the right hand helper 
of the pioneer." Forty years after that voyage, when Mr. 
Porter was in Boston, a lady sought him out and asked him 
if he were the Minister who accompanied Major Fowle and 
the troops to Chicago in 1833. Learning that he was, she 
replied : "Do you remember the little girl that was on board ? 
I am that little girl." She became the wife of Mr. Henry 
F. Durant of Boston, and at that time (1873), she and her 
husband were engaged in the generous enterprise of founding 
Wellesley College. 

The Rev. Jeremiah Porter organized the First Presby- 
terian Church, of Chicago, in the capacity of a Missionary 
Evangelist, representing the American Home Missionary 
Society, but never having been installed, he could not be prop- 
erly called its first Minister. The First Presbyterian Church, 
founded by him on June 26, 1833, is the oldest religious Society 
in Chicago — older than the town of Chicago, which was not 
incorporated until August 10, 1833. Mr. Porter aided the 
Baptists in starting their first Society, October 19, 1833, and 
gave the use of the Presbyterian meeting house to the Episco- 
palians for the organization of St. James' Church in Octo- 
ber, 1834.1 



1 The records of St. James' Episcopal Church show that its first ser\-ice "was held 
in the Presbyterian Church on October 12, 1834. by the Rev. Palmer Dyer. The Rev. 
Isaac Hallman, who had been sent out to this western land by the Domestic Board of 
Missions, arrived in Chicago on the evening of October 12, and preached his first ser- 
mon in the Baptist Church at Franklin and South Water streets, the following Sun- 
day, October 19. On October 26, 1834. the parish was organized in an unfinished 
frame building on North Water street, near the Dearborn street drawbridge." 



230 JEREMIAH PORTER. 

During the first two years of its existence, the infant 
Church was more or less dependent on the Home [Missionary 
Society for its support, Mr. Porter's position being that of 
stated supply. His whole life seems to have been consecrated 
to missionary work on the frontier, organizing Churches and 
planting the good seed in carefully selected places, leaving 
to others the care and management and gathering of the fruit. 
And what a goodly heritage has come down to us ! 

In 1835, Dr. Porter accepted the call to the Main Street 
Presbyterian Church. Peoria, III, where he felt there was 
great need for the preaching of the Gospel. Dr. Porter's 
next pastorate was in Farmington, Fulton County, 111., where 
he labored until the spring of 1840, and then accepted a call 
to the Presbyterian Church of Green Bay, Wis., remaining 
there eighteen years. From Green Bay, he came, in 1858, to 
the Edward's Congregational Church of Chicago. 

Mr. Henry W. Dudley in his address (Memorial Service, 
1904) on the life of Dr. Porter, said : 

"I speak of Dr. Porter from two standpoints ; first, from 
my afifection for him as the founder of this Church, with which 
I have now been connected some forty years ; and second, from 
the fact, that when I felt it my duty to enlist as a soldier in 
the Civil War, I found to my suprise on going into the field 
that the Rev. Jeremiah Porter was Chaplain of the Regiment, 
to which my company (B), of Taylor's Battery, had been as- 
signed. His relation to our company was especially intimate, 
as he had a son, James W. Porter, now a member of this 
Church, and a nephew, Harmon T. Chappell, in our ranks." 

I cannot give a better account of the noble services of 
Dr. and Mrs. Porter in the Sanitary and Christian Com- 
missions during the Civil War than by quoting the words of 
Dr. Barrows, in his sermon at the Jubilee Services in 1883 : 

"Dr. and Mrs. Porter joined the army for service in the 
field at Cairo, in March, 1868, and labored in the hospitals 
at Cairo, Mound City, Pittsburg Landing, Memphis, and Vicks- 
burg. Dr. Porter entered \*icksburg on July 6, 1863, and 
helped bury the dead found in the hospitals. During the 
next winter, he ministered to the Presbyterian Church in Vicks- 
burg, and served in the city hospitals, while Mrs. Porter fol- 
lowed with sanitary stores the army corps in Tennessee and 
Alabama. Dr. Porter joined his wife under Kennesaw Moun- 



JEREMIAH PORTER. 231 

tain, and passed the summer of 18G4: at ^Marietta, Ga., until 
the capture of Atlanta, ministering to the wants of the sick 
and wounded of our army, and also to the needs of the Con- 
federate prisoners. Five of the Confederate officers and 
twenty of the Confederate soldiers gave to Mrs. Porter certifi- 
cates testifying to her great kindness to them, and asking like 
kindness to her, if she should ever become a prisoner. Dr. 
and Mrs. Porter were at Savannah a few days after General 
Sherman made a Christmas gift of that city to the nation. After 
the surrender of Lee, they went to Washington to labor with 
the troops there, and, later, accompanied General Logan's 
army to Louisville, Ky., and remained with that corps till 
July 3L 1865. Later in the year, Dr. Porter was sent by 
the United States Christian Commission to the troops on the 
Rio Grande, who were ordered there to protect our border 
from the aggressions of France under the Emperor Maximilian. 
Mrs. Porter was sent there at the same time with supplies, 
by the North West Sanitary Commission. Their work with 
the troops having been accomplished, and the Rio Grande 
Seminary having been revived by Mrs. Porter, they were called 
to Chicago in the spring of 1866. That year. Dr. Porter ac- 
cepted the call to the Congregational Church at Prairie du 
Chien. Wis., and in 1868. he became pastor of the Presbyterian 
Church in Brownsville, Tex., and with his wife and the Misses 
Grant of Chicago, took charge of the Rio Grande Seminary. 
In 1870, Dr. Porter was appointed by the United States Senate, 
Post Chaplain, U. S. A., at Fort Brown, and officiated there 
until 1873. He was then transferred to Fort Sill, Indian 
Territory, and in 1875, to Fort Russell, Wyoming Territory. 
He was retired from service by act of Congress, June 30, 
1882. Few lives have been as eventful and useful as those 
here sketched. There are multitudes on earth and in heaven 
who call them blessed." 

Dr. Porter's last days were quietly passed in the home 
of his beloved daughter at Beloit, Wis., where he died on 
July 25, 1893, in the ninetieth year of his age. At the funeral 
services, held in the College Chapel, Pastor Hamlin preached 
from the text of Dr. Porter's first sermon in Fort Dearborn: 
"Herein is my Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit" (St. 
John XV : 8), a text happily illustrated by the fruitful life of 
this beloved, successful missionary. 



232 JOHN BLATCHFORD. 

JOHN BLATCHFORD, FIRST MINISTER 

It has been my privilege, in recent years, to spend a few 
weeks every summer in Bridgeport, Conn., where there are 
two old Churches which have always interested me; the South 
Congregational, from which the Rev. Daniel Lord, D. D., came 
in 1869 to the pulpit of the Calvary Presbyterian Church, and 
the North Congregational, from which the Rev. John Blatch- 
ford, D. D., was called seventy-eight years ago, to be the 
Minister of the First Presbyterian Church, Chicago. 

There were two Blatchfords associated with the Congre- 
gational Church of Bridgeport (or Newfield, as the city was 
in former times called), the Rev. Samuel Blatchford, Minister 
from 1797 to 1804, and his son John, Minister from 1830 to 
1836. In the chapel of the North Church, are portraits of all 
the Ministers, and in the Church proper, memorial windows 
for Ministers, officers, and members who have been associated 
with the Church life since its organization in 1695. The por- 
traits of Samuel and John Blatchford and a memorial window 
were contributed by John Blatchford's son, Mr. E. W. Blatch- 
ford of our city, for the Celebration in 1895 of the 200th 
Anniversary of the Church. 

John Blatchford, born in Bridgeport (1799), educated at 
Princeton, and having served, as a faithful Minister, the old 
Church in Bridgeport for six years, was still a young man, 
say thirty-seven, when the call came to him from the West. 
It needed strong faith and much courage in that day for an 
educated, refined man to leave the comforts of life in the 
East, and with a family, undertake pioneer work on the 
frontier, leaving the associations and traditions of a Church 
already one hundred and fifty years old, and to begin life 
anew, as it were, with new Church surroundings on the prairies 
of Illinois. The young Minister having decided that his future 
work was in the West, started with his family on the journey 
from Connecticut to Illinois, a journey characterized by some 
peculiar hardships. How they reached Detroit, I cannot say; 
but in that city they took passage on the brig "Erie" and came 
through Lakes Huron and Michigan, in September, 1836, only 




)I1\ 1 

in the 



JOHN DLATCHFORD. 233 

to reach Chicago in a furious storm and meet shipwreck oflF 
the foot of Madison street. 

Let us consider now some of the conditions of life in 
Chicago in 1837. In 1833, when Jeremiah Porter organized the 
First Presbyterian Church in Fort Dearborn, the entire popula- 
tion consisted of the troops in the garrison with a few traders 
and settlers on the outside, possibly three hundred people in 
all. I recall an Old Settlers' reception at the Calumet Club 
some thirty years ago and hearing Hon. John Wentworth say 
that on New Year's day, 1837, he took a sleigh, with two 
horses and called upon all the married people in the settle- 
ment. The population had increased in 1837, when Dr. Blatch- 
ford began his labors, to perhaps three thousand. The Church 
at that time was still holding services in a frame structure, 
known throughout the settlement as the "Lord's House," situ- 
ated on the southwest corner of Lake and Clark streets. 

After the departure of Dr. Porter in 1835, earnest efforts 
were made to secure a Minister, among others a call being sent 
to the Rev. Joel Hawes, D. D., of Hartford, Connecticut. On 
receipt of the letter, Dr. Hawes went to Judge Williams of that 
city to ask, "where is this place, 'Chick-a-go' ? I have a call 
to go out there and preach." On being told that "Chick-a-go" 
was in a swamp back of Lake Michigan, he thought it best to 
decline the call. How little did the old conservative East, in 
their comfortable homes, realize in 1837 the possibilities of 
the mighty West! Hartford had at that time a population of 
perhaps 10,000, Bridgeport the same. Today Bridgeport has 
102,000, Hartford has 98,000, while we have two millions and 
many other things for which we consider life worth living. 

On December 25, 1836, Miss Frances L. Willard, an early 
teacher in Chicago, wrote to a friend in the East : 

"We have prospects of a ^Minister at last. The Rev. Mr. 
Blatchford, from some town near New York City, has received 
■a call, has not accepted it, but will preach here this winter. 
Thirty thousand dollars are subscribed for the erection of a 
meeting house to be built of marble, but not finished under 
two years. "^ 



Andreas' Histon' of Chicago, Vol. 1. page 301. 



234 JOHN BLATCHFORD. 

Dr. Blatchford, as we have seen, started West in 1836, 
and after a brief stay in Chicago, went to Jacksonville, Illinois, 
where he filled for that winter the office of President of Illinois 
College. While in Jacksonville, he received a call from the 
First Presbyterian Church in Chicago, which he accepted and 
was installed as its tirst Minister, on July 1, 1837. All 
thoughts the people may have entertained about the erection 
of a Church "to be built of marble" were soon dispelled by the 
financial depression of 1837. The frame meeting house on 
the rear of the lot at the southwest corner of Lake and Clark 
streets, a little north of the Sherman House, was in 1837-8 
removed to the rear part of the lot on the southwest corner 
of Clark and Washington streets, the present site of the Chi- 
cago Opera House. Diagonally from this corner, on the site 
of Bryan Hall of later days, was the parsonage built for Dr. 
Blatchford, called from its color, the "yellow cottage," a 
modest story and a half structure, afterward enlarged to pro- 
vide a study and library for the Minister. 

In those early days, the Minister's work was essentially that 
of laying the foundations for the future civic and religious life 
of this great city and in moulding into some proper form the 
various elements that came pouring in. During his entire minis- 
try of two years. Dr. Blatchford gave himself up to the preach- 
ing of the Word, with a zeal which consumed his vital forces 
and materially shortened his life. His practical preaching, 
combined with faithful pastoral work, resulted in a revival in 
the winter of 1838-9, which extended to the other Churches of 
the North and West sides. 

The following incident will illustrate the character of the 
duties of a Minister in that early day. In company with Elder 
Benjamin W. Raymond, on February 19, 1838, Dr. Blatch- 
ford went in a sleigh to Mechanics' Grove, about thirty-five 
miles northwest of Chicago in Lake County, for the organiza- 
tion of a Church. They crossed the Desplaines river on the 
ice, at which point, with kindly solicitude, they were met by 
Elisha Clark, of Mechanics' Grove, and were guided by him 
safely over the intervening prairie. 

Another illustration of the work needed in founding 



JOHN B LATCH FORD. 235 

Presbyterian Churches in a new country, is afforded in a letter 
from a pioneer Alinister who recalls the scenes of those early 
days : 

"The occasion and place of my first acquaintance with Dr. 
Blatchford was at a Presbyterian camp meeting, held near the 
Des Moines river, in Clark County, Mo. The reason of this 
kind of meeting was the scarcity of meeting houses for the 
use of the then scattered families of this denomination. To 
unite these loyal Christians, it was deemed well to have an 
occasional camp meeting, answering in some degree to the three 
or four days' meetings to which they were accustomed in their 
old home Churches. The preparations for the meeting were 
quite primitive. The friends would gather together, decide 
on the location, clear the ground, cut down trees, using the 
smaller ones for 'stringers,' and splitting the larger ones 
mto 'puncheons' for seats. A few log cabins were built, with 
a specially large one for the preachers. This was furnished 
with a half dozen split bottomed chairs, a small table, and an 
abundance of new, sweet straw. Then the rustic stand for 
the Minister completed this line of preparation for the big 
meeting. But this was by no means all the preparation made 
for the occasion. The faithful and devout women, not a 
few, had been saving their poultry and their pantries for 
weeks, to give of their best to the expected friends. 

Among the Ministers present at this first meeting, held, 
I think, in the fall of 1843, was the Rev. Dr. John Blatch- 
ford, who made a deep impression upon my then youthful 
mind. He was about forty-five years of age, yet seemed like 
a young man of twenty-five. He was in good health, of beam- 
ing countenance, filled with joy-giving life. Every one around 
him seemed to catch the inspiration that animated him. He 
was the manliest Minister I had ever met. No wonder the 
people listened to the words of truth and grace that poured 
from his lips ! His preaching was in the demonstration of the 
spirit and of power." 

Dr. Blatchford's winning personality and genial nature, 
his generous hospitality, and sense of humor, combined with 
strong social instincts, made him a delightful companion and 
cemented friendships among both young and old, the memory 
of which still lingers in the communities which enjoyed his 
ministrations. 

By reason of continued ill health, Dr. Blatchford was 
obliged to terminate his work in Chicago and retired from the 
pastorate, August 18, 1839, at his own request. 



236 JOHN BLATCHFORD. 

After a year in Wheeling, W, Va., he removed to Marion 
College, Mo. (1841-14), first as professor and afterward as 
President. In his own house, Dr. Blatchford conducted the 
education and training of theological students, and may be 
called the pioneer of New School Presbyterianism in Mis- 
souri. The last year of his life was spent in Quincy, Illinois, 
to which he removed in 1847. These later years were much 
occupied in establishing the Presbyterian Theological Sem- 
inary of the Northwest, now known as the McCormick Theo- 
logical Seminar}^ of Chicago. He was President of the Board 
of Directors at the time of his death, which occurred in St. 
Louis, April 8, 1855. 

I am indebted to Mr. Eliphalet W. Blatchford for the data 
given in this sketch of the life of his father. 




A\"KI. BASCOM 



FLAVEL BASCOM. 237 

FLAVEL BASCOM, SECOND MINISTER 

The i\Iemorial, published the year following Dr. Bas- 
com's death, contains the sermon of the Rev. G. F. S. Sav- 
age, D. D., prepared for the funeral services of "this devoted 
servant of the Lord," whose "long and eventful life of four 
score and six years has been mostly spent in faithful and 
successful service in the Christian ministry." Dr. Bascom was 
born June 8, 1804, in Lebanon, Conn., a town remarkable 
as the birthplace of many noted statesmen, governors, judges, 
divines, and theologians. As early as 1735, the Rev. Dr. Wheel- 
ock, afterward President of Dartmouth College, was Minister 
of the Church in "this little country town on the rocky hills of 
eastern Connecticut." He was an intimate friend and co- 
workei* with Whitefield, and, as a preacher, is said to have 
had the same remarkable power and control over his audiences. 
Five governors of the State of Connecticut were bom at 
Lebanon, viz. : two Jonathan Trumbulls, Joseph Trumbull, 
William A. Buckingham, and J. Clark Bissell. "The first 
governor Trumbull," says Dr. Savage, "was the 'Brother Jona- 
than' of Revolutionary fame, the right hand man and trusted 
counsellor of Washington during all that terrible struggle for 
independence, and whose influence was said to be second 
only to that of Washington." Among the eminent divines 
and theologians whose birthplace was Lebanon, we find the 
names of Dr. Joseph Lyman, Dr. Eliphalet Williams, Dr. 
Elijah Parish, Dr. R. R. Gurley, Dr. William Lyman, the Rev. 
David Huntington, the Rev. Daniel Huntington, father of 
Bishop Huntington of central New York, the Rev. John Bart- 
lett, and many others. 

Flavel Bascom entered Yale College in 182-i, and was 
graduated in 1828. Among his classmates were Prof. Ben- 
jamin D. Silliman, Judge O. S. Seymour, the Rev. T. S. Clark, 
D. D., and Hon. Linus Child. His theological studies were 
pursued at the Yale Theological Seminary, from which he 
was graduated in 1832. He was one of the band of Yale grad- 
uates who, in 1833, came as Home Missionaries to Illinois, 
entering the state at its upper gateway, Chicago, and after- 



238 FLAVEL BASCOM. 

ward founded the Illinois College at Jacksonville. Mr. Bascom 
found in Fort Dearborn, the Rev. Jeremiah Porter and the Rev. 
Aratus Kent, an heroic missionary, who had just come over 
to Chicago from his work in Galena, 111., and who, after- 
ward, wrote to the Secretary of the Home Society : "If the 
pier now commencing should be permanent and the harbor 
become a safe one, Chicago will undoubtedly grow as rapidly 
as any village in the western country." 

Dr. Bascom's first pastorate was in Tazewell County, III, 
and here he was ordained in 1833 as an evangelist by the 
Sangamon Presbytery. During the next six years, he labored 
as a home missionary, organizing Churches and preaching in 
Peoria, Tremont, and Pleasant Grove. 

He came to Chicago in the autumn of 1839, as agent 
of the American Home Missionary Society for the state of 
Illinois, and preached for a time to the people of the First 
Presbyterian Church after the departure of Dr. Blatchford. 
This resulted in a call being extended to him January 21, 
1840, to become the Minister of the Church. He accepted 
this invitation with the understanding that he might con- 
tinue his missionary labors during the summer months. As 
a result he was not installed until November 11, 1840. 

The first five years of Dr. Bascom's pastorate in Chi- 
cago, particularly the years 1841, 1843, and 1845, were dis- 
tinguished by extensive revivals of religion, resulting in the 
addition of large numbers to the membership of the First 
Church. The records of the Presbytery show that in 1846 the 
Society had 456 members on its rolls. Within the next five 
years, in consequence of the bitter dissensions among the mem- 
bers, caused by the discussion of the slavery question, the mem- 
bership declined nearly one-half. The population and wealth 
of the city, however, increased enormously during the nine 
years of Dr. Bascom's pastorate. When he began his labors 
in 1840, the population numbered 4,479, increasing to 23,047 
nine years later, when he tendered his resignation. As a conse- 
quence of this extraordinary growth of the city, the Church 
property at the corner of Clark and Washington streets had 
increased so much in value that the Trustees were enabled 



FLAVEL BASCOM. 239 

to mortgage the property for the money necessary to com- 
plete the ''Brick Church." At the dedicatory services of the 
new building in September, 1849, Dr. Bascom preached the 
sermon from the text which the Rev. Mr. Sewell used at 
the dedication of the historic Old South Church in Boston. 
"The glory of this latter house shall be greater than the 
glory of the former, saith the Lord of Hosts." (Haggai ii: 9.) 

Dr. Bascom's ministry in Chicago terminated in Decem- 
ber. 1849, being dismissed from the pastorate at his own re- 
quest. "At the urgent solicitation of friends of Knox Col- 
lege, and of the First Church of Christ, at Galesburg, 111., he 
removed there, and continued as the Minister of that Church 
from January 1, 1850, to May, 1855." The following year 
he again took up missionary work, and at the close of this 
agency, he removed to Dover, 111., serving as Minister of the 
Church there from April 1, 1859, to April 1, 1864. The 
establishment of Dover Academy was one of the results of 
this pastorate. From July, 1864, until November, 1869, he was 
Minister of the Church in Princeton, 111., removing after- 
ward to Hinsdale, where he continued to supply the Congre- 
gational Church from time to time until 1887, when extreme 
age made it necessary for him to lay aside the burdens of a 
regular Minister. Six months were spent by him in Mont- 
gomery, Ala., in happily ministering to a colored Church in 
that city. "Feeling the infirmities of age, he returned to 
Princeton to be near his son, and to end his life work among 
his former parishioners whom he loved, and by whom he 
was loved and honored." Dr. Bascom died at Princeton, 111., 
August 8, 1890. 

Mrs. Bascom died August 21, 1910, at Ottawa, 111. 



240 HARVEY CURTIS. 



HARVEY CURTIS, THIRD MINISTER 

The Rev. Harvey Curtis, D. D., son of Elisha and Resign 
(Clary) Curtis, was born in Adams, Jefferson County, N. Y., 
May 30, 1806. He was educated at Middlebury College, Ver- 
mont, graduating in August, 1831, with the highest honors of 
his class. After studying two years in Princeton Theological 
Seminary, he returned to Middlebury as a tutor. In 1834, 
he was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Troy, N. Y., 
and in the spring of 1835 became the stated supply of the 
Church in Whiting, Vt. Later in that year, he was ordained by 
the Brandon Congregational Association as Minister of the 
Congregational Church in Brandon, Vt., where he remained 
until 1841, when he removed to Cincinnati to assume the 
agency of the American Home Missionary Society. In 1843, 
he accepted a call to the First Presbyterian Church, of Madi- 
son, Ind., where he remained until the call came to him from 
the First Presbyterian Church of Chicago. 

The records of the Session contain this note, under date 
of August 26, 1850: 

"Session met and opened with prayer by the Rev. Harvey 
Curtis, who sat as Moderator for the first time after his accept- 
ance of the pastoral charge of this Church." 

Dr. Curtis' pastorate in Chicago was characterized by un- 
usual acceptance and usefulness, though he came at a critical 
period in the history of the Society, when its property was 
incumbered with a heavy debt and its membership much 
reduced by strife and dissension. Subsequent revivals, under 
his earnest ministration, added large numbers to the member- 
ship of the Church, and the growth in the wealth and popula- 
tion of the city (23,000 in 1850 and 97,000 in 1857) enabled 
the Society to dispose of its property to advantage, pay its 
debts, and secure for itself a better location on Wabash 
avenue. 

"He was prevailed upon against his own desires," says 
Dr. Barrows, "to accept the presidency of Knox College, 
Galesburg, 111., in 1858, where he laboriously and honorably 
served till his death, September 18, 1862." 




HAR\KV CrUTIS 



HARVEY CURTIS. 241 

Dr. Joseph F. Tuttle, President of Wabash College, in 
a letter to Dr. Barrows, at the time of the Jubilee Services 
in 1883, gave some recollections of Dr. Curtis : 

"He was a charming companion. As a preacher, he im- 
pressed me with a feeling that he was very sincere and earnest. 
He was an able speaker, and not infrequently truly eloquent. 
In the General Assembly, he was a fine debater, clear, earn- 
est, and master of himself. He shared in the great debates 
which made the Assembly (New School) so fascinating and 
aggressive, especially when slavery and the subjects of Church 
extension and Home Missions were discussed. Not an ex- 
tremist, he was strongly in favor of the plans which were so 
splendidly foreshadowed in Dr. Mills' great sermon on Home 
Missions before the Assembly at Utica in 1851. 

"Dr. Curtis, when I first saw him, was, physically, very 
vigorous ; lie had a good presence, a ringing and manly voice, 
an easy command of strong English words, and an air of 
earnestness that had no hint of afl:"ectation and that made him 
a strong man in the pulpit and on the floor of an ecclesiastical 
assembly." 

Mr. E. S. Wells, who came to Chicago in 1850, united with 
the First Church in 1854 and was later an Elder, said of Dr. 
Curtis : 

"There were few that had his foresight in regard to the 
future of Chicago. With a prophetic eye, he seemed to roll 
up the curtain of time and saw the mighty millions that would 
make Chicago the great commercial center it is today. Nor 
was his foresight confined to Chicago alone. No man in 
Chicago did more to lay the foundations of Lake Forest and 
its institutions of learning upon which others have builded so 
successfully, than he. 

"I remember the last sermon Dr. Curtis preached in the 
' Brick Church ' on the corner of Clark and Washington 
streets. There was a vein of humor which caused a smile 
when he said : ' When this Church was dedicated, God was 
thanked for the beautiful temple which they had been per- 
mitted and enabled to build for His worship, where we and 
our children and our children's children could assemble and 
worship, and the idea was, down to the remotest generation, 
and now in eight short years the deep, swift waves of business 
have overwhelmed us.' " 

Speaking of Dr. Curtis' pastorate here, Dr. Humphrey 
says: 



242 HARVEY CURTIS. 

"Though his Church was more than once sorely tried dur- 
ing his administration, he conducted it through its perils with 
consummate wisdom, and left it a strong and harmonious 
body." 

I am indebted to his son, Mr. Henry M. Curtis, for the 
excellent portrait of his father which accompanies this article. 

Another son, the Rev. Edward H. Curtis, D. D. has been, 
since 1895, minister of the Woodlawn Park Presbyterian 
Church of Chicago. 




ZEPHAXIAH MOORE HUMPHREY. 



ZEPHANIAH MOORE HUMPHREY. 243 



ZEPHANIAH MOORE HUMPHREY, 
FOURTH MINISTER 

While collecting material for this work, I wrote to Mrs. 
Humphrey, asking where I might obtain a copy of the Memorial 
Sketch of her husband, prepared by the Rev. David Torrey, 
D. D., of Cazenovia, N. Y. In her reply she said : 

"New Haven, Conn., May 24, 1899. 

"It is as if a hand had touched the strings of an instru- 
ment which had stood a long time silent, to have you ask for 
a copy of the Mem.orial of my dear husband. And from 
what source would I so like to have the touch come as from 
the dear old First Church of Chicago, the Zion to which was 
given the freshest, ripest and best period of his ministry." 

The Memorial Sketch is an affectionate testimonial from 
one who knew Dr. Humphrey well, from the time he entered 
college "until he finished his course on earth and entered into 
rest."^ 

Zephaniah Moore Humphrey was born August 30, 1824, 
at Amherst, Mass., and was named in honor of Dr. Zephaniah 
Moore, the first President of Amherst College. His father, 
Dr. Heman Humphrey,- was at that time its second President. 

The ancestors of Dr. Humphrey, both on his father's 
and mother's side, were of good New England stock. In 
the Humphrey line, may be found one governor of Massa- 
chusetts, and one governor of the New Haven colony — men 
whose strong characteristics were "piety and integrity." 
Zephaniah's paternal grandmother was Hannah Brown, a 
direct descendant of Peter Brown, who came over in the 
"Mayflower" in 1620. She was sister of Capt. John Brown 
of West Simsbury, Conn., and he was father of John Brown, 



1 Memorial Sketch of Zephaniah Moore Humphrey, by David Torrey. Lippincott 
& Co., Philadelphia, 1883. Dr. Torrey died September 29. 1894. at Cazenovia. X. Y. 

2 The First Church of Christ, in Pittsfield, Mass., contains this memorial for Dr. 
Heman Humphrey: 

"This Tablet is devoted by this Parish to the memory of Rev. Heman 
Humphrey. S. T. D.. who was installed Minister of Pittsfield, November 26, 1817. He 
was dismissed A. D. 1823, with universal regret, to take the Presidency of Amherst 
College, which he resigned and returned to this town A. D. 1840, where he lived 
twenty-one years, revered and loved by the whole people, and where he died April 30, 
1861. aged eighty-two years. 

'The righteous shall be in everlasting remembrance.' " 



244 ZEPHAXIAH MOORE HUMPHREY. 

of Ossawatomie, so that Zephaniah's father was own cousin 
to John Brown, of Ossawatomie. Zephaniah's mother was 
Sophia Porter, daughter of Noah Porter of Farmington, 
Conn. Her brother, Noah Porter, became Minister at Farm- 
ington, honored and esteemed in a pastorate which covered 
nearly sixty years. Of the children of the latter, his son, 
Noah, became the distinguished professor of philosophy, and 
afterward President of Yale University, while the daughter, 
Sarah Porter,^ was for thirty years proprietor and beloved 
principal of the well known Farmington School for young 
ladies. 

The years of Dr. Humphrey's childhood were passed at 
Amherst, among the wooded hills of the Connecticut valley, 
in the midst of a panorama of natural loveliness and beauty, 
scarcely to be surpassed in the whole world. 

He entered Amherst College in 1839, and, after gradu- 
ation in 1843, spent a year or more in charge of a select school 
at Crednal, Loudon County, Va. He returned north to spend 
a year at Union Seminary before going to Andover in 1847, 
where he came under the guidance of that prince of teachers, 
Professor Park, completing his course in 1849. In 1850 he 
became ^linister of the First Presbyterian Church in Racine, 
Wis. On April 20, 1853, he married Miss Harriette Sykes, 
of Westfield, N. Y. In 1856, he accepted a call to the Ply- 
mouth Congregational Church of Milwaukee, remaining there 
until he began his work in Chicago. 

Dr. Humphrey's pastorate in Chicago commenced May 
15, 1859. At the installation services on Tuesday evening, 
June 17, the Rev. Yates Hickey, the Moderator, offered the in- 
troductory prayer, read the Scripture lesson, and propounded 
the usual questions to the Minister and people. The Rev. 
Henry Neill of Detroit, preached the sermon from the text: 

"So then it is not of him that willeth nor of him that 
runneth, but of God that sheweth mercy." 

"For the Scripture saith unto Pharaoh, Even for this same 
purpose have I raised thee up, that I might show my power in 
thee, and that My name might be declared throughout all the 
earth." (Romans ix: 16, 17.) 

1 Miss Sarah Porter died at Farmington, Conn., Tebruary 17, 1900, aged eighty 
seven years. 




IRST I'RKSUVTERIAX CHfRCH 
rnbnsh Aveimo Xenr Cmisrcss Street. 



ZEPHANIAH MOORE HUMPHREY. 245 

The Rev. Robert W. Patterson, D. D., offered the installa- 
tion prayer. The charge to the Minister was delivered by 
the Rev. A. L. Brookes, and the charge to the people by the Rev. 
Harvey Curtis, D. D. 

Dr. Humphrey's ministry covered the entire period of 
the Civil War, four years of intense excitement and stirring 
events. 

"The pastor of the First Church," says Dr. Barrows, 
"was not found wanting in this great national emergency ; nor 
were its members, for they were enrolled among the nation's 
defenders and among the nation's martyrs." 

"The ministry of Dr. Humphrey," says Prof. Albert Mc- 
Calla, "was a period of great activity and growth in the 
Church. He was greatly beloved as a preacher, his services 
were largely attended, and the Church increased in membership 
and in means. The old edifice on Wabash avenue, north 
of Congress street, was completed by carrying up the two 
towers to their full height. When the lecture room, used for 
Sunday-school and prayer meetings, upstairs over the vesti- 
bule, became too small, the chapel was built on Congress street. 
It was during Dr. Humphrey's ministry that the Railroad Mis- 
sion Chapel was built on Pacific avenue, near Van Buren 
street, where its great school of a thousand members was 
gathered in. Out on the West Side, Foster Mission was built 
on Jefferson street. Two other smaller missions were estab- 
lished and carried on. In the great activities of the war time, 
the Soldiers' Aid Societies, the Woman's Sanitary Commission, 
etc., the members of this Church were leading workers." 

After nine years of earnest, blessed work. Dr. Hum- 
phrey tendered his resignation for reasons which were set forth 
in a letter read to the Congregation, Monday evening, February 
3, 1868: 

"Dear People: Grace be unto you, and peace from our 
Lord Jesus Christ. 

It is now nearly nine years since I became your pastor, 
and I may truly say, that while those years have consti- 
tuted a period of prosperity to the Church, they have been 
as full of happiness to me as you could make them. The 
cordiality with which you welcomed me at first has been more 
than sustained. I have long felt sure, not only of your inter- 
est, but also of your love. Until within a few months, I had 
cherished no thought or wish to leave you." 



246 ZEPHANIAH MOORE HUMPHREY. 

The Minister then referred to the call he had received 
from Calvary Church of Philadelphia, and the health of a 
beloved member of his family which had been seriously im- 
paired during the previous winter by the rigorous climate 
of Chicago, for whom a further residence in this city would 
be hazardous. 

"May God bless you for the past, and send you a Min- 
ister around wdiom you will gather with the unanimity with 
which you have gathered around me and mine, and who will 
do far more for your spiritual prosperity than I have been able 
to accomplish." 

On Sunday morning, March 1, 1868, the ^Minister preached 
his farewell sermon from the text : "And when he would not 
be persuaded, we ceased, saying, the will of the Lord be 
done." (Acts xxi: 14.) 

"Chicago will remain to me essentially what it is today, 
though to you it may broaden by the inflow of many millions. 
There will be new Ministers in all of these Churches, but to me 
the old ones will still be here. Nay, even that brother, be- 
loved, who has just found the messenger of death in that 
southern clime where he sought the angel of healing, will 
still be here." 

Dr. Humphrey here referred to the Rev. Edward A. 
Pierce, Minister of Calvary Presbyterian Church, who passed 
away, February 26, at Tallahassee, Fla. 

Dr. Humphrey removed to Philadelphia in the autumn 
of 1868 and remained there seven years as Minister of Calvary 
Church. When the General Assembly met in the First Church 
of Chicago in May, 1871, Dr. Humphrey was chosen Moder- 
ator. In September, 1875, he entered on the duties of pro- 
fessor of "Ecclesiastical History and Church Polity" in Lane 
Theological Seminary at Cincinnati, continuing there until his 
lamented death, which occurred November 13, 1881. Dr. Hum- 
phrey was buried in Graceland Cemetery, Chicago. 








ZEPHAXIAH MooRK Hl-MI'HREV. 



ARTHUR MITCHELL. 247 

ARTHUR MITCHELL, FIFTH MINISTER 

The Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., was born at Hudson, N. 
Y., August 13, 1835. After his graduation from Williams Col- 
lege in August, 1853, he was engaged one year as tutor at 
Lafayette College, in Easton, Pa. He then devoted one year or 
more to foreign travel. 

His theological studies were pursued at Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, entering in 1856, and graduating in 1859. 
He then accepted a call to the Third Presbyterian Church of 
Richmond, \'a., where he remained until May, 1861. He was 
married October 9, 1859, to Miss Harriet E. Post. The fol- 
lowing letter from the Rev. P. B. Price, who succeeded Dr. Mit- 
chell at Richmond, gives an interesting account of his work 
while in the South : 

"Roanoke, Va., June 9, 1899. 

"Rev. Arthur ]\Iitchell entered upon his duties as pastor 
of the Third Church of Richmond, on the last Sabbath in May, 
1859, and continued in this relation till the 27th of June, 1861, 
when he returned to New York City. 

"During this time, I resided within the bounds of the Con- 
gregation, of which I afterward succeeded him as pastor. 

"His preaching and his pastoral work, his social qualities, 
and his zeal and diligence attracted much attention from the 
beginning of his ministry; the Church grew and prospered un- 
der his care. He was distinguished for conscientiousness in the 
performance of all his duties, and would make important sacri- 
fices for conscience's sake. 

"Under this influence, he reached the conclusion that he 
ought to spend his vacation in preaching to the destitute, rather 
than in idle rest, for recreation. He went away in the summer 
to southwest Virginia and preached in protracted services to 
some obscure people in Grayson county. His labors were 
blessed, and the people showed that he had won their affection 
and excited their gratitude. The brethren of the Presbytery 
were warmly attached to him. 

"After he left Richmond, I visited him in Morristown, N. 
J., in 1866, where he was pastor of a large and important 
Church, and was much esteemed. He told me that he was 
preaching there the same simple Gospel sermons that he had 
preached in Richmond, 



248 ARTHUR MITCHELL. 

"1 had the use of ]\Ir. Mitchell's library until I could send 
it to him after the war. It abounded in evidences of his studies 
and pious habits. 

"When he came to Richmond, soon after the war, he left 
with me $200, to be distributed among those of the Congrega- 
tion who were in need at that time ; some were in this condition 
who had not known the ills of poverty before." 

Dr. Mitchell's next pastorate was with the South Street 
Presbyterian Church, of Morristown, N. J. Here he labored 
from October, 1861, until he began his work in Chicago in the 
autumn of 1868. 

In his letter of acceptance to the First Presbyterian 
Church of Chicago, dated August 24, 1868, he says : 

"I accept the call which you have tendered me to be- 
come your pastor. 

"I hope to remove to Chicago by the middle of October, 
but doubt whether I shall be able to enter fully upon the 
labors of my pastorate before the first of November. If it is 
possible for me to do so earlier, I will. Upon one point 
allow me a frank, plain word. I fear that in a Congregation 
of the size of yours I shall not be able to maintain that sys- 
tem of general visitation which some pastors have the 
strength to observe, and which I know is of the utmost use- 
fulness." 

Dr. Mitchell preached his first sermon as Minister of 
our Church, October 25, 1868, from Isaiah Ixiv: 6: "But we 
are all as an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses are 
as filthy rags." He was installed November 10, 1868. 

It was my privilege to hear him for the first time on a 
Sunday morning soon after his installation. When the hour 
for opening Divine service had arrived, the new Minister 
came promptly into the pulpit — a slightly built man, about 
five feet six inches in height, with dark brown hair, mous- 
tache, and eyes, and a kindly, earnest face, which fairly 
glowed with enthusiasm as he became interested in his sub- 
ject. The sermon that day was on Congregational singing, 
how to promote it, how to elevate it; a subject with which 
the preacher, a good singer himself, was perfectly familiar, 
and which he handled ably and skillfully. Dr. Mitchell be- 
lieved that much of the music used in Church worship should 
be of a kind in which the Congregation could take a hearty 




ARTHIR MITCHKL 



ARTHUR MITCHELL. 249 

part. The Minister spoke simply and unaffectedly, without 
any attempt at oratory; but there were few in the Congre- 
gation that morning who did not go away fully convinced 
that here was a man of whose sincerity and piety there could 
not be the slightest question: elements of his character 
which afterward won for him the respect and esteem of all 
the people in this city. 

In May, 1871, largely through the influence of our Min- 
ister, the General Assembly^ of the Presbyterian Church held 
its annual meeting in the edifice of the First Church. Dr. 
Mitchell was very active in making this meeting of the As- 
sembly a success, and was appointed a member of the com- 
mittee on devotional exercises. The Rev. Z. M. Humphrey, 
D. D., of Philadelphia, the former Minister of the First 
Church, was elected Moderator. The Rev. Herrick Johnson, 
D. D., was appointed chairman of the Committee on Home 
Missions, and the Rev. Samuel C. Logan, D. D., chairman 
of the Committee on Foreign Missions. One of the notable 
commissioners to this meeting of the Assembly was the Rev. 
John Hall, D. D., of New York City. The retiring Moder- 
ator, the Rev. J. Trumbull Backus, D. D., preached the ser- 
mon from the text : 

"From whom the whole body fitly joined together and 
compacted by that which every joint supplieth, according to 
the effectual w^orking in the measure of every part, maketh 
increase of the body unto the edifying of itself in love." 
(Ephesians iv : 16.) 

After the consolidation (October, 1871) of the First 
Church with the Calvary Presbyterian, an important work 
confronted Minister and officers — the completion of the edi- 
fice commenced by Calvary Church (1870), at the corner of 
Indiana avenue and Twenty-first street, the future home of 
the new First Church. Messrs. James Otis, chairman of the 
building committee, J. C. Cochrane, architect, and Addison 
Ballard, superintendent, had many conferences with Dr. Mit- 



1 Two other meetings of the Assembly in Chicago may be noted; that of 1858, of 
which the Rev. L. P. Thompson, D. D., of Buffalo, N. V., was Moderator, and that 
of 1877, of which the Rev. James Eells, D. D., of San Francisco, California, was Moder- 
ator. Mr. Henry W. Dudley, of our Session, has kindly given me the above facts, 
regarding the meetings of the .\ssembly in Chicago. 



250 ARTHUR MITCHELL. 

chell over the details of the new Church. The plans of the 
architect called for a tall, graceful spire. But the Trustees 
did not wish the spire to be built, on account of the diffi- 
culty of construction and the cost. Dr. Mitchell and Mr. Bal- 
lard thought otherwise. 

"I held a serious consultation/' said Mr. Ballard, "with 
Messrs. Otis and Cochrane and the Minister, and we decided 
to go on with the construction of the spire and put it in 
place without further agitation of the subject. I had the 
timber delivered on the ground of the vacant lot on Indiana 
avenue, opposite the Church, and here we built the spire, 
fitting each piece in its place. Then we took it all apart and 
lifted it, with derricks, piece by piece, to the tower of the 
Church, and before anyone knew what was going on, we had 
the spire in place. Today it stands a thing of beauty, to be 
seen from afar, and to be recognized as the spire of the First 
Presbyterian Church. There is not another one in the city 
of such beautiful proportions." 

Dr. Mitchell always showed a great interest in munici- 
pal reform ; he attended the primaries regularly, worked at 
the polls, and often preached from the pulpit on the respon* 
sibilities and obligations of citizens in such matters. The 
scenes in connection with the ballot box stuffing at the 
South Town election, April 4, 1876, which he witnessed, with 
other citizens, and the outburst of popular indignation when 
three disreputable candidates declared themselves elected 
collector, assessor, and town clerk — all these matters will be 
recalled. When the election of these men was contested by a 
citizens' committee before the justices of the peace of the 
South Town on April 15, the evidence of the witnesses 
showed conclusively that the ballot boxes had been tampered 
with ; the statement of Dr. Mitchell was particularly clear 
and positive. The court decided accordingly, declaring that 
there was no valid election and that vacancies existed in the 
offices of collector, assessor, and town clerk. 

The Chicago Tribune of April 17 said of Dr. Mitchell's 
action in this election : 

"The Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., 'the little dominie' of ad- 
mirable resources in connection with the recent stirring 
events in the South Town, preached yesterday in the First 



^^^r flH^pB 



ARTHUR MITCHELL 



ARTHUR MITCHELL. 251 

Presbyterian Church on the duties of Christian citizens in 
the present crisis. A clergyman who knows how to act, 
ought to know how to preach about an emergency." 

Among the important sermons of Dr. Mitchell was that 
on systematic giving, entitled "The King's Business," on 
the text, "Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I 
have given order to the churches of Galatia, even so do ye" 
(I Cor. xvi : 1, 2), delivered from the pulpit of this Church, 
January 19, 1879. This sermon resulted in establishing the 
system of annual pledges and weekly ofterings, for the vari- 
ous benevolent causes. 

In August, 1880, the Minister accepted a call from the 
First Presbyterian Church of Cleveland, Ohio, and preached 
his farewell sermon in Chicago, October 17, 1880. 

He resigned his pastorate in Cleveland to accept the 
position of Secretary of the Board of Foreign Missions, en- 
tering on his duties in New York City, July 4, 1884. Few 
men were better informed on the work of Foreign Missions 
than Dr. Mitchell. It had been with him a subject of care- 
ful, earnest study from the commencement of his ministry, 
and he knew the needs and resources of the Board and the 
work in the mission fields, as he knew his Bible. 

In July, 1889, he started, under the appointment of the 
Board, to visit the mission stations in Japan, Korea, China,^ 
Siam, and Syria, returning to New York City in July of the 
following year. While on that tour, he was taken seriously 
ill in Siam, and several months elapsed before he could 
resume work; the Board accordingly requested him not to 
begin his duties in New York City until October, 1890. In 
the spring of 1892, his health again showing symptoms of 
giving way, the Board allowed him a vacation of three 
months for a trip to the Pacific coast, where he regained a 
fair amount of vigor. In November of that year, he went 

1 Two of Dr. Mitchell's daughters are devoting their lives to the work which was 
the all absorbing thought with their father — Foreign Missions. Alice Mitchell is a 
missionarj- in India, stationed in the foot-hills of the Himalayas. Julia Post Mitchell 
has been appointed a member of the Faculty of the Christian College, in Canton, 
China, and departed for her field of labor in July, 1913. Miss Mitchell is a graduate of 
Smith College (1901); was instructor in English, Vassar College (1908-9); lecturer on 
Shakespeare. Columbia College (1911-12). She is preparing for publication a biog- 
raphy of St. Jean de Crevecoeur, a post revolutionary consul from France to the 
United States. 



252 ARTHUR MITCHELL. 

to Florida by the advice of his physician, returning north 
early in the following year. Dr. Mitchell's last public ad- 
dress was at Albany, in October, 1892, before the Synod of 
New York. He passed away on April 24, 1893, at Saratoga, 

N. Y. 



JOHN HENRY BARROWS. 253 

JOHN HENRY BARROWS, SIXTH 
MINISTER 

My recollections of Dr. Barrows date from a morning 
spent in his home in East Boston, Mass., thirty-two years ago. 
He was then Minister of the Maverick Congregational Church 
of that city, but was considering the call which he had just 
received from the First Church of Chicago. My mission 
was quite unofficial, simply to meet the Minister and his 
wife and urge their acceptance of the call, assuring them 
of the cordial welcome they would receive from our people. 
I came away from the interview impressed with the attrac- 
tive personality, sincere spirituality, and lofty ideals of this 
young preacher. 

"Among the supporters of the First Church at this 
time," says Mary Eleanor Barrows,^ ''were strong men, Dr. 
D. K. Pearsons and Marshall Field of national reputation, 
old settlers with force and sagacity, men and women of va- 
ried talent, devoted to the Church and ready to co-operate 
with a leader who should possess large ideals for them and 
their city." 

Such a leader was John Henry Barrows. "The man and 
the hour's come." 

His parents were the Rev. John Manning Barrows and 
Catherine Payne Moore, an early graduate of Oberlin Col- 
lege. The simple, wholesome life of Professor Barrows and 
his wife in the Medina Union Seminary, where the father 
taught school in the morning and worked an eighty acre 
farm in the afternoon, while the mother spent the morning 
in housework, cooked dinner for their fourteen boarders, 
and in the afternoon taught mathematics — all this had much 
to do with the making of John Henry Barrows. Such were 
the surroundings of the birthplace, July 11, 1847, in a log 
cabin near Medina, Lenawee county, Michigan, of one of 
America's famous preachers, the sixth Minister of this 
Church. 



' "John Henr>' Barrows;" a Memoir by his daughter, Mary Eleanor Barrows. 
Fleming H. Revell Company, Chicago, 1904. 



254 JOHN HENRY BARROWS. 

In 1867 he was graduated from Olivet College, Michigan, 
and entered Yale Divinity School in the autumn, where, 
"thanks to the discipline of Western halls, he was a leader in 
his class." He attended the lectures of Professors Day, 
Porter, and Dwight, but, best of all, our young Candidatiis 
Theologiae, heard Newman Hall, whom he thought a great 
preacher, but not like Beecher, "a wellspring of Divine 
power." The following year, while attending lectures at 
Union Seminary, New York City, he became a member of 
Plymouth Church, Brooklyn, in order that he might come 
under the influence of its noted preacher, Henry Ward 
Beecher. 

Forced by ill health to abandon study in the autumn of 
1869, he became a farmer and home missionary in Osage 
county, Kansas. There he lived three years, preaching, 
farming, lecturing, and writing, until the spring of 1872, 
when he was called to the First Congregational Church of 
Springfield, Illinois. Ill health again interrupted his work. 
On the 21st of June, 1873, Mr. Barrows sailed for Europe for a 
year of travel and study. Among his fellow passengers on 
ship, was Miss Sarah Eleanor Mole, of Williamstown, Massa- 
chusetts, "who immediately assumed possession of his 
heart." Years afterward he dedicated his most important 
work to her, "the bright star of a happy Christian home, the 
crown of God's best earthly gifts." He remained one year 
abroad, preaching at the American Chapel in Paris and in 
Rome, with hard study ad interim, finally visiting Egypt, Greece, 
and the Holy Land. In London, he heard Spurgeon speak to 
a great audience, on Stephen's ^lartyrdom, "one of the richest, 
most pungent, and most telling sermons that I have ever heard." 

Upon his return to America, he spent one year at the 
Andover Theological Seminary, during which time, he had the 
opportunity of preaching frequently during the winter of 1874 
at the Park Street Church, Boston. In February, 1875, he was 
called to the Eliot Congregational Church, of Lawrence, 
Massachusetts, and on April 29, was both ordained and in- 
stalled. On May 6, 1875, John Henry Barrows and Sarah 



JOHN HENRY BARROWS. 255 

Eleanor Mole were married — "a wise step, as Mrs. Barrows 
was of incalculable aid to her husband, by her good coun- 
sel, high ideals, and unfailing sympathy." 

His next pastorate was that of the Maverick Congrega- 
tional Church of East Boston, where he was installed in De- 
cember, 1880. This new field was full of interest to him, as 
he came in contact at the Boston Ministers' meetings, with 
such men as Drs. S. E. Herrick, J. L. Withrow, of Park 
Street Church (later with the Third Presbyterian of Chi- 
cago), and Charles F. Thwing, President of Adelbert Col- 
lege of Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. At a 
meeting of the members of the First Presbyterian Church 
and Society of Chicago, Wednesday evening, July 27, 1881, a 
formal call was extended to the Rev. John Henry Barrows 
to become their Minister. Although the new opening great- 
ly interested him, he felt bound to decline, as he had been 
only one winter in Boston, and the Maverick Church was 
$33,000 in debt. My father, Mr. James Otis, was in Boston 
at the time and called on Mr. Barrows. "Why do you hesi- 
tate, young man, about accepting this call? The West is 
the place for young men. There are strong men in the 
First Church, and they need you." Our committee agreed 
finally to pay $5,000 towards the debt if he would come to 
Chicago. With the aid of Mr. Edward Kimball, the famous 
debt raiser, the entire sum was secured that summer, and 
the call from our Church accepted. 

One clause from his letter of acceptance, October 3, 
1881, may be quoted: 

"The earnest unanimity which you have manifested in 
regard to my coming to Chicago is to me a cheerful proph- 
ecy that we are to work together with Christian zeal for the 
great ends of the Gospel." 

Sunday evening services in Central Music Hall, then 
at the southeast corner of State and Randolph streets, had 
been started by Mr. William L. Tomlins, conductor of the 
Apollo Musical Club, the first being held Sunday evening, 
December 10, 1882, with an address by Professor Swing on 
"The Relation of Music to Morals." Mr. Tomlins' plan was 
to have the co-operation of the Ministers of Chicago at 



256 JOHN HENRY BARROWS. 

these services, with the assistance of local soloists and a 
chorus from the Apollo Musical Club. Owing to a lack of 
systematic financial support, the work was about to stop. At 
the request of Mr. Tomlins, I asked Mr. Barrows if he would 
not speak some Sunday evening. He kindly accepted the 
invitation, and on Sunday evening, January 7, 1883, spoke 
on the Lord's Prayer. While waiting for the people to as- 
semble, an audience which filled every vacant seat and every 
inch of standing room, I told Mr. Barrows of Mr. Tomlins'^ 
purpose to abandon the services. "I can make this suc- 
ceed," was his reply. "What an audience! What an in- 
spiration !" A committee from the First Church was soon 
formed for maintaining the services until June, with Mr. 
Tomlins as leader of the chorus, Mr. Clarence Eddy, organ- 
ist, and the Choir of the First Church. The Central Music 
Hall work was carried on until June 1, 1888. From 1888-91, 
Sunday evening services were held in the home Church 
with a large Choir and instrumental soloists. 

Mr. Barrows received the degree of D. D. in 1882 from 
the University of Lake Forest, and in 1884, he was elected a 
Trustee of Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois. 

On April 28-30, 1889, our Church celebrated the Centen- 
nial of the adoption of the Constitution of the United States. 
Dr. Barrows preached a great sermon at each service, full 
of gratitude for the fundamental laws of our land and to 
God who has preserved us as a nation. "His beautiful trib- 
ute to the common soldier of the Union army," said Col. 
Charles Ailing, "is a prose-poem and has found its way into 
the school readers. No more eloquent or practical civic 
patriot than John Henry Barrows ever graced an American 
pulpit." 

On December 6, 1891, he preached his tenth anniversary 
sermon. At the beginning of his ministry, the membership 
of the First Church was between eight and nine hundred. 
At the end of the first ten years 1,227 members had been 



•Mr. William L. Tomlins came, in 1875, to Chicago; was organist of Christ Re- 
formed Church for several years; conductor of Apollo Musical Club (1875-1898); has 
given much thought and work to the development of children's voices; is now (1913) 
Supervisor of Music in the public schools of Washington, D. C. 



JOHN HEXRY BARROWS. 257 

added, 327 coming- on confession of faith. In these ten 
years, the sum of $839,000 was given by the Church for all 
benevolent purposes. 

"The Pulpit Treasury," of New York City, June, 1884, 
said of Dr. Barrows: 

"His peculiar function is to preach. It is at the altar 
his lips are touched. There is something magnetic about 
his personal appearance. He is noticeably tall and lithe in 
form. His physique, at first sight, does not indicate such 
enormous endurance as he seems to possess. Perhaps no 
Minister in America carries a heavier ministerial responsi- 
bility." 

Among the notable sermons preached in the First 
Church were: "The Perfection of the Bible," "The Nation 
and the Soldier," "Martin Luther," "Saving Our Country" 
and "Municipal Patriotism." 

The Parliament of Religions, which met in Chicago 
during the World's Fair (1893), was organized by Dr. Bar- 
row^s, as a plan for bringing together in one assembly "rep- 
resentatives of all the great historical faiths of the world — 
Brahmans, Buddhists, Moslems, Parsees, Confucians, Jews, 
and the great Churches of Christendom." In this work, he 
had the cordial assistance of religious leaders in every part 
of the world. One direct outcome of this religious conven- 
tion was the founding by Mrs. Caroline E. Haskell of "The 
Barrows' Lectureship" in the University of Chicago, with 
an income sufficient to provide a series of lectures in India 
on the relation of Christianity to other religions. Having 
been asked to open the course of lectures, and realizing that 
his heart was in this new and broader field of \vork, Dr. 
Barrows tendered his letter of resignation to the First 
Church, on Sunday morning, November 24, 1895 : 

"I desire to present to you a communication similar to the 
one I have already ofirered to the Session. Fourteen years 
and more have elapsed since the call to the pastorate of this 
Church w^as placed in my hands. The acquaintance w^hich 
I have had wath this company of Christians has only deep- 
ened my affection for the Mother Church of Chicago. Its 
history, benevolence, its devotion to the Kingdom of Christ, 
and that spirit of unity which has marked its life, are widely 



258 JOHN HENRY BARROWS. 

known and honored. Among the Ministers of this Church, 
I have served you longest. 

"But the time has now come when I am clear in my 
judgment that I am called of God, to resign this charge, in 
order that I may have the privilege of establishing the 
Christian work in India, to which I have been providentially 
summoned." 

On February 16, 1896, Dr. Barrows preached his last 
sermon in our Church as its Minister. He passed the sum- 
mer and autumn in Germany preparing for his work in India, 
and the winter of 1896-1897 delivering a course of lectures on 
the Christian religion in Bombay, Calcutta, and Madras. On 
his return to Chicago, he preached in the Kenwood Evangel- 
ical Church for some months. During this time, he pre- 
pared three works for publication : "Christianity, the 
World's Religion," "A World Pilgrimage," and "The Chris- 
tian Conquest of Asia." 

At a special meeting of the Board of Trustees of Ober- 
lin College, on November 29, 1898, Dr. Barrows was unan- 
imously elected President, and entered upon the duties of 
his office January 4, 1899. For three and one-half years, he 
labored with great success for the College, adding $600,000 
to its endowment, and securing other funds with which sev- 
eral buildings were added to the College equipment. On 
Sunday, May 18, 1902, President Barrows preached in the 
First Church, and on Thursday evening, May 22, he attended 
a reception given at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York City, 
by the Presbytery and General Assembly to celebrate the fa- 
vorable outcome of the revision of the Creed. On the way home, 
he contracted a severe cold, which soon developed into pneu- 
monia with grave complications. On Saturday, the 31st, the 
disease took a serious turn, though he rallied somewhat on Sun- 
day and Monday following. The end came quietly and without 
pain at three o'clock on Tuesday morning, June 3. 

Dr. Tenney, in his address at the funeral, said of the 
last hours : 

"Once the President murmured to himself, 'Drifting 
away, drifting away/ and when a loved voice responded, 
'Yes, but you have your Pilot on board,' he responded with 
Tennyson's words: 




[EXKV HARROW; 



JOHN HENRY BARROWS. 269 

"I hope to meet my Pilot, face to face, 
When I have crossed the bar." 

Aly Journal has a few notes about the impressive funeral 
services : 

"June 5: At 6 A. M., a committee from the College 
met our party at the station and assigned us to private 
houses, where we were entertained for the day. Later, 
while walking about the campus, we saw at a distance the 
students carrying the casket of their beloved President from 
his home to the Church (Second Congregational) ; the early 
rays of the sun shining through the tall trees on this sad 
cortege — very picturesque. At 9 :30, we assembled in the 
Sunday-school room of the Church — joining the family and 
friends ; then going to the audience room above. The serv- 
ices began with the chorus from Mendelssohn's 'Elijah,' 'Be- 
hold, God the Lord Passed By,' sung by the College Choir of 
one hundred and fifty voices, directed by Professor A. S. 
Kimball. After Dr. Tenney's address, came Barnby's hymn, 
'O Paradise.' Professor King's eulogy was followed by the 
'Sanctus and Benedictus' from Gounod's Mass. After the 
benediction by Dr. Chichester, the Choir responded with 
'The Seven-Fold Amen.' The singing of these clear young 
voices was most effective, bringing tears to my eyes. Then 
the procession to the cemetery; casket borne by the students 
in relays ; the burial service at the grave, read by Professor 
Bosworth ; the prayer from 'Elijah' set to the words, 'Jesus, 
Lover of My Soul,' sung by the students while the casket 
was lowered." 

Ten years have passed since the above was written, and 
I am thinking of that sad day, June 5, 1902, my first and only 
visit to Oberlin. I remember the service in the Church, and 
Mendelssohn's dramatic music, "A Mighty Wind" and 
"After the Fire" ; it will always haunt me. I tried to follow 
the speakers in their words of love for the fallen leader. I 
remember the procession of students carrying the casket, 
aptly called "The Living Hearse" ; but my thoughts would 
go back twenty years to the day when John Henry Barrows 
came to Chicago ; his first sermon in our Church, November 6, 
1881 ; the installation, December 8, 1881, and our work at 
Central Music Hall. Blessed fellowship ! Blessed compan- 
ionship ! Happy days for him and for me ! 



260 , WILLIAM JOHN CHICHESTER. 

WILLIAM JOHN CHICHESTER, 
SEVENTH MINISTER 

During the fourteen years of Dr. Barrows' ministry- 
there were more additions to the membership and larger 
gifts ($900,000) to benevolences than in any other period of 
the Church's history. In 1896, grave problems were facing 
the Church. The strong men and women were passing away; 
others, making new homes in Kenwood, were urging that the 
Church should also move to that part of the city. The ques- 
tion of a successor to Dr. Barrows was, therefore, a serious 
consideration with the Session and Pastoral Committee. 

Far away on the Pacific Coast, there was a man, conse- 
crated in spirit, sincere in purpose, devoted to his work, and 
to his God, who would soon be called to the vacant pulpit in 
Chicago. 

One day I read a magazine story, the scene of which 
was laid in the Cathedral town of Chichester, England. It 
was about the routine of the Cathedral, the doings of Dean 
and Chapter, love afifairs of the canons, with charming 
glimpses of English country life, which reminded me much of 
Anthony Trollope's "Barchester Towers." A few days later, I 
met one of our Session and asked if they had found a Min- 
ister. "Oh, yes," was the reply; "we shall recommend Dr. 
Chichester of Los Angeles, Cal." Ever afterward I associ- 
ated our Minister with that dainty story of the old Cathedral 
at Chichester. 

At a meeting of the Church and Society, on Wednesday 
evening, June 30, 1897, a formal call was extended to the 
Rev. William John Chichester, D. D., of Los Angeles, Cal, 
to become the Minister of our Church. Messrs. Henry W. 
Dudley, Ernest A. Hamill, and Hamilton Borden w^ere ap- 
pointed a committee to prosecute the call. 

The laws of the Presbyterian Church are as exacting 
as those of the Musicians' Union. Dr. Chichester, a mem- 
ber of the Los Angeles Presbytery, could not come to Chi- 
cago without his "transfer card," or letter of dismissal. He 
was greatly beloved by all classes of people in Los Angeles. 




WILLIAM JdllX CHICHESTER. 



WILLIAM JOHN CHICHESTER. 2G1 

When it was known that they were about to lose the Min- 
ister of Immanuel Church, pubhc sentiment was aroused, 
meetings were held, and he was urged to stay. The Pres- 
bytery declined to give their consent to his leaving, on the 
ground that he was greatly needed in Los Angeles. "Are 
there not Ministers nearer home," said the Los Angeles peo- 
ple, "from whom the Chicago committee can make a selec- 
tion, without coming to California?" The Los Angeles 
Presbytery finally consented that Dr. Chichester might ac- 
cept the call to Chicago, but not until a special committee, 
Drs. Herrick Johnson, McPherson, and McClure, appointed 
by the Chicago Presbytery, came to the assistance of the 
committee of the First Church. 

Dr. Chichester's letter of acceptance was read at a meet- 
ing of the Church and Society on Wednesday evening, July 
7, in which he stated that he would begin his labors Octo- 
ber 1, 1897. 

A few days later, I wrote to him, enclosing some of our 
Sunday calendars, telling him also of the Choir and the mu- 
sic. His reply was dated, Manitou, Colo., August 3, 1897 : 

"I thank you for your good letter of July 9 and its 
enclosures. I have heard so many pleasant things about the 
Choir and the music of the First Church, I am sure we 
shall be fast friends from the start. How happy I will be to 
take up my work October 1." 

Early in September, I wrote him again, suggesting a 
special musical service for his first Sunday in Chicago, to 
which he replied from Manitou, September 24, expressing 
his great pleasure for the "proposed musical welcome" and 
closed with suggestions as to the hymns to be sung and the 
general order of service for the occasion. Dr. Chichester's 
first service in our Church was held on October 3, 1897; his 
installation followed on Wednesday evening, October 20. 

In Dr. Chichester, we had a man of real sincerity, vision, 
and the power of inspiring love. His broad Christian char- 
acter was witnessed to by the enduring quality of his influ- 
ence. The new Minister, by his deep piety and lovely per- 
sonality, made friends at once among the people, and more 



262 WILLIAM JOHN CHICHESTER. 

than four hundred members were added to the Church rolls 
in the first three years of his ministry. 

In the summer of 1902, through his efforts, the exterior 
of the Church was put in thorough repair and the interior 
renovated and redecorated. New windows, new colors, new 
carpets, greeted the eyes and gladdened the hearts of the 
people when the main auditorium was opened on the second 
Sunday in September. The Music Committee will always 
hold Dr. Chichester in grateful remembrance for the addi- 
tional space provided at this time for the Choir. Without 
the enlarged Choir loft, the Special Musical Services of recent 
years would have been impossible. 

During the ministry of Dr. Chichester (1897-1903), one 
question was constantly in the hearts of Minister and people 
— the future of the Church; how to retain the interest of 
members living in the suburbs; how to find new, working 
members in the restless population in our part of the city. 
The Session decided that due regard must be given to the 
strong supporters living north of Thirtieth street, and that, 
for the present, the location of the Church should not be 
changed. These questions weighed heavily on the Minister. 
He had given heart and soul to this work ; soon he was to 
lay down his life. Early in February, 1903, Dr. Chichester 
contracted a severe cold, which kept him from his pulpit on 
the fifteenth, Dr. Clififord W. Barnes preaching in his place. 
The Minister was at his post as usual the next three Sun- 
days, but against the wishes of his physician. Dr. Dickey 
spoke on March 15. Complications in his disease arising, 
Dr. Chichester started South on the 16th, hoping rest and 
a warmer climate would be beneficial. He was obliged to 
break his journey at Atlanta, Ga., dangerous symptoms hav- 
ing developed. None of us ever thought that he was soon 
to take "the better journey." On Sunday, the 22nd, his old 
friend. Dr. Noble of Los Angeles, was the preacher, and told 
the Congregation of Dr. Chichester's serious illness. The 
end came on Monday evening, March 23, 1903, at Atlanta, 
Ga. Mrs. Chichester and Mr. and Mrs. William H. Swift 
of our Church were with the Minister in his last hours. 



WILLIAM JOHN CHICHESTER. 2G3 

Mr. Henry H. Plunger, in his remarks at the Memorial 
Service for former Ministers, November 23, 1904, said: 

"One year and eight months ago this day, there passed 
from earth to heaven the spirit of our last beloved Minister, 
Dr. Chichester. 

"While we venerate and love the memory of those of 
our Ministers who had preceded him, we are drawn with 
peculiar tenderness and affection to the memory of Dr. 
Chichester, for his was the first life taken from us, as Min- 
ister, in the history of our Church. 

"After his departure from our midst, the Session re- 
ceived, from various organizations with which he had been 
connected, resolutions of sympathy and testimonies of ap- 
preciation. 

"I will read extracts from one only, the action of the 
Board of Directors of McCormick Theological Seminary : 

" 'Dr. Chichester was born at Baltimore, Maryland, 
October 20, 1849, of parents who emigrated from the 
province of Ulster, Ireland, and who brought with them the 
sturdy faith of the North of Ireland Presbyterians. At the 
age of six years his father died, leaving a widow and two 
sons. He was graduated from Baltimore City College in 
1867, being the valedictorian of his class and carrying off 
the prize, in money, offered by the city of Baltimore. His 
means being limited, he went into business as a clerk in a 
dry goods store, but with his mind set on the ministry he 
was not happy at his work. He carried his difficulty to his 
pastor, by whose advice and assistance he found his way to 
the Western Theological Seminary at Allegheny, Pa., where 
he won the lifelong friendship of Dr. Archibald Alexander 
Hodge, and was graduated in 1870, after which he took a 
post-graduate course at Princeton. His ministry began at 
the Second Church of Altoona, Pa., where he remained 
seven years, going thence to Titusville, Pa., where, after a 
ministry of two years, he was called to the First Church of 
Germantown, Pa., whence, after a ministry of five years, he 
crossed the continent to take charge of the First Church of 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

" 'The most distinctive work of Dr. Chichester's life 
was the organization of Immanuel Church, Los Angeles. 
After a ministry at the First Church covering three years, 
his eye detected the need of a new Church in what was to be 
the residence center of the city. Six years afterward the 
handsome and spacious edifice in which the Assembly is to 
meet was dedicated free of debt, with a membership of 



264 WILLIAM JOHN CHICHESTER. 

1,200, and with a position on the Pacific coast which has 
been well described as "A Spiritual Pharos, whose beams light 
the travelers from the East, and meet the longing eye from 
China and Japan." ' 

"Dr. Chichester entered upon his work in Chicag"o in 
1897, and brought to the First Church his ripe experience, 
his unflagging zeal and his sympathetic spirit. 

"He was a valued member of the committee charged 
with the serious problem of mission work in the city of Chi- 
cago, of the Board of Directors of the Presbyterian Hospi- 
tal, with its widespread influence for the relief of suffering, 
and of the General Assembly's committee on evangelistic 
work. Three years ago it was proposed that he be a mem- 
ber of the General Assembly, but, loyal to California, he 
expressed a preference to wait until the Assembly should 
meet within its bounds. He died just before the Presbytery 
of Chicago met, when, with hearty unanimity, he would 
have been elected to represent it in the Assembly which 
was about to sit in his own Church at Los Angeles. 

"But God had prepared for him better things. The 
long work of the servant was done, and the reward was at 
hand. He knew his time had come, and he was eager to go 
to the Master whom he had preached for thirty-two years." 




JOHX ARCHIBALD MoRISoX. 



JOHN ARCHIBALD MORISON. 265 

JOHN ARCHIBALD MORISON, 
EIGHTH MINISTER 

The doctrine of reciprocity between Canada and the 
United States was favorably entertained by the authorities 
at Washington and Ottawa, but did not meet the unquali- 
fied approval of the people of either country. Canada has 
resources of greater value than her immense stores of grain, 
timber, and ore. She has men — men whom she is sending 
continually to the United States to seek homes and to fill 
positions of honor, trust, and responsibility. Two men, 
whom many of my readers have known and loved, came to 
Chicago in years past from Canada: John Monro Gibson of 
Montreal, to be the Minister of the Second Presbyterian 
Church (1874-1880), and William John McCaughan of To- 
ronto, to the Third Presbyterian Church (1898-1907). To 
these there is now added a third, John Archibald Morison of 
St. John, N. B., who came to the First Presbyterian Church 
(1904-1910). All these men were earnest preachers of the 
Word, sound theologians, Apostles of God. 

In the summer of 1903, while in the East on my vacation, 
I went to St. John, N. B., at the request of our committee, to 
meet the Rev. John Archibald Morison, Ph. D. My route 
was by sea from Boston to Halifax, N. S., arriving July 29, 
thence by train through the beautiful Evangeline country to 
Dig-by, crossing the Bay of Fundy, and arriving at St. John 
on July 31. Never have I had a more delightful mission. 
Coming with a letter of introduction from the Rev. William J. 
McCaughan, I was most cordially received by Dr. Morison 
and his family, enjoying their genial hospitality and attend- 
ing the historic Church (St. David's), of which he was then 
Minister. 

John Archibald Morison was born March 10, 1867, at 
Melbourne Ridge, in the Province of Quebec, Canada, of 
Scotch and English parentage. His preliminary education 
was obtained at Huntington Academy, under the charge of 
his uncle, the Rev. David W. Morison, D. D., and of the 
Rev. Professor Geors^e Weir. D. D. Air. Morison entered 



266 JOHN ARCHIBALD MORI SON. 

McGill University in 1884, graduating in 1888; thence 
to the Montreal Presbyterian College for his theological 
studies, graduating in 1891, He was licensed to preach by 
the Presbytery of Montreal, May 15, 1891, going later to the 
University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, for studies in ora- 
tory. In the autumn of 1892, Mr. Morison went to Edin- 
burgh, where he had a year of study at the University un- 
der Professors Flint, Caldervvood, and Dods.^ Upon his 
return to Canada, Mr. Morison was called to the Knox 
Church, Listowel, to which charge he was inducted Febru- 
ary 3, 1893. In this Church, the senior Elder was John Liv- 
ingstone, elder brother of David Livingstone, missionary 
and explorer. In July, 189-1, he was installed Minister of 
East Church, Toronto, continuing with this Church until 
September, 1898. 

In 1895, while still with the East Church of Toronto, he 
entered the post-graduate department of the University of 
Wooster, Ohio, taking a three-year course in extra-mural 
studies, receiving from the University the degrees of M, A. 
and Ph. D. 

In October, 1898, Dr. Morison entered the University 
of Berlin, remaining until January, 1899, when he went to 
Oxford, England, for work with Professors Driver and 
Cheyne, Upon his return to Canada, he was called to St. 
David's Church of St. John, where he was installed De- 
cember 1, 1899. 

Dr. Morison was for some time Chaplain of St. An- 
drew's Society in Toronto, and Honorary Secretary of the 
Upper Canada Religious Tract and Book Society, of which 
he is now Vice-President. 

He was married September 11, 189-4, to Clara Jeannette, 
second daughter of the late John Nichol, M. D., of Listowel, 

Dr, Morison came to Chicago in January, 1904, at the 
invitation of the Pastoral Committee, preaching Sunday 
morning, January 10, in the Kenwood Evangelical Church 

» The Rev. William John McCaughan (Third Presbyterian Church, Chicago) and 
the Rev. William Robson Notman, D. D. (Fourth Presbyterian Church, Chicago), 
studied with Marcus Dods of New College, Edinburgh. 



JOHN ARCHIBALD MORI SON. 267 

on the subject, ''Christ, the Head of the Church," and in the 
evening at the Forty-first Street Presbyterian Church, tak- 
ing for his theme, "No IMan Cared for My Soul." 

On Wednesday evening, January 27, at a meeting of 
the members of the First Church and Society, a formal call 
was extended to the Rev. John A. Morison, Ph. D., to be- 
come the Minister of the Church. Messrs. Samuel Baker, 
Ernest A. Hamill, and Philo A. Otis were appointed a com- 
mittee to prosecute the call. 

Dr. Morison, in his letter of acceptance, February 29, 
1904, said: 

"Let me say that I freely acknowledge the distin- 
guished honor that has been conferred upon me, and the 
large confidence you have been led to place in myself in hav- 
ing thus invited me to become to you and your children, 
a Minister of Christ. 

"The history and traditions of your Church amply re- 
pay an earnest and sympathetic consideration, and my dis- 
position will ever be to remember the former and respect 
the latter. 

"My purpose and desire is to be with you on Easter 
Day, and my prayer is that our fellowship and service at 
that time and always may be in the power of His resurrec- 
tion." 

A great audience came to the Old First Church, that 
lovely Easter morning, April 3, 1904, to welcome the new 
Minister. 

The Chicago Journal of ]Monday following said of this 
service : 

"It was an ideal Easter service. Minister and people 
and musicians were enrapt with the Easter spirit. A vast 
content sat upon the great assembly, while the sun rays, 
softened by the tinted windows, fell like blessings upon faces 
which mirrored happy thoughts. 

"The preacher's prayer and his sermon Avere not over- 
long. But they were both fervent and sincere and breathed 
of a hopeful, a strengthful, and a trustful spirit. T shall not 
die, but live,' he quoted as the burden of the Easter message. 
And — 'Life is a mystery,' said he. Tt must have a 
revelation.' What more could have been said to encourage 
faith in Christianity, which is all a revelation? 

"He painted God as an artist, who drew in our lives 
lines of joy and sorrow, pain and surcease, leaving us won- 



26S JOHN ARCHIBALD M ORISON. 

dering at the strangeness of His ways and the meaning of 
His visitations, until the picture was completed — and then 
the revelation of His purpose. 

"As the Minister spoke, the boyishness left his face. 
His whole being vibrated with the fervor of his words — 
nay, of his convictions. His movements were graceful and 
unstudied. There was no unpleasant ranting, no posing for 
effect, no conscious oratorical display. He spoke straightly, 
earnestly, in tones without harshness and yet which reached 
every ear in the Church." 

As a preacher. Dr. Morison was forceful and eloquent, 
taking as the fountain of his inspiration the Holy Scrip- 
tures. He was especially happy in his exposition of Bible 
truths and the great doctrines of the Christian Creed. 

As a Minister, he enthused new life into the Men's 
League, an organization for bringing the men into closer 
touch with the various departments of Church life. One 
delightful feature of every winter was the monthly meeting 
of the Fort Dearborn Guild, organized by Dr. Morison early 
in his ministry, for bringing the women of the Church to- 
gether, that they might work to better advantage in mission 
and hospital causes. 

The Special Musical Services, for large Choir with in- 
struments, for increasing the interest in the Sunday morning 
worship, were at the suggestion of Dr. Morison. His cordial 
sympathy and quiet support were at all times of great as- 
sistance to the Music Committee. 

He was a Trustee of the Ryder Fund, created by the 
will of the Rev. W. H. Ryder, D. D., Minister of the First 
Universalist (St. Paul's) Society. Dr. Ryder died March 7, 
1888, leaving ten thousand dollars to a Board of Trustees, 
consisting of the Ministers of the First Universalist, First 
Presbyterian, and First Congregational Churches, Mayor of 
the City of Chicago and Superintendent of Public Schools in 
said city. The income from said Fund to be devoted to de- 
livering a series of lectures in the interest of the moral and 
social welfare of the citizens of Chicago. Dr. Morison was 
efficient and aggressive in the work of this Board. 



JOHN ARCHIBALD MORISON. 269 

He received the degree of D.D. on April 3, 1907, from 
the Presbyterian College of Montreal, and was present on 
the occasion, making an address to the students. 

His interest in the Presbyterian Hospital, of whose 
Clerical Board he was chairman, has always been felt and 
recognized. 

The Diamond Jubilee (1908) and the Commemorative 
Endowment Fund had their initiative with Dr. Morison. 
Early in his ministry, he foresaw the necessity of the Church 
having an endowment, whereby its future might be as- 
sured. He suggested a systematic plan for developing the 
fund, and the agreement with the Northern Trust Company, 
who should hold and invest all moneys received, so that 
no part of the principal would ever be used, but that the 
income therefrom would be available for the maintenance 
of the Church. 

Dr. Alorison presented his resignation to the Session of 
the Church, Saturday evening, June 11, 1910 : 

"I have called this meeting of the Session tonight for 
the purpose of placing in the hands of yourselves, my hon- 
ored colleagues, my resignation as pastor of our dear 
Church, with the earnest request that you accept the same 
forthwith, to take effect July 3, 1910, and lovingly co-operate 
with me in fulfilling what must be done to speedily effect my 
release from the pastorate of this Church. 

"For some time past, the thought has been borne in me 
that ere long I must take this step, and I assure you that at 
the present time, after much prayerful consideration, I am 
led to believe that the present season calls for this decision. 

"During the past six years, we have learned to labor to- 
gether in God's Kingdom, and our large undertakings, both 
in our Home Church and in Railroad Chapel, have been 
prospered and blessed. Indeed, it has been said that this 
last year our various Church organizations and Societies 
have been unusually successful. That it is so, is largely due 
to the beautiful spirit of Christian serv'ice so universally 
represented by the officiary of our Church, supported by a 
loyal membership. 

"In taking leave of you, let me assure you of our most 
aflFectionate regard and let me also beg that you convey this 
same assurance to all our people." 



270 JOHN ARCHIBALD MORISON. 

At a meeting of the Church and Society, Wednesday- 
evening, June 22, 1910, the resignation of the Rev. John Archi- 
bald Morison, D. D., was read and accepted. Resolutions 
from the various Boards in the Church were passed, express- 
ing the affectionate regard in which Dr. Morison was held 
by his people and in acknowledgment of his exceptional abil- 
ity as theologian and preacher. 

Mr. S. Leonard Boyce, on behalf of the Session, said: 

"Dr. Morison came to Us from Saint David's Church, St. 
John, N. B., Canada, on April 3, 1904, so that last spring he 
completed the sixth year of his ministry. During these years, 
he has by his genial manner, lovable personality, and Christian 
character, greatly endeared himself to his co-workers in the 
Session, not only as a Minister, but as a counsellor and friend ; 
always kind and attentive and keenly sympathetic in times of 
sorrow and perplexity. As Moderator, he has ever presided at 
our meetings with such rare tact and fidelity to the future 
welfare of our Church and all its Christian activities, that it 
has been a great pleasure to have the privilege of being so in- 
timately associated with him during these years. It has always 
given the Session the highest satisfaction to support him and 
do everything to aid him in carrying on the good work of ad- 
vancing the cause of the Kingdom and building up this, our 
beloved Church. He has ever been our dignified leader and 
spiritual guide, and we have gladly followed where he led. As 
a scholar and thoughtful student of the Bible, his utterances 
from the pulpit have been uplifting and helpful, and he has ever 
preached Christ and His redeeming power. We have always 
felt helped by his message of God's love and better fitted to 
meet life's responsibilities." 

On December 18, 1911, the Presbytery of Chicago took 
the following action : 

"In responding to the request of the Rev. John A. Morison, 
D. D., for a letter of dismissal to the Presbytery of Mon- 
treal, the Presbytery of Chicago desires to express its hearty 
appreciation of his character and services as a man, a Min- 
ister, and a Presbyter during the six years of his residence 
and fellowship with us. 

"As a Minister, he was able and scholarly, loyal to the 
teachings and mission of our Lord Jesus Christ, with signal 
interest in and influence over the young, leading his people 
to higher ideals and more generous service of Christ. 



JOHN ARCHIBALD M ORISON. 271 

''As a Pastor, he was honored and beloved for his tender 
sympathy, his hearty helpfulness, and for his wise and efifec- 
tive leadership in Christian Endeavor and in the Railroad 
Mission work. 

"This man of God and servant of Jesus Christ will be 
greatly missed from many circles of philanthropic and Chris- 
tian service in our city and Presbytery. 

"Our heartfelt prayers follow him in the hope and con- 
fidence that it will please God to use him yet more abun- 
dantly in the service of Christ and His Church and King- 
dom. 

"This minute to be placed on the records of Presbytery 
and a copy of same to be sent to Dr. Morison and to the 
Presbytery of Montreal." 

Presented by Dr. Freeman, seconded by Dr. Beattie, 
and heartily adopted by Presbytery. 

Dr. Morison is now (1913) Minister of the First Presby- 
terian Church of West St. John, N. B., Canada. 



272 JOHN NEWTON FREEMAN. 

JOHN NEWTON FREEMAN, MINISTER 
IN CHARGE 

Few pages in English history are more tragic than those 
pertaining to the revolt in 1857 of the Bengal troops against 
English rule, and the horrors which ensued at Delhi, Luck- 
now, and Cawnpore. The Indian Mutiny is of interest to us 
at this point in the history of the First Church. Among the 
martyrs of the Mutiny were the father and second mother 
of him who for the past two years has been our beloved 
Minister in Charge— -John Newton Freeman. 

Stanley A. Hunter, of Princeton Hall, Allahabad Chris- 
tian College, in a pamphlet entitled "A Princeton Martyr 
and the Indian Mutiny," tells the story of the massacre: 

"To the Englishman, Cawnpore is hallowed ground, on 
account of the noble band of Mutiny martyrs who suffered 
there in 1857. It should be also to the American. Few re- 
alize that in the long list of names carved in marble in the 
beautiful Memorial Church, eight American missionaries are 
numbered ; none were braver hearts than the eight of the 
Presbyterian Mission. 

"Recently in Allahabad, an Indian preacher told the 
story of their death as it had come to him from the lips of 
an old man, who, as a boy, had been present as an eye-wit- 
ness to the tragedy. The little Christian lad remembered a 
brief address and prayer which one had offered just before 
the Sepoys' guns did their fatal work. The man who thus 
prayed was John Edgar Freeman. 

"Born at Orange, N. J., in 1809, and graduated from 
Princeton College in 1835, he later entered the Princeton 
Theological Seminary and graduated in 1838. In a letter 
written while at sea on his way to India, he gave the facts 
of his early life, and a statement as to the motives which 
led him to missionary work. There was at Princeton, when 
he entered, a strong interest in the foreign field. Morison, 
who was in the class ahead, had decided to offer himself 
for India. Dougherty, who went to the American Indians, 
and Canfield, later of Africa, were his associates. The de- 
parture for India took place October 12, 1838, shortly after 
his marriage to Miss Mary Ann Beach of Newark, N. J. The 
voyage then took one hundred and twenty-one days, while 
one month now is sufficient for the journey, with nine days 
to spend on the Continent between Liverpool and Mar- 




IHN NEWTON I'REEMAN 



JOHN NEWTON FREEMAN. 273 

seilles. Their destination reached, the two proceeded to 
Allahabad to learn the lans^uage and manage the Orphan 
School for boys and girls. Ten years later, in August, 1849, 
Mrs. Freeman's splendid work was cut short by sudden 
death, and Mr. Freeman returned to America with his young 
son, John Newton Freeman. While on a furlough, he was 
married to Miss Elizabeth Vredenburgh of Elizabethtown, 
N. J., the descendant of one who played an important part 
in the Revolutionary War. 

"On their return to India, Mr. and Mrs. Freeman were 
stationed at Mainpuri, some six hundred miles up country 
from Calcutta, where they worked pleasantly and happily for 
four years. A year before the Mutiny, they were transferred 
to Fatehgarh, thirty-five miles away. Letters from the 
Freemans are preserved, giving details of life at Fatehgarh, 
which show the utmost devotion to their work. But signs 
of discontent were already apparent among- the Sepoys. 
The last letter from Mrs. Freeman, written in June, 1857, 
shows that 'in the midst of danger she was full of courage.' 
She writes to her sister: 

" 'We have received intelligence that four companies 
of the Ninth Regiment have mutinied, and, after murder- 
ing all the English, have started for Fatehgarh. We are in 
God's hands ; I sometimes think our deaths would be of 
more good than we can do in all our lives.' On June 4, 
the missionaries, with some European planters, started for 
Allahabad Fort for safety, going in boats on the Ganges. 
A few miles above Cawnpore, half way to their destination, 
the boats grounded on some shallows. Here for three days 
they were marooned on an island exposed to fire from the 
guns of the Sepoys. Worn out with heat and exposure, all 
were ready to die, except Freeman. They were finally 
captured by a boatload of armed troops, dragged into the 
presence of Nana Sahib, 'the fiend incarnate of the Mutiny,' 
and as the sun arose next day, the one hundred and sixty 
refugees were all shot in cold blood. 

"In the Chapel of Allahabad Christian College, the son, 
three grandsons, and great-grandson are erecting a Memorial 
for John Edgar Freeman. A tablet in the Rakka Church at 
Fatehgarh is the Memorial of the eight American mission- 
aries who died with the other Fatehgarh refugees at 
Cawnpore." 

The son, John Newton, who so providentially escaped 
the fate of his martyred parents in India, was brought up 
in America. He was graduated from Princeton in 1863, 



274 JOHN NEWTON FREEMAN. 

and from Princeton Seminary in 1868. With the close of 
his student days, he entered the ministry, serving suc- 
cessively in the following Churches : First Presbyterian, 
Peekskill, N. Y. ; First Presbyterian, Lockport, N. Y. ; Im- 
manuel Presbyterian, Milwaukee, Wis.; Central Presby- 
terian, Denver, Colo., and Calvary Presbyterian, Cleve- 
land, O. 

In 1891, Princeton conferred on him, honoris causa, the 
degree of D. D. In 1901, Dr. Freeman withdrew from the 
active pastorate, and after four years of special work in 
New York City, removed with his family to make a perma- 
nent home in Chicago. In 1905, he was chosen Associate 
Minister with Dr. W. R. Notman in the Fourth Presby- 
terian Church. After Dr. Notman's resignation in 1908, 
Dr. Freeman became Minister in Charge of the Fourth 
Church, serving in this relation until Dr. John Timothy 
Stone was installed as Minister, June 3, 1909; continuing 
as Associate Minister with Dr. Stone until January 1, 1910. 

Affter the departure of Dr. Morison (July, 1910), while 
the question of permanent supply was being seriously con- 
sidered by our Session, Dr. Freeman was requested to preach 
a few Sundays, commencing September 11. Many of the 
Congregation were old friends, having known Dr. Freeman 
and his work with the Fourth Church and other places, and 
all were delighted to find him in the pulpit in the autumn 
months. The bulletin of October 9, contained this an- 
noucement : 

"The Session and Trustees are pleased to announce 
that definite arrangements have been made with Dr. Free- 
man to act as Minister in Charge of our Church pending 
definite future plans. Dr. Freeman will not only fill our 
pulpit Sabbath mornings, but will take charge of our regu- 
lar Church work, including the leadership of our mid-week 
prayer service." 

It was a serious time in the affairs of the First Church. 
No one knew what course to take in this troubled sea of 
uncertainty. It was our good fortune that Dr. Freeman 
was at that time at liberty and could come to us as Minister 
in Charge. By his winning personality, his powers as a 



JOHN NEWTON FREEMAN. 275 

preacher, and tact in meeting the delicate and difficult mat- 
ters which were then arising- in our Church life, he kept the 
members together during the next two years, until the con- 
solidation with the Forty-first Street Presbyterian Church 
was definitely concluded, December 31, 1912. At the ear- 
nest request of Dr. Covert, the Minister, and of the Session 
and Trustees of the First Church, Dr. Freeman continued 
as Associate Minister until July 1, 1913. 



OFFICERS. 



FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 



OFFICERS 

1900. 

(First Edition of this History.) 

The Rev. William J. Chichester, D. D., Minister. 

SESSION. 

Franklin Ames. Hamilton Borden. 

Samuel Baker. Henry W. Dudley. 

Addison Ballard. Henry H. Munger. 

Charles L. Bingham. Henry D. Penfield. 

William H. Swift. 

deacons. 
Charles Alling, Jr. Earl C. Greenman. 

Henry M. Bacon. William A. Magie. 

Walter Frazer Brown. George W. S. Matheson. 

Tracy C. Drake. Josiah W. Ferine. 

Alexander H. Seelye. 

TRUSTEES. 
Tracy C. Drake. William E. KellEy. 

Marshall Field. William H. Swift. 

Caryl Young. 

committee on music. 

Philo Adams Otis. Charles D. Irwin. 

William H. Swift. 

sexton. 

Charles Hugo Koehring. 



1912. 
The Rev. John Newton Freeman, D. D. 
Minister in Charge. 
session. 
Charles Alling, Jr. A. C. DePoy. 

Charles E. Baker. James M. Emery. 

Albert L. Berry. Henry H. Munger. 

S. Leonard Boyce. Philo Adams Otis. 

Henry W. Dudley. Josiah W. Ferine. 

CLERK of session. 

Henry H. AIunger, 
2818 Calumet Avenue. 



OFFICERS. 277 

DEACONS. 

James C. Ames. William A. Magie. 

Henry C. Davis. William Sumner Smith. 

Earl C. Greenman. Alfred Verxon. 

Henry J. Magee. Bradford Wells. 

Eugene Wendnagle. 
treasurer of benevolent contributions. 
William Sumner Smith, 
trustees. 
S. Leonard Boyce. Philo Adams Otis. 

E. C. Greenman. Charles T. Otis. 

William Sumner Smith. 

treasurer of the church. 

Charles T. Otis. 

young people's mission association. 

Ch.arles T. Otis, Treasurer. 

diamond jubilee commemorative fund. 
Lucius J. Otis, Treasurer. 

committee on music. 
Philo Adams Otis. Francis S. Moore. 

Ernest A. Hamill. 

sexton. 
William F. Bogner.^ 



Mr. Bogner is now (1913) Sexton of the Second Presbyterian Church. 



278 FORTY-FIRST ST. PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

THE FORTY-FIRST STREET PRESBY- 
TERIAN CHURCH 

"The history of the Forty-first Street Presbyterian 
Church has been that of one of the most fruitful Churches 
in the Chicag-o Presbytery. Previous to its organization, 
religious work was carried on in Christian homes in the 
neighborhood, and also in a small structure erected (1869) 
on the rear of a lot at the corner of Prairie avenue and 
Foi'ty-first street. The First Presbyterian Churdh was 
the fostering parent of the new enterprise, and provided 
money and workers during the years of its dependency. 
The early work of the Presbytery was carried on by the 
Presbyterian League of Chicago. The beginnings of the 
Church are to be traced to a Sunday-school organized in 
the late autumn of 1869, by Mrs. Lewis W. Stone, in her 
home at 4316 Michigan avenue, and maintained by her 
and her helpers until a permanent Church organization was 
ready to accept the responsibility. At the organization of 
the Church, February 14, 1875, the Presbytery of Chicago 
was represented by the Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., the 
Rev. E. R. Davis, and the Rev. E. P. Wells. 

"There were nineteen charter members, as follows : Mr. 
and Mrs. John Hayes, Mr. and Mrs. Irus Coy, Mrs. L. B. 
Kelsey, Mrs. Elmira Emery, Mrs. E. P. Wells, Mrs. L. 
W. Stone, Mrs. S. C. Broad, Mrs. G. A. Follansbee, Mr. 
and Mrs. S. D. Foss, Mrs. F. W. Springer, Mr. L. S. 
Pierce, Mrs. G. A. Springer, Mrs. Elvira , Pierce, Mrs. 
Asahel Pierce, Dr. W. M. Boyd, and Mrs. G. W. Pierce. 

"The Session for the first two years consisted of Mr. 
S. D. Foss. A Board of Trustees, consisting of Mr. S. D. 
Foss, Mr. Wm. L. Moss, Jr., Mr. J. W. Towne, Mr. F. W. 
Springer, and Mr. G. A. Springer was elected in the autumn 
of 1871. The Society was organized and called the Calvary 
Religious Society, which name it held until the organiza- 
tion of the Forty-first Street Presbyterian Church in 1875. 

"Among the earliest superintendents of the Sunday 



FORTY-FIRST ST. PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 279 

School, are enrolled the names of Mrs. L. W. Stone, Mr. L. S. 
Pierce, Mr. G. F. Bissell, and Mr. James E. Detebaugh. 

"The first pastorate began with the installation of the 
Rev. E. P. Wells, May 23, 1875; the Rev. J. Munro Gibson, 
D. D., presided; the Rev. James H. Taylor, D. D., preached 
the sermon ; the Rev. D. S. Johnson gave the charge to the 
pastor, and the Rev. Charles L. Thompson, D. D., the charge 
to. the people. The pastorate of Mr. Wells terminated 
April 1, 1878. The Rev. Arthur Swazey, D. D., became the 
stated supply, remaining until July 1, 1883. 

'Tn November, 1883, the Rev. Robert Bruce Clark be- 
gan his pastorate, and the Church for the first time assumed 
self-support. Mr. Clark concluded his work September 
29, 1885. He was followed by the Rev. Thomas Cuming 
Hall, D. D., who was installed on November 4, 1886, serv- 
ing the Church until February, 1893. On December 14, 
1893, the Rev. Howard Agnew Johnston, D. D., was in- 
stalled Minister, and continued until 1899. After a pastor- 
less period of two and one-half years, the Rev. Cleland Boyd 
McAfee, D. D., was called and began his work in September, 
1901, remaining until July, 1904. The present Minister, 
the Rev. William Chalmers Covert, D. D., began his pastor- 
ate March 1, 1905. 

"The edifice of the Forty-first Street Church, together 
with its other property, cost $115,000. The corner-stone 
was laid in October, 1889; the building dedicated December 
21, 1890, the Rev. John Hall. D. D., preaching the dedicatory 
sermon. A debt of $50,000 was incurred in order to secure 
a building adequate to meet the demands of the growing com- 
munity. In a few months, $15,000 was paid, leaving $35,000 
due. On Sunday morning, October 28, 1906, the sum of 
$30,000 in pledges was received, which with the pledges pre- 
viously secured, provided for the entire indebtedness. Amidst 
tears of joy and gratitude, the large audience sang 'Praise God 
from Whom All Blessings Flow.' The year 1907 witnessed 
the payment of all the pledges and the cancellation of the in- 
debtedness. 



280 FORTY-FIRST ST. PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

"The culmination of months of negotiation and planning 
was reached on Sunday morning, December 29, 19:^, when 
the people of the First and Forty-first Street Presbyterian 
Churches worshipped together in one final notable service 
in the old building at Twenty-first street and Indiana ave- 
nue. The Christmas music provided was probably the 
most magnificent presentation of instrumental and choral 
work ever heard in Chicago, in connection with a Church 
service. The Cantata, 'Wondrous Words of Love,' for 
solo voices, chorus, orchestra, and organ, was given under 
the direction of the composer. Elder Philo Adams Otis," 
(From "The Church News," January, 1913.) 

The first Choir (1874) of the Forty-first Street Presby- 
terian Church was a quartette : 

Mrs. Lewis N. Stone (S.), Miss Mary May Hubbard 
(A.), Mr. John Rattenbury (T.), Mr. Milton Palm (B.), 
Mr. J. H. B. Henderson (O.). 

Other members from 1874 to 1912 : 

Organists : Miss Elizabeth Lamson, Miss Charlotte 
Dodd, Miss Anna Carhart, Mr. Henry Howenstein, Miss 
Mary Peirce, Mr. Frank Hazen, Mr. Victor Garwood, and 
Mr. C. H. Demorest. 

Sopranos: Mrs. L. J. Lamson, Miss Jessie Carpenter, 
Miss Lucille Stevenson, Miss Mary Peck Thomson, Miss 
Eva E. Wycoff, and Miss Jeannette Durno. 

Altos : Mrs. C. A. Poole, Miss Alice Hayes, Miss Louise 
Blish, Miss Mae Plumb, IVIiss Elizabeth Fisher, and Miss 
Barbara Waite. 

Tenors: Mr. James L. Swift, Mr. William Hall, Mr. 
Alfred D. Shaw, and Mr. George A. Brewster. 

Basses: Mr. James S. Moore, Mr. Henry Poritz, Mr. 
John T. Read, and Mr. William G. Peirce. 

The Choir in December, 1912, prior to the consolida- 
tion with the First Church, was under the direction of Mr. 
Allan B. Benedict (O.) and consisted of Mrs. Beatrice F. 
Erlinger (S.) and Mr. Ben Q. Tufts (B.) as soloists, and 
the Choral Society of thirty voices. 



FORTY-FIRST ST. PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 281 

OFFICERS 
1912 

The Rev. William Chalmers Covert, D. D., Minister. 

SESSION. 

Charles L. Boyd. Alexander H. Lowden. 

B. O. Cowan. Walter R. ^Iee. 

Hugh S. Foster. William Lathrop ^Ioss. 

O. S. Gilbert. Henry H. McLane. 

Charles A. Heath. Ernest S. Stough. 

S. O. Knudson. Archibald H. Wilson. 

clerk of session. 
William Lathrop ^Ioss.^ 

Highland Park, 111. 

deacons. 

A. P. Ballou. Fred A. Dow. 

Tames L. Baldwin. T. A. Galt. 

Harry A. Brinkman. Daniel C. Gordon. 

Alfred A. Chichester. Fred E. Haines. 

Harry L. Carpenter. Frederick C. Harper. 

William A. Capron. C. E. Lasure. 

BOARD of trustees. 

Charles A. Heath. Warren A. Lamson. 

Dr. W. M. Harsha. R. E. Pratt. 

E. O. Heyl. a. C. Terry. 

E. K. Herrick.' Alfred C. Tyler. 

Dr. I. E. Haskell. Thomas E. Wells, H. 

S. O. Knudson. Thomas E. Wilson. 

church treasurer. 

A. C. Terry, 

4217 Grand Boulevard. 

Sunday-school. 
SupT., Mr. Walter R. IMee. 
Ass't Supt., Mr. Charles A. Heath. 
Secy., Miss Alice S. Wilde, 
music committee. 
Mrs. E. O. Heyl, Mrs. William C. Covert. 
Charles A. Heath. The Rev. William C. Covert, D. D. 



'Mr. Moss died May 13, 1913. at Highland Park, Illinois. 

2 Mr. E. K. Herrick died March 3, 1913. He had been an earnest worker in the 
Forty-first Street Church for twenty-nine years. 



282 THE CONSOLIDATED CHURCHES. 



THE CONSOLIDATED FIRST AND FORTY-FIRST 
STREET PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES, HERE- 
AFTER KNOWN AS THE FIRST 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Dr. Barrows was one of the first to foresee that in the 
tremendous growth of this city, the entire district adjacent 
to the edifice at Twenty-first street and Indiana avenue 
would soon be needed for business and not for homes. 
He again and again urged the Session and the Trustees 
to be forehanded and secure a location farther south for 
the future home of the Church. In a letter dated April 29, 
1895, written to every member of the Session, he expressed 
the fear : 

"That the First Church would delay its removal so 
long as to miss the best opportunities presented by the 
growing population south of Thirty-ninth street." 

In 1897, every friend of the Church realized that its 
income was steadily diminishing, and that the character of 
the membership was changing; new families were not com- 
ing into the Church; death and removal were making sad 
inroads among the older members. 

A meeting w^as held on Monday evening, December 16, 
1901, at the residence of Mr. Ernest A. Hamill, at which 
were present the Trustees and members of the Session and 
Congregation. Mr. William H, Swift, President of the 
Board of Trustees, presented a statement of the finances 
of the Society, which showed clearly that the time had come 
when the future of the Church must be seriously considered. 
Three questions were settled at this meeting: 

1. That the location of the Church should not be 
changed at present. 

2. That the building should be put in thorough repair, 
both as to exterior and interior; and 

3. That the Trustees might use the purchase money 
received from the sale of the R. R. Mission property to the 
African M. E. Church for such purposes as the Trustees 
thought for the best interests of the Society. 




FIRST PRKSHV 
Indiana Avenue a:id T 



;rian" ciukch. 

nlv-i'irsl Si reel (I 



THE COSSOLI DATED CHURCHES. 283 

The latter resolution was unanimously agreed to by 
the men present, as they represented a large majority of 
those who gave the money with which the Chapel was 
built in 1891. The Trustees were, therefore, perfectly 
justified in using this fund for the maintenance of the 
Church. 

In accordance with the second resolution, the building 
was thoroughly renovated in the summer of 1902, a large 
portion of the cost having been raised by subscription 
through the efforts of Dr. and Mrs. Chichester. 

One great need in the First Church has been a sys- 
tematic method of finance, whereby the maintenance of the 
Church services and the care of the property should be of 
equal importance with the benevolent causes. Prior to 
1910 (when the envelope system for "Church Support" was 
introduced), the Sunday plate collections, aggregating over 
$1,000,000 in the past fifty years, had been given to the 
regular Boards, exclusive of gifts by individual members 
of the Congregation to schools, colleges, and city charities. 
Not a dollar of the Sunday offerings had ever been applied 
towards "Church Support." In the meantime, the Trustees 
were often without funds with which to meet current ex- 
penses, in consequence of the uncertain, inadequate income 
from pew rentals. Undoubtedly these large plate collec- 
tions have been of the greatest good in extending mission 
work at home and abroad and in promoting other worthy 
causes; but one cannot evade the thought that some of 
this money could have been equally well employed in pro- 
viding for the future of our beloved Church. It does seem 
incredible that in the period of our greatest prosperity, be- 
tween the Jubilee (1883) and the Diamond Jubilee (1908), 
the question of an endowment was not even considered. 
The Boards needed money, the people of the First Church 
were large givers, so the question of an endowment was 
laid aside and the money bestowed in meeting the immedi- 
ate demands of other Presbyterian interests. 

The inexorable laws of sound finance are often hard 
and cruel, but thev are as unalterable as "the laws and cus- 



284 THE CONSOLIDATED CHURCHES. 

toms Moses delivered us." Over $1,000,000 given away, 
and no provision for an endowment! This should be an 
object lesson to every Church in the Chicago Presbytery, 

To Dr. Morison must be given the credit for the sug- 
gestion of the Diamond Jubilee (1908) and the Com- 
memorative Fund. In 1906 the attendance at the Church 
services and income from pew rentals had declined to such 
a point as to demand serious consideration by the Trustees 
and Session. The membership had not decreased so much 
in numbers, as in character and quality. The First Church 
reported to the Presbytery, April 1, 1896, five months after 
the resignation of Dr. Barrows, a membership of 721 ; April 
1, 1899—789; April 1, 1905—710. But the members in 1905 
were not home dwellers. They came from the restless, chang- 
ing population, characteristic of the metropolis — the flotsam 
and jetsam of human life in great cities. Dr. Morison was 
the first to consider this condition of afifairs, and he urged 
upon the men the necessity of securing at once an income for 
the future needs of the Church ; but no action was taken until 
December 6, 1908 (Diamond Jubilee), when through his 
efforts an offering of $26,000 was secured toward the 
Commemorative Fund. By action of the Session, the offer- 
ing on the third Sunday in December of each year must 
be added to the Fund, together with twenty per cent of the 
plate collections on other Sundays. The Commemorative 
Fund has not increased as the Trustees had reason to 
expect. At the Annual Meeting of the Society in December, 
1910, the Treasurer of the Fund, Mr. Lucius J. Otis, re- 
ported a total of $37,000 (including the $10,000 legacy from 
the will of Mrs. Daniel A. Jones), an increase of only $2,000 
in two years from a Congregation which gave to the Boards 
$20,000 in the same period. The Fund is now (1913) $39,600. 

With the resignation (1910) of Dr. Morison, the future 
of the Church certainly was not clear. The income from a 
Fund of $37,000 could not meet the annual deficit, and 
the time for the adoption of a new policy was now at hand. 
On November 29, 1910, a meeting was held in the rooms 
of the Presbytery, at which were present Trustees, Elders, 



THE CONSOLIDATED CHURCHES. 285 

Deacons, and members from the Congregation. Mr. Ernest 
A. Hamill was called to the chair, and the whole subject 
of the future of the Church was thoroughly discussed. On 
motion, the chairman was requested to appoint a committee 
of five, one from the Session, one from the Trustees, one 
from the Deacons, and two from the Congregation, to make 
an exhaustive study of the situation, and to report to the Ses- 
sion at an early date. Mr. Hamill made the following 
appointments: Messrs. S. Leonard Boyce, Chairman (Ses- 
sion), Philo Adams Otis (Trustees), Bradford Wells 
(Deacons), J. W. Janney, and Byron L. Smith (Congrega- 
tion). This committee, known as the "Committee on 
Recommendation and Investigation," gave two years of 
thought to the subject, carefully considering every plan 
possible for the future of the First Church, with due regard 
to the preservation of its name and corporate existence. 
Early in 1912, the Session added to the committee Messrs. 
Charles Ailing, A. L. Berry, William M. Derby, and Henry 
W. Dudley. The new committee had several meetings with 
a committee from the Forty-first Street Presbyterian 
Church, consisting of Mr. Charles A. Heath, Dr. William 
M. Harsha, and the Rev. William C. Covert, D. D. (Minister). 
On May 31, 1912, the joint committee from both Churches 
met at the Northern Trust Company and agreed on a basis 
of union. The committee of the First Church made its 
report accordingly: (1) to the Session on June 3, 1912; (2) 
to the Trustees, June 7, 1912, by which Boards the report 
was unanimously received and adopted; and (3) to a special 
meeting of the Church and Society, on Wednesday evening, 
June 19, 1912. 

The notices sent for this meeting contained ballots for 
each member to sign, "for" or "against" the union, and 
requested such ballots to be returned, sealed, prior to June 18, 
1912. to :\Ir. Henry H. Munger. clerk of the Session. 

The eventful evening having arrived, Mr. Henry W. 
Dudley was called to the chair, with Mr. Henry H. Munger 
as clerk. The report of the committee wacs then pre- 
sented by the Chairman, Mr. S. Leonard Boyce, who ex- 



286 THE CONSOLIDATED CHURCHES. 

plained the advantages to be gained and urged upon the 
members present that their ballots be given for the union. 
The clerk was about to announce the result of the ballot- 
ing, when Miss Helen V. Drake arose and begged consent 
of the meeting to allow the women to work on a plan they 
had in mind for building a new Church in Kenwood. Miss 
Margaretta E. Otis then stated that she had received pledges 
aggregating the sum of $51,000 towards the erection of the 
proposed Church. 

After discussion it was voted to postpone action on the 
report until the annual meeting of the Church and Society 
on Monday evening, December 2. 

A committee of five women and four men was there- 
upon appointed to solicit subsctiptions for the erection of 
a new Church in Kenwood: Miss Helen V. Drake, Chair- 
man; Miss Margaretta E. Otis, Treasurer; Mrs. Sidney 
Starbuck, Miss Leila Brown, Mrs. Charles Burr, Mr. Henry 
M. Curtis, Mr. William M. Derby, Mr. James W. Janney, 
and Mr. James C. Ames. 

On Monday evening, December 2, 1912, Miss Helen 
V. Drake, chairman of the new building committee, presented 
her report: 

"Although we have not succeeded in raising the sum 
needed, each member of this Committee is glad that he or 
she made the effort; we have the satisfaction of knowing 
that we have tried to do what seemed to be our duty as well 
as our pleasure, our reward being the privilege of sitting a 
few more times in our beloved family pews, which, with 
some of us, have come next to our own homes during the 
past forty years, and enjoying the ideal service of music and 
Gospel Truth, in the beautiful "afterglow of vanished days." 

Miss Margaretta E. Otis, Treasurer, then reported that 
the total amount subscribed for the new building was 
$82,879.95, hardly more than one-half the sum asked for. The 
sincere thanks of the meeting were then voted to Miss 
Drake and her associates on the building committee, who 
had given so much time and thought to a w^ork which had 
been with them a labor of love. 



THE CONSOLIDATED CHURCHES. 287 

The report of the "Committee on Recommendation and 
Investigation" being then in order and the ballots having 
been cast in favor of the union of the First and Forty-first 
Street Presbyterian Churches, the consolidation was then 
effected. The provisions of the consolidation, as outlined 
in the report of the committee, June 14, 1912, are: 

"I. That the First Presbyterian Church and Society 
move to the Church edifice of the Forty-first Street Presby- 
terian Church at the corner of Grand boulevard and Forty- 
first street without any change of name or in its identity. 

"11. That if found practical, all our memorial windows 
and tablets, upon consent of the donors, together with fur- 
niture and organ, be moved to that Church ; 

"III. That the entire membership of the Forty-first 
Street Church, amounting to 900, be transferred by action 
of the Presbytery to our Church, and that the present 
Minister of the Forty-first Street Church be installed Min- 
ister of the united Churches ; 

"IV. That the members of all Boards and Committees 
of both Churches tender their resignations and new officers be 
elected by the united Church and Society ; 

"V. That all the property of the Forty-first Street 
Church, valued at $100,000, be conveyed to the First Church. 

"VI. That in event of the sale of the First Church prop- 
erty at the corner of Indiana avenue and Twenty-first 
street, the proceeds thereof be added to our Endowment 
Fund and be held and invested by the Northern Trust Com- 
pany, and the income thereof used for the maintenance and 
support of the First Church, and that the principal thereof 
be used only to apply upon the purchase of a new Church 
lot and the erection of a Church edifice thereon; and 

"VII. That the remainder of the purchase money of the 
Railroad Chapel property be invested and the entire net 
income thereof be used for the maintenance and general 
expense of carrying on the work of the Railroad Mission 
as long as it shall be carried on by the Church." 

The final service of consummation was held in the 
Forty-first Street Church on Monday night, December 30, 
at which time the First Church received the 943 members 
by letter from the Forty-first Street Church and elected 
Elders, Deacons, and Trustees comprising the Boards of the 



288 THE CONSOLIDATED CHURCHES. 

two Churches in the consolidation. To the Rev. William 
Chalmers Covert, D. D., was extended a call to become 
Minister of the First Church and to the Rev. John Newton 
Freeman, D. D., a call to be the Associate Minister. 

SESSION. 

Class of 1913 : Charli;s E. Baker, Albert L. Berry, Henry 

W. Dudley, Hugh F. Foster, Joseph W. Ferine, 

and E. S. Stouc-h. 

Class of 1914: Charles Alling, Jr., S. Leonard Boyce, O. 

S. Gilbert, Charles A. Heath, and Henry H. Munger. 

Class of 1915: A. C. DePoy, S. O. Knudson, A. H. Low- 

den, Walter R. Mee, Philo Adams Otis, 

and CoL. James M. Emery. 

deacons. 

James C. Ames. Earl C. Greenman. 

J, L. Baldwin. F. E. Haines. 

A. P. Ballou. F. C. Harper. 

W. A. Capron. C. a. Lasure. 

H. L. Carpenter. Henry J. Magee. 

A. A. Chichester. William A. Magie. 

Henry C. Davis. William S. Smith. 

Thomas A. Galt. Alfred Vernon. 

D. C. Gordon. Bradford Wells. 

Eugene Wendnagle. 
board of trustees. 
S. Leonard Boyce. W. A. Lamson. 

Earl C. Greenman. Charles T. Otis. 

William M. Harsha. Philo Adams Otis. 

J. E. Haskell. William Sumner Smith. 

Charles A. Heath. Albert C. Terry. 

E. K. Herrick. T. E. Wells. 

E. O. Heyl. Thomas E. Wilson. 

treasurer of the church. 

Albert C. Terry. 

Mr. Terry, having taken up his residence in California, 

tendered his resignation to the Trustees on Monday evening, 

June 9, 1913, and was succeeded by Mr. Charles A. Heath. 

treasurer of benevolent funds. 

William Sumner Smith. 

treasurer of young people's mission association. 

Charles T. Otis. 



THE CONSOLIDATED CHURCHES. 289 

TREASURER OF DIAMOND JUBILEE COMMEMORATIVE FUND. 

Lucius J. Otis, 
committee on music. 
Philo a. Otis. Francis S. Moore. 

Ernest A. Hamile The Rev. W. C. Covert, D. D. 

The Rev. William C. Covert, D. D., having accepted 
the call from the First Church, was installed January 24, 
1913, as its ninth Minister, and the Rev. John Newton Free- 
man, D. D., as Associate Minister. 

On Sunday morning, March 16, Dr. Covert presented 
to the Congregation the plans he had long entertained re- 
garding the larger work for the new First Church on 
institutional lines. His theme was, "Ushering Jesus Into 
the City," based on the text, "And when He was come near. 
He beheld the city and wept over it." (St. Luke xix : 41.) 

"We need," said the Minister, "better accommodations 
for the Sunday-school, an enlarged and attractive Chapel 
for our mid-week prayer service, and a permanent home 
for the Minister." 

Pointing to the gallery, where one hundred and twelve 
boys were seated (one hundred and twelve strong arguments 
for the work in hand), the Minister added: 

"Our boys are asking for a gymnasium, reading room, 
and library. We must consider the physical as well as the 
moral needs of our sons, in order that they may have whole- 
some recreation amid proper surroundings." 

Early in April, 1913, the Trustees appointed a Build- 
ing and Improvement Committee: Messrs. S. Leonard 
Boyce, Chairman, Charles A. Heath, William Sumner 
Smith, Thomas E. Wilson, and Philo Adams Otis, to secure 
the necessary funds and proceed with the changes and altera- 
tions in the Forty-first Street edifice, so long desired by 
the people of this Church and community. On May 4, the 
bulletin announced that the Committee had purchased for 
$17,500 the premises, 4108 Grand Boulevard, south of and ad- 
joining the Church, as a home for the ^Minister, and to be 
known as the Manse. On May 15, the Committee, having se- 
cured the sum of $77,300, in cash and pledges, began the prepa- 



290 THE CONSOLIDATED CHURCHES. 

ration of plans under the supervision of the architect, Mr. 
Charles S. Frost. 

Six hundred people have contributed to this cause, 
in sums varying from one to ten thousand dollars. One 
hundred of the contributors are people living in the im- 
mediate vicinity of the First Church, who are in no way 
affiliated with the work, but have faith in the efforts the 
Society is making for the boys and girls of the community. 

The memorial windows and tablets, and the organ 
from the old edifice at Indiana avenue and Twenty-first 
street have been removed to the new home of the Church 
at Forty-first street. We hope in the early autumn to be 
installed in a modern building, thoroughly equipped — a 
worthy recognition of the union of two Congregations and 
the inauguration of a new work, in a new field, by the old 
First Church. 



WILLIAM CHALMERS COVERT. 291 

WILLIAM CHALMERS COVERT, 
NINTH MINISTER 

The most significant movement in Church circles of 
recent years has been the consolidation of the old First with 
the Forty-first Street Presbyterian Church. The final serv- 
ice (Christmas), held on Sunday morning-, December 29, 
1912, in the old edifice at Indiana avenue and Twenty-first 
street, was an event of historic interest. To some of the 
Congregation, the occasion seemed a funeral, its closing hymn, 
a dirge. Bitter tears were shed by old members, to whom 
the family pew, with forty years of tender associations, seemed 
like another home. 

Dr. Freeman, in his sermon, "A Glorious Inventory," 
discussed the work accomplished by the old First Church 
in its eighty years of life since Fort Dearborn days. Dr. 
Covert followed : 

"Tears are in order, but they must not prevent this 
Church from seeing the width of the new field into which 
God is leading her. There are before her opportunities as 
great as any in her long history. In meeting the crises of 
the past, this Church came to power, and the fame of her 
pulpit under John Henry Barrows spread throughout the 
world. The very difBculties in her way made William John 
Chichester and her other Ministers pentecostal messengers. 
Therefore, close up the ranks, and under the banner of this 
historic Church, move on, chanting hopefully, 'Onward, 
Christian Soldiers.' " 

William Chalmers Covert was born October 4, 1864, 
of Scotch-Irish and Holland-Dutch parents, in a Presby- 
terian community near Franklin, Indiana. In a country 
academy, not far from Franklin, founded by Col. Simon 
Covert, soldier of 1812, the young lad received his early 
education. He was graduated from Hanover College, Indiana, 
in 1885 and from the McCormick Theological Seminary in 
1888. Soon after graduation, he received from the Presby- 
tery of Indianapolis his first license to preach and was 
ordained to the Gospel ministry by the Presbytery of vSt. 
Paul, Minn. His first serious w^ork was the organization 



292 WILLIAM CHALMERS COVERT. 

of the St. Paul Park Presbyterian Church, as a Home 
Mission enterprise, of which he was Minister from 1888 to 
1891. While in this pastorate he was married, on May 14, 
1890, in the old stone church of Clinton, New York, to Alice 
Brown Hudson, daughter of the Rev. Thomas B. Hudson, D.D. 

His next ministry was with the Merriam Park Presby- 
terian Church of St. Paul. In 1898, he was chosen Modera- 
tor of the Synod of Minnesota. He served as Trustee of the 
Macalester Synodical College of Minnesota for five years; 
Trustee of the Albert Lea College for Women for seven 
years. All this time he was working on the editorial staff 
of the "Northwestern Presbyterian," published in Minne- 
apolis. 

In October, 1900, he was called to the First Presby- 
terian Church of Saginaw, Michigan, where he labored 
until the call came to him in March, 1905, from the Forty- 
first Street Presbyterian Church of Chicago. When the 
consolidation of the First and Forty-first Street Presby- 
terian Churches was effected, on December 30, 1912, Dr. 
Covert was chosen Minister of the new First Church and 
was installed January 24, 1913. 

In the midst of the active work of his parish, the 
Minister has found time to serve for ten years on the Board 
of Directors of the McCormick Seminary and, more recently, 
as Secretary of their Executive Committee and Special Lec- 
turer on Church History. The editorial staff of the "Con- 
tinent" demands much of his time, as does also the "Men at 
Work," the national magazine of the Presbyterian Brother- 
hood, of which he is editor. He is a member of the Clerical 
Board of the Presbyterian Hospital; member of the Board of 
Church Extension of the Chicago Presbytery ; and member of 
the General Assembly's Committee on religious education for 
the past five years. Dr. Covert was chosen a Commissioner to 
the General Assembly, now (1913) meeting at Atlanta, Georgia. 

During these busy years, Dr. Covert has found leisure 
for literary work and has given to the world some charm- 
ing stories, showing that, like Izaak Walton, his heart is 



WILLIAM CHALMERS COVERT. 293 

near to nature: "The Christmas Day Dream," "The Plumb 
Line," "The Parish Trail," "What Israel Ought to Do," and 
"With Verdure Clad." During the recent Lenten period, 
he delivered a series of addresses to the women of the 
parish, which were instructive and helpful : "The Venerable 
Bede," "Catherine of Siena," "Francis of Assissi," and 
"Savonarola." 

The Forty-first Street Presbyterian Church, under the 
ministry of Dr. Covert, has made distinct progress, equal 
to that of any church in the Chicago Presbytery, bringing 
a membership of nine hundred and fifty into the consolida- 
tion with the old First Church. From the very inception 
of the union of these two strong forces, it has been the 
Minister's thought that the Church building should be used 
for larger community work. "The boys and girls," said Dr. 
Covert, "should have consideration in their physical develop- 
ment as well as in their moral ; there should be a gymnasium, 
library and room for games, with ofifices for the various work- 
ers." The Building and Improvement Committee has met with 
such liberal responses from our own members and from gen- 
erous people in the neighborhood, that we can all look forward, 
in the early autumn, "to an amplified Church plant, with ac- 
commodations therein, which have been so long needed and 
yearned for by young and old." 



294 THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL. 

THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL 

Mr. E. G. Mason, in his "Chicago and Early Illinois" 
(1890), gives the address by Mr. Philo Carpenter to the 
First Church Sunday-school (1868), in which Mr. Carpenter 
told the children how he came to organize the school, with 
names of scholars and other particulars. Mr. Carpenter 
arrived in Chicago, July 18, 1832, and on Sunday morn- 
ing, August 19, a month later, with the assistance of 
Capt. Seth Johnson of the fort, and John Noble, "a 
Methodist brother," he gathered thirteen children of the 
settlement for a Sunday-school, in an unfinished building 
belonging to Mark Beaubien. Later, the services were held 
in "Father" Walker's cabin, until Jeremiah Porter came. May, 
1833, with the troops, when the children assembled in the 
fort. Mr. John Wright, the Librarian, carried to the school 
every Sunday, in a silk handkerchief, all the books constitut- 
ing the library. It soon became necessary to substitute a 
basket for the silk handkerchief, when Mr. Joseph Meeker 
arrived in 1833 bringing a quantity of second-hand books 
from a Sunday-school in New York City. At the first per- 
manent organization of the school, March 16, 1835, Aaron 
Russell was elected Superintendent; John Wright, Secretary, 
and Joseph Meeker, Librarian. 

Col. Charles Ailing, for many years our esteemed 
Superintendent, has added further data regarding the history 
of the school : 

"We have no record of other officers until 1845, when 
Elisha Clark became Superintendent. In 1849, the school 
moved with the Church to the new brick building at the 
southwest corner of Washington and Clark streets, where 
it had its own place of meeting separate from the main 
audience room of the Church. The new quarters were 
commodious, well lighted by day and with oil lamps at 
night. There were two good sized rooms, in addition to 
the main school and lecture room, in one of which the 
primary class was located and in the other the Bible class. 
The rooms were heated, as was also the auditorium above, 
with large iron stoves. From 1851 to 1857, the Superintend- 
ents were: Henry E. Seelye, Augustus G. Downs (called 



THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL. 295 

"The Sweet Singer in Israel") and Franklin V. Chamber- 
lain. Under the wise leadership of these beloved men the 
school prospered and was greatly blessed. On January 1, 
1857, there were 300 scholars in attendance, with the fol- 
lowing teachers: Messrs. A. G. Downs, Amzi Benedict, 
C. B. Nelson, B. W. Field, H. E. Seelye, L. Z. Leiter, John 
Bristol, Thos. S. Cooke, Wm. C. Lyman, Caleb Goodwin, 
Samuel T. Hinckley, James Hollingsworth, John McMonagle, 
Joseph Johnston, Henry Miller. A. B. ^^liller, Seth P. War- 
ner, T. C. Whitmarsh ; Mesdames A. G. Downs, F. V. Cham- 
berlain, Margarette Clarkson Hoard, Lucy Downs, Sarah 
Downs Moore, Harriet Wilbur, Antoinette Whitlock (after- 
ward Mrs. L. C. P. Freer), J. R. Shedd, R. H. Countiss, Enos 
Woods ; Misses Sarah Brookes, Margaret Brookes, Betsy 
Butler, Alary Clarke, Amanda S. Cooke, Mary Crary, Eunice 
Doggett, Catherine Fox, Annis Fox, and Alice Barnard. 

"After the removal of the Church (October, 1857), to 
the new edifice on Wabash avenue at Congress street, the 
school numbered 180 scholars with 25 teachers, divided into 
11 classes of girls, 10 of boys, and 4 large Bible classes. 
The decrease in attendance was due to the fact that the 
people were moving to the West and North Sides. In the 
new building the school room was in the east end, running 
the entire width of the Church over the main entrance and 
vestibule. The lecture and primary rooms were in the 
south tower and the Minister's study in the north tower; 
the room was long and narrow and well lighted from the 
east by a large window opening into the main audience room 
above the gallery. 

"On January 1, 1859, Franklin V. Chamberlain suc- 
ceeded Mr. Downs as Superintendent, but the latter re- 
mained in the school, teaching a class and leading the sing- 
ing as before. Mr. Chamberlain was succeeded by Oliver 
H. Lee as Superintendent in 1861. Edwin S. Skinner fol- 
lowed in 1862 and 1863, assisted by A. H. Gunn as Asso- 
ciate, and W. H. Hayden as Secretary, and John W. 
Burdsall, Librarian. Through the influence of John B. 
Gough, many of the scholars signed temperance pledge cards. 
Later, the cards were placed in a large frame behind glass 
and attached to the wall of the school room ; but all were 
destroyed in the great fire of 1871. 

"Joseph W. Smith was Superintendent from 186-4 to the 
close of 1867. On June 2, 1867. the new Chapel on Con- 
gress street, adjoining the Church, was dedicated. This 
building was very commodious and admirably adapted for 



296 THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL. 

Sunday School work, the Bible and primary rooms being 
separated from the main room by glass partitions whic^h 
could be raised and lowered. 

"Edward S. Wells was Superintendent in 1868, suc- 
ceeded by Henry W. Dudley, who served until 1871, with 
Archibald Gibson, Associate Superintendent, and William 
Tomlinson, Secretary and Librarian. With the resignation 
of Mr. Tomlinson, Thomas R. Jenkins was elected Secretary. 

"Among the teachers at this time were: Mesdames Geo. 
H. Laflin, Jesse Whitehead, S. F. Norcross, Andrew Brown, 
Abby Spencer Eddy, and James Leonard ; Mr. and Mrs. 
William H. Swift, Mr. and Mrs. Henry M. Sherwood, Mrs. 
Charles Wheeler, Mrs. Tappan Halsey, Mrs. Sexton, the Misses 
Andrews, Ella Cobb, and Sarah J. Squier; Col. Cuthbert W. 
Laing, and Messrs. George F. Bissell, George H. John- 
son, Charles Counselman, Henry M. Curtis, Nathan M. 
Wheeler, J. W. Smith, C. M. Hotchkin, and Philo A. Wilbor. 

"A ten-minute prayer service followed the close of 
school, a meeting which proved a blessing to officers, teach- 
ers and older scholars. Mr. Dudley was a staunch advocate 
of temperance. He urged the scholars to learn the Shorter 
Catechism and memorize passages of Scripture. 

"Henry M. Curtis, a worthy son of the third Minister 
of the Church, was Superintendent from 1871 to 1876. 
After the fire of October, 1871, the school met in the Im- 
manuel Baptist Church on Michigan avenue at 23rd street, 
while the Church proper held its services in Christ Reformed 
Episcopal Church, on Michigan avenue at 24th street. The 
school continued in this temporary home until April, 1872, 
when it moved to the new home of the First Church at 
Indiana avenue and Twenty-first street, where it grew in 
numbers and interest. Every Saturday evening the teach- 
ers met to study the lesson for the following Sunday and 
plan for the growth of the school. 

"George W. Darrow was Superintendent from 1876 
to 1879, and William H. Swift, from January 1, 1879 to 
January 1, 1881. Henry D. Penfield served during 1881. 
Mr. Swift returned again to the office (1882-1883). During 
the superintendency of Edwin C. Crawford (1884) the 
school session was changed from the afternoon to the noon 
hour. 

"Henry W. Dudley was again chosen Superintendent, 
serving from January 1, 1885, to January 1, 1892, when he 
was presented by the school with a gold watch in recogni- 
tion of his faithful service, which covered ten years. 




CHiiKGE \V. DARRoW 



THE SUN DA Y-SCHOOL. 297 

"The following served as officers and teachers (1871- 
1892) : Mesdames H. D. Penfield, Robert Fair, Dwight W. 
Jackson, John Ailing, Henry M. Curtis, George H. Laflin, 
Grace Laflin Whitehead, John Angus, Charles L. Bing- 
ham, Samuel Faulkner, Hamilton Borden, Nellie F. Car- 
penter, Charles S. Frost, Daniel A. Jones, J. R. Hoagland, 
W. A. Magie, C. H. Wheeler, Samuel Baker, W. H. Swift, 
Charles D. Hamill, B. B. Botsford, Edwin F. Getchell, A. 
W. Green, Robert M. Wells, Joseph E. Otis, John E. 
Jenkins, Charles T. Atkinson, S. F. Norcross, J. H. Brown, 
Henry M. Humphrey, John Henry Barrows; Misses Mary 
Wells, Lulu Faulkner, Hattie Faulkner, Frances H. Hop- 
son, Jessica Jenks, Mrs. Delia Otis Deming; Messrs. Wm. 
C. Grant, W. H. Swift, Philo A. Wilbor, H. D. Penfield, 
H. M. Curtis, H. M. Bacon, James Todd, Charles Ailing, 
Charles S. Frost, Dr. Etheridge, Garrett Newkirk, Marvin 
Hughitt, G. F. Bissell, Ebenezer Buckingham, James Otis, 
O. D. Ranney, H. H. Munger, Clifford Williams, C. W. 
Lilly, O. P. Curran, J. A. Bissell, Charles L. Bingham, 
F. T. Haskell, Alexander Murison, and Harry B. Wheeler; 
Mr. Henry M. Bacon was most efficient in supervising study 
courses for which diplomas were given. The leaders of the 
music at different periods have been: Messrs. R. S. Thaine, 
Francis S. Moore, and Adam Craig, with George W. Muri- 
son at the organ and Charles L. Bingham at the piano. 

'•Charles Ailing was Superintendent for thirteen of the 
twenty-one years between January 1, 1893, and December 
31, 1912; the longest superintendency in the history of the 
school. It was not a continuous service, for the reason that 
Mr. Alling's duties as member of the City Council inter- 
fered with his regular supervision of the school. During 
his term of office, teachers and scholars joined in present- 
ing him with a mahogany writing desk. George C. Purdy 
assumed the office from April, 1897, until October 9, 1898, 
being succeeded by Tracy C. Drake, who was the Super- 
intendent until January 7, 1900. When Mr. Dudley was 
Superintendent, Mr. Drake acted both as Secretary and 
Treasurer, performing his duties with faithfulness and effi- 
ciency. Mr. Drake and :\Ir. Todd took charge of the supper 
given at Christmas time of this year to the poor children. 

"George S. Matheson was Superintendent (1900-1903). 
He was succeeded by A. Stuart Baldwin until October, 
1903, followed by Mr. Ailing, who served until July, 1906. 
Henry C. Davis was then elected, holding the office until 
January 1, 1908. His superintendency was notable for the 



298 THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL. 

volunteer orchestra, which he organized. Mr. Davis intro- 
duced the custom of having the older scholars take part in 
the opening exercises. Mr. Ailing resumed his work Janu- 
ary 1, 1908, and continued in office until the school was 
merged with the Forty-first Street Church. Among the 
features of his administration were ten-minute papers read 
in the opening exercises on the subject, 'Centuries of Chris- 
tian History.' Mr. Ailing started the plan of celebrating 
one Sunday in October of each year as 'Christian Citizen- 
ship Sunday,' which led to the adoption, by 'The Interna- 
tional Sunday School Convention' of similar exercises for 
all the schools of North America. The speaker in October, 
1901, was Judge Orrin N. Carter of the Supreme Court of 
Illinois. On this occasion, the 'Christian Conquest Flag' 
was introduced, designed by the Rev. S. M. Johnson in the 
moments of silence observed throughout the nation during 
President McKinley's funeral. Other speakers on citizen- 
ship occasions were : Judges R. S. Tuthill, C. S. Cutting, C. 
G. Neely, F. L. Fake, J. R. Newcomer, McKenzie Cleland, 
and Judson F. Going; also Francis W. Parker, Jane Addams, 
Charles L. Hutchinson and John L. Whitman. 

"During the superintendency of Mr. Dudley, who was 
a member of Taylor's Battery in the Civil War, an Ameri- 
can flag was purchased. This flag, with the Conquest 
Flag, was carried to the platform every Sunday. 

"For twenty-five years the school has given annually 
$300 to the support of a Child's Free Bed in the Presby- 
terian Hospital (a record surpassing all other schools in 
this Presbytery), in addition to $300 raised annually for 
other benevolences. 

"The school has been supported by an annual collec- 
tion taken in the Church through the efforts of the Young 
People's Mission Association (Mr. Charles T. Otis, Treas- 
urer), by which collection $600 to $800 was secured. 

"During Mr. Alling's term of office, a stereopticon was 
purchased for the use of the school, which Prof. McCalla 
has employed most effectively at the various lectures and 
evening entertainments given during the winter months. 
Mr. Ailing was also instrumental in providing a pamphlet 
containing the words of 200 good hymns, with separate 
books of music for the use of the orchestra. The Christmas, 
Easter, Rally, Hospital, and Citizenship services have always 
been well attended by members of the Congregation. On 
Children's Day, the scholars and officers of Railroad Mis- 
sion joined with the home school for the morning service 



THE SUN DA Y-SCHOOL. 299 

in the main auditorium. The Christmas suppers of the 
school in the last seven years were particularly joyous 
occasions. 

"In December, 1908 (Diamond Jubilee), the Sunday 
School room was crowded with members from the Congre- 
gation and friends, who came to attend these important ex- 
ercises. Several former Superintendents were present. The 
history of the school from its organization in 1832 until 
January, 1892, was read by Henry M. Curtis. Mrs. Martha 
Wells Atkinson read an interesting paper on the period in the 
school's history between 1892 and the Jubilee (1908). The 
present article has been prepared from the manuscripts read on 
this occasion. 

"From 1892 the Assistant Superintendents were: 
Charles L. Bingham, Clarence A. Fiske, Louis M. Grant, 
Ralph T. Hoagland, Francis M. Case, Robert A. Scovel, 
Paul H. Clark. Frank B. Bradley, Walter F. Brown, Van 
W. Ailing, John Angus, Hugh W. Croxton, William Sum- 
ner Smith, George D. Negley, H. Stuart Dudley, John 
Sears, Lawrence D. Rockwell, Alfred Vernon, and Arthur 
C. DePoy. 

"Between 1891 and 1900 the position of Secretary- 
Treasurer was filled successively by: Frank B. Bradley, 
Louis C. Penfield, Francis M. Case, John L. Jones, John 
B. Drake, Jr., Laurence H. and Raymond C. Dudley, and 
Walter F. Brown. The offices were then separated and the 
following served as Secretary: R. P. Thompson, Hugh W. 
Croxton, William ]\L Wilson, Bradford Wells, George D. 
Neglev, H. Stuart Dudley, Albert J. Little, Miss Hortense 
Carborg, Allen Stites, and Duncan Mclntyre. Arthur W. 
Brintnall was Treasurer from January 7, 1900. until October 
7, 1903, and Clarence R. Manzer until January 1, 1913. 

"Since 1891 the Librarians have been : James E. Slocum, 
Francis M. Case. Daniel U. Chamberlain, Harold Gris- 
wold. Wirt A. and Miss Genevieve Stevens, H. W. Thomp- 
son, Livingston Glover, Paul McCalla, Miner T. Ames, 
Tames Boyce. George Jamieson. and Harry J. Magee. Prof. 
McCalla classified the books in the Library and made a 
catalogue. One of the teachers gave some new books with 
cases, and also furnished book plates from a design engraved 
by the late Mr. Spenceley. The same teacher furnished 
oak tables for the use of each class. 

"Mrs. Joseph E. Otis gave, as a memorial, the piano 
which her daughter, Pauline, had used in her lifetime. _ 

"George W. Murison served as pianist for a period of 
twenty years and more. During this time he met Miss 



300 THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL. 

Myrta Whitehill, who was organist for the school, and to 
whom he is now married. Charles L. Bingham assisted 
at the organ; Jesse Whitehead at the piano, alternating at 
the organ, from 1904 to 1908. 

Mrs. Florence Lindgren Davis has also served as 
pianist. Miss Genevieve Stevens, Messrs. Charles Matteson 
and Norman Betts have kindly given us their services as 
violinists. 

"Adam Craig was precentor until September, 1907, 
covering a period of over twenty years. Mrs. Margaret 
Richardson La Monte and August Rundquist served later as 
precentors. We have also had the effective services of 
John Quinn (cornet), Mrs. Olga E. Trumbull ('cello), Fred. 
Waterman (violin), and Miss Gertrude Haynes (piano). 

"Among the teachers of Bible classes have been Dr. 
and Mrs. John Henry Barrows, Col. James M. Emery (who 
has been Superintendent of Railroad Mission for fourteen 
years), Prof. Albert McCalla, Henry D. Penfield, Miss Mary 
E. Wells, Miss Minnie Stevens, Mrs. Charles E. Baker, Mrs. 
Albert L. Berry, and Mr. James W. Janney. 

"Among the teachers of other classes have been, since 
1892, Miss Mary E. Wells (undoubtedly of longest service), 
Mrs. Robert M. Wells, Mrs. Mildred Wells Carton, Mrs. 
Martha Wells Atkinson, Mrs. Nathalie Wells Lowe, Mrs. 
Frances Wells Shaw, Mrs. Belle Hughitt Granger, Miss 
Alice M. Fair, Miss Isabel W. Dudley, Miss Helen V. 
Drake, Mrs. Tracy C. Drake, Mrs. Walter Frazer Brown, 
Mrs. John Angus, Mrs. Irma Lucas Angus, Mrs. Jennie 
Fyfe Roberts, Mrs. William M. Wilson, Miss Jeanette 
Negley, Mrs. Margaret Burton, Mrs. William Hill, Mrs. 
Nellie F. Carpenter, Mrs. Flora Carpenter Lourie, Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry M. Curtis, Mrs. Maude Griswold Swender, and 
Miss Grace Griswold,' Mrs. Grace Otis Sage, Mrs. Mary 
Whitehead Miller, Mrs. Madeline Whitehead Rockwell, Miss 
Elizabeth C. Ailing, Mrs. Van Wagenen Ailing, Miss Helen 
Boyce, Mrs. M. L. Brintnall, Mrs. Sadie DeYoung Brint- 
nall, Mrs. Susanne Faulkner Reid, Mrs. Ruth Chamberlain 
Keogh, Mrs. Alice Baxter Jones, Mrs. Katherine Shedd 
Bradley, Mrs. William A. Magie, and Misses Mildred and 
Lolita Magie, Mrs. Emily Faithful Ames Bramwell, Mrs. 
Anita Wilkens Vaughan, Miss Mildred Janney, Miss Bessie 
Scott, Mr. and Mrs. John M. Scott, Miss Grace Chamber- 
lain, Mrs. Daniel A. Jones, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Zeh, Miss 
Alice E. Fox. Mrs. Dwight W. Jackson and daughters, 
Miss Helen W. McCalla, Mrs. Frances Borden Purdy, Mrs. 



THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL. 301 

Opal McCreary Rundquist, Miss Elsie Wilhelms, Miss Sara 
E. Burlingame, Mrs. Bertha Moeser Foote, Miss Edith 
Walton, Miss Angie Williams, Miss Leila C. Brown, Miss 
Agnes Thompson, Mrs. Virginia Brooks Washburne, Miss 
Irene Everett and Messrs. H. H. Munger, J. W. Ferine, 
Graham C. Wells, J. Gemmill Chichester, John M. Biegler, 
and John O. Hamilton. 



302 THE PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

THE PRIMARY DEPARTMENT 

"When the First Church took possession (1849) of its 
new edifice at the corner of Washington and Clark streets, 
known as the 'Brick Church/ the Primary Department, for 
the first time, had a room of its own, and ever since it 
has been richly blessed with teachers. For nineteen years, 
thereafter, Miss Alice Barnard, a woman greatly beloved in 
the Church, was head of this department. She died in 1908 
after forty years of work in the public school service of 
this city. Miss Barnard was succeeded in 1871 by Mrs. 
John Ailing, who brought to her work a brilliant mind and 
a loving, consecrated heart. Mrs. Ailing was succeeded by 
Mrs. Alexander P. Moore, who devotedly conducted the de- 
partment from 1881 to 190-4. During one year of this period, 
the lessons were taught by Mrs. Samuel Faulkner, and 
during another year by Mrs. John C, Williams. Mrs. 
Moore was assisted, after the spring months of 1888, by 
Mrs. Charles A. Burr, who, in 1904, became head of the 
department. On April 13, 1913, a gray enamel watch with 
a platinum chain was given to Mrs. Burr, in commemora- 
tion of her twenty-five years as teacher in the school. 
A china plate was given to Miss Jessica Jenks in recogni- 
tion of her twenty years' faithful service in leading the 
singing in the Primary Department. Miss Marguerite Grant 
was a teacher in this department, and among the pianists 
at various times, were Mrs. E. P. Whitehead, Mrs. Mary 
Thompson Vernon, and Mrs. Alice Baxter Jones. 

"In September, 1902, when new windows were placed 
in the Church, seven donated by Mrs. John B. Drake were 
beautifully embellished and placed in the Primary Depart- 
ment. At the same time, she gave a tall clock and other 
attractive furniture for the Primary room. In 1907, Mrs. 
Drake installed a handsome mantelpiece with imported 
tiles and gas log, gas fixtures, 'hardwood floor border, wall 
paper, carpets, pictures, and ornaments, and redecorated 
the halls leading to the Primary room. Mrs. Drake and 
her daughter. Miss Helen V., had previously given the picture 
of 'Christ in the Temple' for the Sunday School room, in 
memory of John Manning Barrows, who died at the age 
of twelve years. And for several years they provided for 
the Yule-tide celebrations of the school a beautifully trim- 
med Christmas tree lighted by electricity. As a slight 
recognition of her liberal gifts, Mrs. Drake was made 
Honorary Superintendent of the Primary Department and 



THE PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 303 

was called affectionately and gratefully its 'Fairy God- 
mother.' A most affecting- memorial service was held in 
that room on the second Sunday after her death, which 
occurred on October 25, 1911. 

"Miss Helen V. Drake succeeded her mother as 
Honorary Superintendent, and when the Congregation de- 
cided to remove to Forty-first street, she requested the privilege 
of continuing the Primary Department with Mrs. Burr as 
teacher, in its artistic room at Twenty-first street. The Trustees 
gladly granted this privilege and a goodly number of little 
ones gathered in their beautiful Church-home during the 
first half of 1913, after all other services had been dis- 
continued in the hallowed old structure. 

OFFICERS— 1913. 

Superintendent Colonel Charles Ailing 

Associate Superintendents 

Alfred Vernon, Arthur C. DePoy, William Sumner Smith 

Secretary Duncan Mclntyre 

Treasurer Clarence R. Manzer 

Librarian Harry J. Magee 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 

Honorary Superintendent Miss Helen V. Drake 

Superintendent Mrs. C. A. Burr 

Associate Superintendent Miss Jessica Jenks 

OFFICERS— 1913. 

Superintendent Walter R. Mee 

Associate Superintendent L. M. Paine 

Secretary Charles H. Spencer, Jr. 

Treasurer William Sumner Smith 

Librarian Harry J. Magee 

PRIMARY DEPARTMENT. 
Superintendent Mrs. L. J. Lamson 

INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT. 
Superintendent Miss Katherine Calloway 



304 THE RAILROAD MISSION. 



THE RAILROAD MISSION 

"The Railroad Misson Sunday-school was founded by 
the Rev. Brainerd Kent, May 10, 1857, in two passenger 
cars of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern R. R., stand- 
ing on the tracks near Van Buren street. The school was 
then called the 'Railroad Sunday School.' When it moved 
out of the cars into an empty store, nearby, it was called 
the 'Railroad Mission.' Later, when the school had a brick 
building as a home of its own, it was named 'Railroad 
Chapel.' 

"The first Chapel building stood on a lot given by the 
Railroad Company, on Griswold street, south of Van Buren, 
near the present La Salle Station, and was dedicated July 
4, 1858. This building accommodated about 300 scholars 
and teachers and was soon uncomfortably crowded at every 
service. A second building, erected on Griswold street, 
seating at least 1,000 and costing $21,000, was dedicated 
March 27, 1864, and used until the great fire (October, 
1871), when it, and all of its furniture, was destroyed. For 
a year and a half after the fire, the Railroad Chapel Con- 
gregation and Sabbath-school met in the Jewish Synagogue 
at the corner of Wabash avenue and Peck court. 

"In the meantime, the First Presbyterian Church had 
purchased a lot on State street, south of Fourteenth, at a 
cost of $24,000, on which the Society erected a large brick 
building, which, with its furniture and organ, cost $46,000 
additional. The Rev. Donald Fletcher was the first Min- 
ister in this building, continuing in this work for a year or 
more afterward. Then the Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D., Min- 
ister of the First Church, preached in the Chapel on Sun- 
day evenings for three years. On October 1, 1880, the 
Rev. Charles M. Morton was called to the pastorate of the 
Chapel and continued in the w^ork for fourteen years. 

"In 1891, the Chapel was transferred to a new location 
at 3825 Dearborn street. In consequence of the changing 
conditions in the vicinity of this building, the First Church, 
on February 26, 1900, authorized the sale of this property, 
the purchasers agreeing that the school should have use of 
the main auditorium for its Sunday afternoon services. The 
school remained at 3825 Dearborn street until June, 1907, 
when another move was made to the old Peacock home at 
619 Thirty-seventh street. The Trustees had secured a 
favorable lease of this property and here for seven years 
the school has found a pleasant and commodious home. 




CHARLES M M' >K'r( i\ 



THE RAILROAD MISSION. 305 

The change to Thirty-seventh street was made at the sug- 
gestion of Dr. Morison. On June 2, 1907, at 2:45 P. M., 
the Railroad Mission Sunday-school, with the allied clubs 
and societies, made their exodus from the old building, 
3825 Dearborn street, to the new home on Thirty-seventh 
street. 

"The Superintendents of the Mission, from its organi- 
zation in 1857, have been: S. P. Farrington, George W. Per- 
kins, J. K. Stearns, C. M. Henderson, N. D. Pratt, Charles S. 
Lee, James M. Storie, and Colonel James M. Emery (since De- 
cember 25, 1898)." 

I was organist (1869) at the Chapel on Griswold street 
when Mr. Perkins was Superintendent, and later (1870) 
with Mr. J. K. Stearns. After the completion of the build- 
ing on State at Fourteenth street, I played at the evening 
services from 1875 until the change was made to 3825 Dear- 
born street, when, in 1896, my work ended. Every Sunday 
night, summer and winter, when in the city, either Mr. 
Charles D. Irwin or myself, was in attendance at the Chapel. 
I am indebted to Colonel Emery and Mr. Josiah W. Perine 
for the facts collected by them for the paper entitled "A 
Brief History of Railroad Mission," read May 10, 1907, at 
the Fiftieth Anniversary of the School. 

OFFICERS— 1913. 

Minister The Rev. Glenn L. Rice 

Superintendent Colonel James M. Emery 

Assistant Superintendents — The Rev. Albert McCalla, Lloyd 
E. Smullen, Jens Smith and J. A. Rundquist. 

Secretary William R. Glen 

Treasurer J. F. Kappelman 

Pianist Margaret M. Rundquist 

Chorister Amos W. Cole 

Librarian Carrie Loyce 



306 POSTLUDE. 

POSTLUDE 

The history of the First Presbyterian Church of Chi- 
cago, as given in these pages, treats chiefly of the growth 
of the Society and of matters of immediate interest pertaining 
to the "Pulpit and Choir," the Sunday School and Railroad 
Mission, without touching on other departments, such as 
the various missionary and benevolent organizations sus- 
tained by the Church — a field which has been of great im- 
port in its life, but for which exhaustive resources are not 
at hand. A complete list of officers and members from Fort 
Dearborn days to the present time would be a valuable ad- 
dition to this work; lack of space, only, prevents me from 
giving such a list. 

Aside from giving some information regarding persons 
and events comparatively little known, I have confined my- 
self to an outline of the progress in the musical part of Divine 
worship, since the time when our fathers and mothers sang 
in the Choir. 

If, in presenting the growth of this venerable Society, 
"The Church on the Frontier," "whose life and influence," 
as Dr. Barrows says, "has run parallel with the strenuous 
and widely expanding life of a city which has in a genera- 
tion and a half become one of the chief commercial centers 
of the world," I have added any facts which will be held 
dear by the present generation, and which would otherwise 
have faded into oblivion, I shall feel that my task has not 
been entirely in vain. 




COLOXHI, .lAMHS M HMKRV 




RAILROAD MISSION 
No. 309 West Thirty SL-vinth Street. 



ADDENDA 

The Second Presbyterian Church of Chicago was organ- 
ized under the general law of 1835, on the first day of June, 
1842, by the following named persons, all of whom were re- 
ceived by letter from the First Presbyterian Church: 



Brown, William H. 
Brown, Mrs. Harriet C. 
Carter, Thomas B. 
Carter, Mrs. Catherine R. 
Dole, George W. 
Fullerton, Mrs. A. N. 
Gage, Mrs. Sarah. 
High, John. 
High, Mrs. Elizabeth. 
Hooker, John W. 
Hooker, Mrs. John W. 
Johnson, Seth. 
Johnson, Mrs. Seth. 



Merrill, George. 
MosELY, Flavel. 
Raymond, Benjamin W. 
Raymond, Mrs. Amelia. 
Starkweather, Charles R. 



Starkweather, Mrs. M. 
WiLLARD, Sylvester. 
Williams, John C. 
Williams, Mrs. John C. 
Webster, Mrs. Ann E. 
Wright, Miss Frances S 
Wright, John S. 
Wright, Mrs. John S. 



E. 



("History of the Second Presbyterian Church," Chicago, 
1892.) 



The Rev. Herrick Johnson, D. D., was born September 22, 1832, 
in Kaughnevvaga, N. Y. ; came to Chicago in 1880 as Minister of the 
Fourth Presbyterian Church, at the same time teaching at the McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary. In 1883 he gave up his pastorate to 
accept a full professorship in the Seminary, which he held until 1905, 
when he retired from all active work. Dr. Johnson died November 
20, 1913, at his home in Philadelphia. 



307 



308 ADDENDA 

OFFICERS 

1856 
Minister— The Rev. Harvey Curtis, D. D. 

SESSION 

James Hollingsworth. Orrin Kendall. 

Frankun V. Chamberlain. C, B. Nelson. 

Edwin S. Wells. Henry E. Seelye. 

superintendent of SUNDAY-SCHOOL 

A. G. Downs. 

trustees 
C. N. Henderson. C. B. Nelson. 

A. G. Downs. Amzi Benedict. 

S. P. Farrington. 

1860 
Minister — The Rev. Z. M. Humphrey, D. D. 

session 

Franklin V. Chamberlain. Henry E. Seelye. 

Orrin Kendall. J. W. Smith. 

C. B. Nelson. Edwin S. Wells. 

trustees 
Amzi Benedict. George H. Hazelton. 

H. C. DuRAND. C. B. Nelson. 

Solomon A. Smith. 

1867 
Minister — The Rev. Z. M. Humphrey, D. D. 
session 
Claudius B. Nelson. Henry E. Seelye. 

Orrin Kendall. S. P. Farrington. 

J. W. Smith. E. S. Skinner. 

E. S. Wells, Clerk of Session. 

trustees 
W. T. Allen. George P. Whitman. 

George H. Laflin. George W. Ordway. 

J. H. Walker. 



The names of the officers on pages SOS and 309 are taken from 
old manuals of the Church in my possession. I regret there is not 
space for making a complete list of all the men who have faithfully 
served the Church from its foundation in 1833. 



ADDENDy\ 

OFFICERS 

1872 
Minister — The Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D. 

SESSION 



309 



Henry E. Seelye. 
Thomas Lord. 
J. W. Smith. 
James Otis. 



Henry Wood. 
H. D. Penfield. 
O. D. Ranney. 
George F. Bissell. 
H. G. Miller. 



Henry C. Durand. 



DEACONS 

Henry W. Dudley, 
David W. Irwin. 



TRUSTEES 

George K. Clark, President. 
Henry M. Curtis. J. P. Brooks. 

David W. Irwin. Frank C. Wells. 



1873 
Minister— The Rev. Arthur Mitchell, D. D. 



session 



J. W. Smith. 

Dr. R. C. Hamill. 

James Otis. 

Samuel P. Farrington. 

Thomas Lord. 



James Hollingsworth. 
O. D. Ranney. 
George F. Bissell. 
Henry Wood. 
H. D. Penfield. 



Henry C. Durand. 
Henry W. Dudley. 
David W. Irwin. 



Henry C. Durand. 
Dr. Henry Hitchcock. 



deacons 



trustees 



Samuel Faulkner. 
M. B. EwiNG. 
O. P. Curr.\n. 



J. P. Brooks. 
Addison Ballard 



David W. Irwin. 



GENERAL INDEX 



Adams, Rev. J. \V., U. D., 25. 
Adams, Deacon Philo, 19, S4. 
Allen, \V. T., 41. 
Allen, Rev. Dr. (Freedman's Board), 

78. 
Ailing, Col. Charles, Jr., 166, 195, 

256, 285, 294, 297, 298. 
Ailing, John, 45, 75. 
Ames, James C, 286. 
Anderson, Rev. Edward, 14; accepts 

call to Calvary Church, 48; 98. 
Apollo Musical Club, 65, 69, 205, 223, 



224, 



2oo, 2ob. 



Aries, France, 148. 

Atkinson, Mrs. Charles T., 144, 166, 
182, 296, 299, 300. 

Atterbury, Rev. J. G., 39. 

Aull, Rev. Wilson, 182. 

Bacon, Rev. L. W., D. D., 92. 

Bacon, George F., 45, 53; death, 61. 

Bacon, H. M., 61, 166. 

Backus, Rev. T- T., 249. 

Baker, Miss Elizabeth, 158. 

Baker, Samuel, 132, 267. 

Baker, W. M., 45, 196. 

Ballard, Addison, 19; funeral, 141; 
249, 250. 

Barber, Jabez, 30, 31. 

Barker, Joseph N., 55. 

Barnes, Rev. CHftord W., 127, 262. 

Barrows, Rev. John H., D. D., 13, 
14; call extended from First 
Church and first service, 71; in- 
stallation, 72; reception to Dr. and 
Mrs. Barrows, 81; resignation, 99; 
farewell tribute to, 100; farewell 
reception and last service, 100; 
105, 106, 120; death and memorial 
service, 124; life, 253; funeral at 
OberHn, Ohio, 258, 259; 282, 284, 
291, 300. 

Barrows, Rev. J. M. and Mrs. Bar- 
rows, 253. 

Barrows, John Manning, death, 92; 

302. 
Barrows, Miss Mary E., 124, 253. 
Barrows, Rev. Walter M., D. D., 

death, 77. 
Bartlett, A. C, 75. 
Bartlett, F. C, 126. 
Bartlett, Rev. W. A., D. D., 79. 
Bascom, Rev. Flavel D. D., 27; in- 
stallation, 28; resignation, 32, 68, 
210; Ufe, 237. 
Bascom, Mrs., 239. 
Berry, A. L., 189, 285. 



Beaubien, Mark, 22, 28, 294. 

Beecher, Rev. H. W., 76, 254. 

Benedict, Amzi, 31, 36, 295. 

Beggs, Rev. S. R., 22. 

Biarritz, France, 148. 

Bissell, Geo. F., 55, 75; funeral, 97; 

279, 296, 297. 
Blackhawk, 19. 
Black, Rev. Hugh, 156. 
Blackburn, Rev. W. M., D. D., 67. 
Blatchford, E. W., 14, 149, 232, 236. 
Blatchford, Rev. John, D. D., 14, 
15, 27; installation and resigna- 
tion, 28; memorial tablet, 149; Hfe, 
232. 
Blatchford, Paul, 149. 
Bogner, W. F. (sexton), 277. 
BoUes, Peter, 26. 
Borden, Hamilton, 260. 
Booth, E. M. (Calvary Church 

Choir), 58. 
Bostwick, Chas. O., 14. 
Bostford, Henry, funeral, 107. 
Bowen, Frank A. (Calvary Church 

Choir), 59. 
Boyce, S. Leonard, 143, 196, 200, 

270, 285, 289. 
Boyer, Rev. C. E., 188. 
Boyington, W. W., 36. 
Breed, Rev. Dr., 79. 
Bradlev, Addison B. (wedding), 196. 
Brick 'Presbyterian Church, New 

York City, 197. 
Bristol, Rev. Frank, 76, 100. 
Bristol, R. C, 30, 31. 
Brooks, Rev. Jesse W., 180. 
Brooks, J. P., 41. 
Brown, J. H., 37. 
Brown, John H. (Elder), funeral, 

143. 
Brown, Rufus, boarding house, 28. 
Brown, Wm. H., 26. 
Brown, John (Ossawatomie), 244. 
Brown, Miss Leila C, 286, 301. 
Buckingham, Mr. and Mrs. H. W., 

120, 123. 
Buckingham, Mrs. Florence O., fu- 
neral, 187. 
Burchard, Rev. Dr., 39. 
Burnham, Rev., 70. 
Burtis, Sergt. Richard, 209. 
Burr, Mrs. Charles, 286, 302, 303. 
Bushnell, Rev. John E., 135. 
Butterfield, J. A., 61. 
Butler, Prof. Nathaniel, 130, 163, 
180. 



311 



312 



INDEX 



Buckingham, Otis, 120. 
Cain, Rev. Louis P., D. D., 172. 
Calvary Presbyterian Church, 7; or- 
ganization, 43; early members, 44, 
45, 46; choir, 57, 58, 59; first 
Board of Trustees, 46; first edi- 
fice, 47; edifice at Twenty-second 
Street, 49; edifice at Twenty-first 
Street, 52, 53; consolidation with 
First Church, 55, 56, 60, 196. 
Calumet Club, 233. 
Calvin Quarto Centenary, 171. 
Carpenter, Philo, 22, 28, 294. 
Carrier, Rev. A. S., 134, 135. 
Carson, Rev. F. M., 130. 
Central Music Hall Services com- 
menced; committee of mainte- 
nance, 75. 
Chambers, Mr. and Mrs. B. B., 44. 
Chamberlain, Franklin V., 40; fu- 
neral, 114; 295. 
Chappel, Miss Eliza, marriage to Dr. 

Porter, 23. 
Cheney, Rt. Rev. C. E., D. D., 76, 

100, 177. 
Chicago, incorporated, 229. 
Chicago Orphan Asylum, 43, 44, 133, 

155. 
Chichester, Rev. W. J., D. D., 13; 
call extended, first service, in- 
stallation, 105; death and memo- 
rial service, 127; hfe, 260; 283, 291. 
Chilson, Miss Lulu, 158. 
Christ Reformed Episcopal Church, 

60, 85, 94, 177. 
Clark, Wallace G., 187. 
Clark, Rev. W. W., 14. 
Cochrane, J. C, architect of Calvary 

Church, 53, 249. 
Cook, Rev. Joseph, D. D., 67, 92. 
Corwith, Henry, 75. 
Cordova, Spain, 148. 
Corwith, Nathan, 75; funeral, 86, 

182. 
Counselman, Chas., 132, 296. ^ 
Covert, Rev. W. C, D. D., 167, 181, 

202, 285, 289; Hfe, 291. 
Cowles, Alfred, 75. 
Craig, Rev. W. G., D. D., 106, 128. 
Craig, Adam, 87, 167; death, 187; 

297, 300. 
Curtis, Rev. E. H., D. D., 70, 116, 

167. 
Curtis, Rev. Harvey, D. D., 15, 22; 
installation, 33; resignation, 37; 
hfe, 240; 245. 
Curtis, H. M., 39, 106, 242, 286, 296, 
297. 



Curtis, Mrs. H. M., 189. 
Curtiss, Rev. Samuel I., 103. 
Cuyler, Rev. Theo. L., D. D., 38, 39, 

91, 142. 
Dana, Rev. Dr., 81. 
Darrow, George W., funeral, 105 

296. 
Darrow, Mrs. George W., funeral. 

105. 
Dearborn, Gen. H., 18. 
Devine, Rev. S. L., 156. 
Deming, Mrs. H. H., 46, 131. 
Dickey, Rev. Dr., 156. 
Dickinson, Rev. W. C, 51. 
Dickinson, Clarence, 51, 197. 
Derby, W. M., 285, 286. 
Douglas, Stephen A., 163. 
Downs, A. G., 31, 36; funeral, 68, 

295. 
Downs, Mrs. A. G., funeral, 81. 
Drake, John B., 69, 75; funeral, 99; 

188. 
Drake, Mrs. John B., funeral, 188; 

302. 
Drake, Miss Helen V., 188, 200, 286, 

300, 302, 303. 
Drake, Tracy C, lectures, 110, 161; 

188, 297. 
Dudley, Henry W., 133, 200, 230, 

260, 285, 296, 297. 
Durand, Charles E., 45. 
Durand, Calvin, 45. 
Durand, H. C, 45. 
Dyson, John R. (sexton), death 98. 
Ebell, Prof., 57. 
Eddy, Mrs. Sarah H., 96. 
Eddy, Mrs. A. N., 168. 
Eells, Rev. James, D. D., 67, 249. 
Elgin Band, 86. 

Emery, Col. J. M., 195, 300, 305. 
Fergus, George H., 14. 
Farrington, S. P., 31, 36, 40, 305. 
Field, Rev. A. D., 24. 
Field, Marshall, 69, 75; funeral, 144; 

145, 253. 
First Baptist Church, organization, 

23; 27, 60, 66, 76. 
Fisher, Mrs. Flora, 99. 
Fisk, Prof. F. W., 70, 71, 80, 104; 

funeral, 121. 
First Regiment, I. N. G., 86, 165, 166. 
First M. E. Church, organization, 22. 
Fiske, Rev. Samuel A., 130. 
Fletcher, Rev. Donald, first Minis- 
ter R. R. Mission, 304. 
Florence, Italy, service in Church of 

Annunziata, 134. 
Fort Brady, 20. 



INDEX 



313 



Fort Dearborn, 17, IS, 20, 22, 229. 
Fort Dearborn Guild, organization, 

138; 143, 144, 147, 158, 166, 177. 
Fourth Presbyterian Church, 36, 134, 

172. 
Fowle, Major John, 20, 229. 
Freeman, Rev. A. B., 25, 27. 
Frost, Charles S., 290, 297. 
Freeman, Rev. John N., D. D., 172, 

180; Minister in Charge, 181; last 

service, 202; 271; hfe, 272; 291. 
Free, Mrs. WiUiam C, 184. 
Freer, L. C. P., funeral, 89; 116. 
Freer, Mrs. L. C. P., 116, 210, 295. 
Frothingham, Rev. James, D. D., 

167, 180. 
Ganfield, Prof. W. A., 173, 180. 
Gibson, Rev. J. M., D. D., 265. 
Gleason, Frederic G., 71, 217. 
Grace Episcopal Church, 53, 54. 
Grant, WiUiam C, funeral, 83, 297. 
Graves, Major E. P., 43. 
Graves, Rev. F. W., 43, 40. 
Graves, Col. Rufus, 46. 
Greenebaum, Henry, 223. 
Grey, Mrs. W. L., 148. 
Gunsaulus, Rev. F. W., 95, 127, 181. 
Hale, Rev. Albert, 28. 
Hale. Rev. E. E., 77. 
Hall, Rev. Thomas C, D. D., 86, 279. 
Hall, Rev. John, D. D., 249, 279. 
Halsev, Rev. A. W., 146. 
Hamiil, Charles D., 75, 81; funeral, 

137; 223. 
Hamiil, Mrs. Charles D., funeral, 170; 

223. 
Hamiil, Ernest A., 81, 132, 260, 267, 

282, 285. 
Hamiil, Dr. R. C, 38, 56; funeral, 81. 
Hamiil, T. W., 81. 
Hanson, Mrs. Burton, 158. 
Hardin, Rev. M. D., D. D., 167, 178. 
Harper, Rev. W. R., D. D., 95. 
Hartley, Rev. R. N., D. D.,'113, 128. 
Harsha, Dr. \V. M., 285. 
Haskell, Frederick T., 297. 
Haskell, Mrs. C. E., 257. 
Hawes, Rev. Joel, D. D., 25, 217, 

233. 
Hazelton, G. H., 39. 
Heath, Charles A., 285, 289. 
Henderson, C. M., 31, 75; funeral, 

100; 305. 
Henderson, C. N., 31, 36. 
Henson, Rev. P. S., D. D., 76. 
Herrick, Rev. S. E., D. D., 255. 
Hill, Rev. E. P., D. D., 157, 172, 

175, 199. 



Hine, Mrs. L. A., 131. 

Hinton, Rev. J. T., 26, 27. 

Hoard, Mrs. Margarette C, 14, 295. 

Hollingsworth, James, 45, 295. 

Horton, Rev. J. F., D. D., 173. 

Howe, Samuel, 31. 

Hudson, Miss Alice B. (Mrs. W. C. 
Covert), 292. 

Hughitt, Marvin, 75, 297. 

Humphrey, Rev. Edward, 25. 

Humphrey, H. M., 75. 

Humphrey, Rev. Heman, D. D., me- 
morial tablet at Pittsfield, Mass., 
243. 

Humphrey, Rev. Z. M., D. D., 13; 
installation and resignation, 40, 
69, 71; funeral, 72; memorial win- 
dow, 92; 160, 241; life, 243; 249. 

Humphrey, Mrs. Harriette L-, fu- 
neral, 182; 244. 

Hunter, Rev. Pleasant, D. D., 117. 

Hurlbut, Henry H., 21 

IlUnois Hotel Co., 24. 

Immanuel Baptist Church, 60, 85, 94, 
151, 164. 

Ingraham, G. S., 55. 

Irwin, D. W., 75; funeral 93. 

Irwin, Rev. \V. Francis, 133. 

Janney, J. \V., 285, 286, 300. 

Jamison, Louis T., 26. 

Jenkins, Ebenezer, 43, 44. 

Jenkins, Mrs. John E., 123, 180, 188. 

Jenkins, Thomas R., 296. 

Jenkins, Rev. H. D., D. D., 44. 

Jenks, John G., 163. 

Jenks, Mrs. \V. B., funeral, 163. 

Jennings, Rev. W. B., D. D., 105. 

Jessup, Rev. Dr., 94. 

Johnson, Rev. S. M., 94, 298. 

Johnson, Rev. Herrick, D. D., 79, 
81, 88, 90, 94, 128, 249, 261, 307. 

Jones, Daniel A., 45; funeral, 80. 

Jones, Mrs. Daniel A., 45; funeral, 
138, 139; 284, 297, 300. 

Jones, Fernando, 101, 150. 

Kelley, A. P., death, 91; memorial 
tablet, 113. 

Kelley, Mrs. A. P., death, 117. 

Kellev, William E., funeral, 178. 

Kelley, Mrs. W. E., lecture, 144. 

Kent,' Rev. Brainerd, 304. 

Kimball, Edward ("debt raiser"), 
255. 

Kimball Prof. A. S., 259. 

Kirk, Rev. E. X., 25. 

Kittredge, Rev. A. E., D. D., 72, 76. 

Knox College, 37, 239, 240, 256. 

Knox, John, celebration (1905), 141. 



314 



INDEX 



Kumler, Rev. J. P. E., 74. _ 

Koehring, Hugo (sexton), 276. 

Laflin, Matthew, funeral, 104. 

Laflin, George H., death, 135. 

Laflin, Mrs. George H., funeral, 122. 

Lake Mohonk, 142. 

Lansing, Rev. Derrick, D. D., 25. 

La Salle, Sieur de, 18. 

Laverty, Rev. L. F., 108. 

Lee, Rev. E. Trumbull, D. D., 117. 

Leiter, Levi Z., 295. 

Lind, Sylvester, 30, 31. 

Lippincott, Rev. C. A., 106, 116. 

London, England, 130. 

Lord, Rev. Daniel, D. D., 13; accepts 

call to Calvary Church, 51; death, 

52; 55, 56, 232. 
Lorimer, Rev. George C, D. D., 73. 
Ludlam, Dr. Reuben and Mrs., 38. 
Mackinac, 20, 228. 
Main Street Presbyterian Church, 

Peoria, 25. 
Magoun, Rev. G. F., 32, 33. 
Maher, Hugh, 31. 
Manson, Rev. A. C, 163. 
Marquette, "Father," 18. 
Marquis, Rev. D. C, D. D., 79, 90, 

113. 
Marsh, Sylvester, 30, 31. 
Marshall, Rev. A. B., 163, 189. 
Marshall, Rev. Thomas, D. D., 127. 
Mason, E. G. ("Chicago and Early 

Illinois"), 22, 294. 
Mather, J. M., 38. 
May, Frank E., funeral, 181. 
McAfee, Rev. C. B., D. D., 134, 279. 
McCalla, Rev. Albert, Ph. D., 156, 

245, 298, 299, 300. 
McCaughan, Rev. W. J., begins min- 
istry (Third Church), 109; 134; 

resignation, 156; 265. 
McClure, Rev. J. G. K., D. D., 100, 

127, 135, 148, 152, 157, 172, 182, 

183, 261. 
McClure, Rev. J. G. K., Jr., 168. 
McCoy, Rev. Ira, 23. 
McLean, Rev. W., 26. 
McLennan, Rev. W. G., D. D., 115. 
McPherson, Rev. S. J., D. D., be- 
gins ministry (Second Church), 74; 

75, 78, 83, 86, 103; resignation, 

113; 261. 
McWilliams, Rev. D. A., 105, 106. 
Meeker, Joseph, built first meeting 

house, 23; one of the founders of 

Calvary Church, 43; librarian, 

Sunday-school, 294. 



Memorial service for former Minis- 
ters, 135, 136. 

Merrill, Rev. W. P., D. D., 167, 197, 
204. 

Milburn, Rev. J. A., 164. 

Mitchell, Rev. Arthur, D. D., 13, 20, 
24, 27; accepts call to First Church 
and installation 40; accepts call to 
Cleveland, Ohio, and last service, 
69; 88; death, 91; memorial win- 
dow, 96; life, 247; 304. 

Mitchell, Miss Juha P., 251. 

Miter, Rev. J. J., 26, 27. 

Mole, Miss Sarah E. (Mrs. John H. 
Barrows), 254. 

Momery, Rev. Dr., 92. 

Montgomery, Rev. H., 71. 

Moody, D. L., 81. 

Moore, Hon. S. M., 56. 

Morison, Rev. John A., D. D., call 
extended, 132; acceptance, 132; 
first service, 133; installation, 134; 
Diamond Jubilee, 164, 166: resig- 
nation and last service, 179; 196, 
202; life, 265; 274, 284. 

Morrill, F. F., 84. 

Morris, Seymour, 193. 

Morton, Rev. C. M., 78, 90, 91, 93; 
last service at Railroad Chapel, 
94; 103, 156, 167, 304. 

Munger, H. H., 200, 263, 285, 301. 

Murison, Alexander, 66, 189. 

Murison, Mrs. Alexander, funeral, 
189. 

Murison, George W., 189, 297, 299. 

Myrick, W. F., 45, 101, 102. 

Myrick, Mrs. W. F., 45; funeral, 101. 

Nashville Colored Singers, 77. 

Neeley, Miss C. B., 158. 

Nelson, C. B., 30, 31, 36, 75; funeral, 
79; 216, 295. 

Newcomb, Rev. E. B., 121, 157. 

Nichol, Miss Clara J. (Mrs. John A. 
Morison), 266. 

Noble, Rev. Dr., 127, 262. 

Nollen, Rev. John S., Ph. D., 175. 

Norton, C. A., 39. 

Norton, Hon. J. O., 55, 56. 

Notman, Rev. W. R., D. D., 134, 
168, 274. 

Noyes, Rev. George C, D. D., 65. 

Ohvet Presbyterian Church, 43, 54. 

Ostrander, Rev. L. A., 94. 

Otis, Charles T., 46, 131, 200, 298. 

Otis, Frederick R., 46; funeral, 131. 

Otis, Mrs. Frederick R., 46, 131; fu- 
neral and memorial service, 154. 



INDEX 



315 



Otis, James, 43, 44, 55, 5G; funeral, 

97; 24'J, 250, 255, 297. 
Otis, James (son of Mr. and Mrs. R. 

C. Otis), 120. 
Otis, Joseph E., funeral, 123; 188. 
Otis, Mrs. Joseph E., 123; funeral, 

180; 188, 297, 299. 
Otis, Joseph E., Jr., 123, 188. 
Otis, Lucius B., 133. 
Otis, Lucius J., 131, 284. 
Otis, Miss M. E., 131, 200, 28G. 
Otis, Ralph C, 123, 188. 
Otis, Miss Pauline L., funeral, 103. 
Otis, Philo A., 46, 98, 132, 147, 175, 

267, 280, 285. 
Otis, Mrs. Philo A., 177. 
Otis, Dr. Walter J., 98. 
Odell, Rev., 135. 
Packard, Edward A., 114. 
Page, Rev. W. N., D. D., 113, 117. 
Palmer, Rev. S. C, D. D., 108. 
Patterson, Rev. R. W., D. D., 34, 

35, 40, 69, 76; death, 94; 223, 245. 
Patterson, Rev. Alexander, 130. 
Patterson, Rev. James A., D. D., 

174. 
Patton, Rev. Francis L., D. D., 

(Swing trial), 64; 68. 
Pearsons, Dr. D. K., 75; death, 194; 

253. 
Pearsons, Hiram, 26. 
Peck, P. F. \V., store, 29; purchase 

of "Brick Church," 30, 31. 
Penfield, Henrv D., 296. 
Ferine, Josiah W., 301, 304, 305. 
Perkins, George W., 38, 305. 
Pierson, S. H., 38, 39. 
Pierce, Rev. E. A. (Calvary Church), 

installation, 50; death, 50; 246. 
Plymouth Congregational Church, 

organization, 35; 54, 76, 85, 94, 

95, 115, 150, 164. 
Platner, Rev. John W., D. D., 197. 
Porter, Rev. Jeremiah, D. D., 16; 

arrival at Fort Dearborn, 20; first 

service, 20; marriage, 23; 25, 202; 

life, 228, 233, 294. 
Porter, Miss Sarah, 244. 
Porter, Noah, 244. 
Post, Miss Harriett E., marriage to 

Dr. Mitchell, 247. 
Price, Rev. P. B., 247. 
Pratt, N. D., 166, 305. 
Presbyterian Hospital, 147, 188, 264, 

269, 292. 
Presbyterian Social Union, banquet, 

175. 



Railroad Mission, 40, 69, 71, 81, 85, 
88, 91, 100. 141; Fiftieth Anni- 
versary, 156; 166, 173, 282; his- 
tory, 304, 306. 

Rannev, O. D., 56; death, 94. 

Rav, Rev. C. E., D. D., 79, 88, 93, 
101, 102, 106. 

Raymond, B. W., 28, 234. 

Reception Committee (1908), Mr. 
Earle C. Greenman, Chairman, 
160. 

Reynolds, Rev. C. G., 173. 

Risser, Miss Elizabeth, 177. 

Robinson, Rev. George L., Ph. D., 
135. 

Robbins, E. V., 41. 

Robbins, Mrs. E. V., 60. 

Rosati, Bishop of St. Louis, Mo., 21. 

Russell, Rev. James, 141, 142. 

Ryder, Rev. W. H., D. D. (Ryder 
Fund), 268. 

Saltonstall, Mrs. Wm., 14. 

Sage, Mrs. W. G., 131, 143, 184, 300. 

Sanger, Miss Sarah E., 58. 

Sawyer, Prof. A. J., 46. 

Scott, General, 19. 

Scovel, Rev. Svlvester, D. D., 108. 

Scudder, Rev. H. M., D. D., 76. 

Second Presbyterian Church, or- 
ganization, 35; 66; Twenty-fifth 
Anniversary, 40; Fiftieth Anni- 
versarv, 90; 115; fire, 116; 117, 
135, 166, 172. 

Seelye, Henry E., 14, 38, 50, 294, 
295. 

Seymour, Prof. Thomas D., 84, 212, 
214. 

Shaw, Rev. John B., D. D., begins 
ministry (Second Presbyterian 
Church), 135; 167, 180, 196. 

Shaw, Mrs. Howard V., 182. 

Shedd, Miss Catherine D., 196. 

Sherwood, H.M., 75; funeral, 125; 194. 

Shufeldt, Mrs. Mary K., 113. 

Simpson, Rev. Dr., 67. 

Smith, Bvron L.. 69, 75, 285. 

Smith, Dr. Charles G.,funeral.93: 101. 

Smith, Mrs. Charles G., funeral, 101. 

Smith, Joseph W., 38; death, 39; 41, 
295. 

Smith, Rev. S. S., 38. 

Smith, Solomon A,, funeral, 68. 

Smith, WilHam S., 200, 289, 299. 

Spencer, F. F., 75, 168. 

Spencer memorial window, 90. 

Starbuck, Mrs. Sidney, 286. 

Starkweather, Mrs. C. H., 46; funeral, 
82, 83. 



316 



INDEX 



Starkweather, Otis, funeral, 83. 

Stearns, J. K., funeral, 132; 305. 

Stevenson, Prof. J. Ross, 102. 

Stirling, W. R., 167; lecture, 192. 

St. James' Episcopal Church, 66, 215; 
organization, 229. 

St. Mary's Chapel, erection, 21. 

St. Cyr, Father St. Jean, First Mass, 
21. 

Stone, Rev. John T., D. D., instal- 
lation (Fourth Church), 172; 274. 

Strong, Rev. Josiah, D. D., 111,214 

Swazey, Rev. Arthur, D. D., 279. 

Swett, Leonard, 40,. 

Swift, W. H., 75, 126; resignation 
as Trustee, 143; 262, 282, 297. 

Swing, Rev. David, trial, 63, 64, 65. 

Sykes, Miss Harriette L., marriage 
to Dr. Humphrey, 244. 

Talmage, Rev. T. D., D. D., 91. 

Taylor, Rev. Dr., 67. 

Taylor, Mrs. Emily A., 51. 

Taylor, Deodat, 21. 

Taylor, W. H., 26. 

Temple, Dr. John T., 27. 

Terry, Prof. Benjamin S., 130, 131, 
132, 141, 180. 

The Chicago Orchestra (Thomas), 
(The Chicago Symphony), 67, 106, 
112, 115, 137, 159, 160, 162, 172, 
202, 204, 205. 

Third Presbyterian Church (Chi- 
cago), 32, 36, 76, 109, 140, 156, 
216. 

Third Presbyterian Church (Rich- 
mond, Va.), 157. 

Thomas, B. W., 46. 

Thomas, Prof. M. B., 103, 105, 129. 

Thomas, Theodore, memorial serv- 
ice, 137; 223. 
Thomas, Mrs. Theodore, reads paper 

at Fort Dearborn Guild, 147. 
Thompson, H. M., 52. 
Thompson, Rev. C. L., D. D., 200 

279. 
Thwing, Rev. C. F., D. D., 255. 



Tiffany Company, N. Y., 90, 92 96 

Tomlins, W. L-, 75, 255, 256. 

Trinity M. E. Church, 52, 53, 76, 85 
94, 115, 151, 164. 

Trowbridge, Rev. J. H. (Calvary 
Church), installation, 49; resig- 
nation and death, 50; 58. 

Tuttle, Rev. Joseph F., D. D., 241. 

Underwood, Rev. H. G., 161 

Walker, Mr., 30, 36. 

Walker, Rev., 32. 

Walker ("Father"), Rev. Tesse 20 
21, 22, 294. 

Watt, Rev. John C, D. D., 108 

Wells, E. S., 37, 38, 40, 115, 241, 
296. 

Wells, Raymond C, funeral, 163 

Wells, Bradford, 285, 299. 

Wells, Miss Mary E., 300. 

Wells, Moses D., funeral, 182. 

Wells, Robert M., 163. 

Wentworth, Hon. John, 150, 233. 

Wherry, Rev. E. M., 153. 

Wheelock, O. L., 36. 

Whistler, Captain John, 18. 

Whistler, James McNeill, 18. 

Whitehead, Jesse, funeral, 73. 

Whitehead, Ehsha P., funeral, 151. 

Whitehead, Mrs. R. M., funeral, 87. 

Whitman, Rev. Marcus, 97. 

Wight, Rev. J. A., 43. 

W'ilbor, Philo A., funeral, 83; 296, 
297. 

Wilcox, Major, 20, 209. 

Willard, Miss (Temperance), 74. 

Willard, Miss Frances L., 233. 

Wilson, H. T., 38. 

Wooley, Miss E. K., 128. 

Wood, Rev. Charles, 172. 

Wood, Henry, 46, 53, 55. 

Wilson, Thomas E., 289. 

Withrow, Rev. J. L., D. D., 255. 

Worrall, Rev. J. M., D. D., 72 

World's Fair (1893), 92. 
Young, Caryl, 127; funeral, 155. 
Zante, Archbishop of, 92. 



INDEX 



317 



THE CHOIR— REGULAR AND ASSISTING MEMBERS 
1871-1912 

The names of those who have occasionally assisted in the Christmas, 
Easter and other important festivals are duly noted in the Choir Journals. 



Sopranos (regular) : 

Aiken, Miss Fannie, 85, 8G, 87. 

Aikman, Miss Helen E., 103. 

Aldrich, Mrs. W. H. (Miss Mae 
French), 00, 62, 65, 70, 72. 

Brewster, Miss, 66. 

Buckbee, Mrs. John C, 66, 75. 

Butler, Miss Esther, 66, 75, 82, 83, 
85. 

Crocker, Miss, 66. 

Davis, Miss Carrie, SO. 

Gifford, Miss Electa, first service, 
87; last service, 102. 

Gurler, Miss L. M., 103. 

Haskell, Miss Jessica, 65. 

Schmahl, Mrs. John, 65. 

Thomas, Mrs. F. A., 65. 

Trimble, Mrs. Clara G. first serv- 
ice, 103; last service, 202, 203, 
205. 

Whitney, Miss Fanny (Mrs. E. F. 
Gorton), 66. 

Sopranos (assisting) : 

Anderson, Miss Grace, 139. 

Boedisch, Miss Piralda, 163. 

Chamberlin, Miss Mabel J., first 
service, 170; last service, 202. 

Delafontaine, Mrs. C, 151. 

Dudley, Miss Grace E., first serv- 
ice, 104; last service, 128. 

Farwell, Mrs. J. A., 62, 72, 89, 93. 

Fox, Mrs. O. L., 62. 

Haughey, Mrs. P., 151. 

Henderson, Miss F. H., 82, 85. 

Jenks, Miss Jessica, first service, 
70; last service, 106; 163. 

Jones, Miss Martha, ISO, 195. 

Kennicott, Miss Grace, 138. 

Ledward, Mrs. R. C, 196. 

Leech, Miss Amy (Mrs. Northrup), 
first service, 143; last, 178. 

Lenox, Mrs. L. R., 193, 202. 

Randall, Miss Lillian E., first serv- 
ice, 87; last service, 104. 

Rice, Miss Claribelle, first serv- 
ice, 190; last service, 202. 

Sheffield, Mrs. A. M., 173. 

Sorensen, Mrs. F. E., 189, 190, 191. 

Stevenson, Miss Margaret, 183. 

Switzer, Miss Eleanor, 168, 179. 

Tewksbury, Mrs, L. S., 144, 168. 



Sopranos (assisting) — Continued: 
Thomson, Miss M. P., 134. 
Wallace, Miss Kittie, 72. 
Williams, Mrs. Clifford. 69. 
Wilson, Mrs. Genevieve C, 104. 

Altos (regular): 

Bracken, Mrs. W. S., first service, 

135; 202, 203, 205. 
Custer, Mrs. J. R., (Miss Ella 

White), 65, 70. 
Dreier, Mrs. Christine N., first 

service, 80; last, 133, 134. 
Fisk, Mrs. Katharine, 86, 87, 88. 
French, Miss A., 61, 62, 65 
Hall, Miss Helen, 134. 
Hawkes, Miss, 60. 
Johnson, Mrs. O. K., 60, 61, 65, 89, 

210. 
Maxon, Mrs. Sarah S., 131, 134 

135, 139. 
Remmer, Mrs. Oscar, 100. 

Altos (assisting) : 

Ames, Miss Germaine H., 119, 120. 
Ames, Mrs. James C, first service, 

157; last service, 202, 206. 
Bagg, Mrs. F. S., 72. 
Balfour, Mrs. J. A., 62, 70. 
Barrows, Mrs. Helen G., 188. 
Bilton, Miss Rose, first service, 

87; last service, 103. 
Blish, Miss Louise, 106, 134. 
Elhcksen, Miss C, 172, 174, 176. 
Giles, Miss Margaret, 183. 
Hall, Miss Ethel, 191, 193. 
Heimbeck, Miss Hazel, 179, 189, 

191. 
Kempton, Mrs. J. T., 67, 68, 70, 

76. 
Lee, Miss Lucinda B., 101, 102. 

103. 
Levin, Miss Etta C, 116, 12Q, 122. 
Libbe, Mrs. Francis C, 187. 
Millar, Miss Anna, 94, 106. 
Phoenix, Miss May, 76. 
Rommeiss, Miss Pauline, 72. 
Rommeiss, Miss Emma (Mrs. 

Campbell), 138, 147, 149, 150, 

151. 
Sabin, Mrs. A. R., 62. 
Summy, Mrs. C. F., 72. 



318 



INDEX 



Altos {assisting)— Continued: 

Sutherland, Mrs. lone^ 176 179^ 
Thacker, Mrs. Annie R., 144, IbS. 
UUmann, Mrs. F., 66. 
Upton, Mrs. Geo. P., 66. 
Votaw, Miss L., 193, 199, 202. 
White, Miss M. M., 106. 

Tenors (regular): 

Abercrombie, Charles, 82. 
Coffin, Frank M., 120. 
Duggan, David D., 173, 1/6, 1»1. 
Gill, James, 61, 63. ,„^ , , 

Hall, Glenn, first service, 107; last 

126; 127, 132. 
Hickman, Adair, 163. 
Hine, Wm. S., first service, 101; 

last, 107. 
Kellogg, Howard D., 168. 
Knorr, Karl W., 123, 126, 127. 
Mendsen, Thomas M., 133. 
Miller, John B., first service, 120; 

181; last, 202, 203, 205. 
Otis, Philo A., first service, 60; 

last, 79. 
RoUo, Alfred, 110. 
Root, Frank K., first service, 83; 

last, 101; 105. . _^ 

Shaw, Alfred D., first service, 127; 

last, 162. 
Sterrett, R. M., 79, 80. 
Walker, Edward J., 162, 163, 188. 

Tenors (assisting) : 

Barnes, Dr. Charles T., 72. 
Brewster, Geo. A., 134. 
Chambers, W. H., 199, 202. 
Clark, Charles H., 77. 
CUppinger, D. A., 83. 
Fish, L., 66. 
Griffith, M. B., 187. 
Hamlin, George, 93. 
Hancox, A. H., 178. 
Hobbs, G. M., 138, 139, 141. 
Howard, R. T., 62, 72. 
Johnson, Frank T., 147, 149, 153, 

156. 
Knorr, Charles A., 76. 
Lagen, Marc, 76. 
Mix, H. A., 112, 144, 168. 
Munsen, Edward, 191, 193, 202. 
Ogden, C. H., first service, 157; 

last service, 202. 
Otis, Philo A., first service, 82; 

last service, 115; 196. 
Ross, W. B., 196. 
Russell, F. S., 143, 140. 
Sabin, A. R., 02. 
Smith, Charles M., 66, 70, 73. 



Tenors (assisting) — Continued: 
Swift, James, 108. 
Wessels, F. J., first service, 104; 

last, 124. 
Williams, Curtis, 176. 

Basses (regular) : 

Allen, E. A., first service, 88; last 

service, 107. 
Beresford, Arthur, 86, 87, 144. 
Beard, William, first service, 106; 

last service, 172. 
Cowles, E. C, 80, 81, 82, 83. 
De Riemer, Albert E., 129, 134, 

163, 197. 
Dykstra, E. J., 160. 
Erickson, Oscar G., first service, 

184; last service, 202, 203, 205. 
Evarts, E. S., 60, 61. 
Goldsmith, A. L., 61, 62, 72. 
Green, Marion, first service, 132; 

last service, 184. 
Greenleaf, C. H., 83. 
Hubbard, John M., 62; first serv- 
ice, 65; last service, 80; 89, 97. 
lott, Geo. H., 85, 86. 
Legler, E. P., 173, 174, 178. 
Murray, James, 57. 
Preisch, Frank A., 172, 173, 184. 
Root, Charles T., 65. 
WilUams, Alfred, first service, 107; 

last service, 129. 
Worthington, J. M., 134, 141, 146. 

Basses (assisting) : 

Atkinson, Charles T., first service, 

96; last service, 202, 206. 
Atkinson, F. H., Jr., first service, 

99; last service, 115. 
Bliss, P. P. (precentor), 65. 
Borroff, Albert, 163, 196, 197. 
Carleton, W. T., 68, 78. 
Carpenter, John S., 87; death, 89. 
Clark, Frank King, 105. 
Eddy, A. D., 85. 
Goodwillie, Thomas G., 55. 
Holmes, D., 66. 
Holmquist, Gustave R., 164. 
Lee, Charles S. , first service, 72 ; last 
101 ; death and memorial service, 
105; 305. 
Rose, Norman R., 189, 191. 
Scott, A. T., 99, 100, 110, 111, 113. 
Sloan, H. L., 72. 
Smith, Graham, 159, 160 . 
Sprague, William, 62, 72, 76. 
Pearson, Frank, S3, 88, 90, 91, 114. 
Plasman, John B., 199, 202. 



INDEX 



319 



Basses (assisting) — Continued: 

Merriam, David, 202. 

Noble, Charles, 06. 

Tufts, Ben. Q., 178. 

Willett, W. A., 127, 128. 
Lyric Choral Club: 

First service, 136; last service, 102. 
Organists (regular) : 

Bacon, George F., 59; death, 61. 

Cutler, W. H., 03. 

Eddy, Clarence, 00; first service, 
08; last service, 90; 102, 118, 
205, 218, 256. 

Fuller, Henry, 61, 62. 

Havens, C. A., 65, 66. 

Irwin, Charles D., 14; first serv- 
ice, 71; last service, 101; 108, 
125, 130, 305. 

Liebling, Emil, 63. 

Moore, Francis S., first service, 
101; 202, 205, 297. 

Owen, B. B., 63. 

Root, F. W., 00. 
Organists (assisting) : 

Dunham, Arthur, 103. 

Dyer, Mr., 00. 

Eddy, M. H., 173. 

Flagler, I. V., 62. 

Haines, Miss Tina M., 117. 

Henderson, L. J., 74. 

Hoyt, Louis P., 79. 

Knopfel, G. C, 62. 

Laukart, Miss May D., 180. 

McCarrell, A. F., 71, 78, 221. 

Middelschulte, W., 88, 151, 160. 

Moore, S. C, 00. 

Pratt, Miss Mary P., 172. 

West, John A., 93. 

Wild, H. M., 69 
Visiting organists — (World's Fair, 

1893): 

Carl, WilUam C, 92. 

Guilmant, Alexander, 92, 206. 

Whitney, S. B.. 92. 

Woodman, R. H., 92. 
Violins: 

Bar^, Emil, 112. 

Dimond, Harry, 91. » 

Carpenter, Miss Marian, 109, 110. 

Kramer, Leopold, 106. 

Krauss, Alexander, first service, 
116; last service, 202, 203. 

Lutz, Milton G., 123. 

Marx, Leon, 115. 

Nurnberger, Luther, 202. 

Remenyi, Edouard, 90, 91. 

Rosenbecker, A., 87, 88, 91, 95. 



Violins — Continued: 
Sir, Mr., 62. 
Schniitt. E., 90. 
Schulze, Walter, 128. 
Seidel, Richard, first service, 165; 

last service, 202. 
Spiering, Theodore, 91. 
Stock, Frederick A., 137, 140, 143, 

147, 152, 155, 159, 162. 
Zukowsky, Alexander, 202. 
Violas: 

Dasch, George, first service, 105; 

last service, 202. 
Esser, Franz, first service, lOoi 

last service, 202. 
Violoncellos: 

Bachman, Mr., 02. 

Brueckner, Carl, 182. 

Herner, Julius, 128. 

Hess, Hans, 191, 192, 195, 199. 

Schoessling, Paul, 142, 171, 172, 

179. 
Steindel, Bruno, first service, 100; 

last service, 202, 203. 

Double basses: 

Beckel, Joseph, first service, 133; 

last service, 159. 
Jiskra, V., first service, 180; last 

service, 202. 
Klemm, Louis, first service, 137; 

last service, 170. 
Parbs, Hans, first service, 101; 

last service, 202. 

Harp: 

Bichl, Mrs. E. W., first service, 

124; last service, 133. 
Chatterton, Mme. Josephine, 87. 
Dingley, Miss Blanche, 95. 
Lyon, George W., 02. 
Timmons, Miss Lee, 96. 
Tramonti, Enrico, first service, 

137; last service, 202, 203. 
Wunderle. Mrs. M., 119. 

Flute: 

Bareither, Mr., 62. 

Leake, Gen. Joseph B., 60. 

Quensel, Alfred, first service, 122; 
last service, 202. 

Timmons, E. S., 88, 91, 96. 

Weisenbach, H., 128. 
Oboe and English horn: 

Barthel, Alfred, first service, 151; 
last service, 202. 

Cornet: 

Quinn, John, 88, 300. 



320 



INDEX 



French horn: 

de Mar6, Leopold, first service, 
122; last service, 202. 

Fischer, Joseph, 128. 

Pottag, Max, 202. 
Kettle-drums: 

Zettelmann, Joseph, first service, 
155; last service, 202, 203. 
Piano: 

Manierre, Miss Eva, 62, 63. 

Ledochowski, N., 62. 

Peterson, Miss Edna, 147. 

Seeboeck, W. C. E., 90. 
Choirmaster, Philo Adams Otis, 1900- 

1912. 
A Chapter on Choirs: 

Adams, J. W., 224, 225. 

Balatka, Hans, 220, 224. 

Cleaver, Edward C, 14, 210. 

Corey, N. J., 214. 

O'Neale, Thomas P. (letter), 214. 

Peck, A. R., 208. 

Sieghng, Henry (letter), 214. 

Upton, George, P., 223. 
Early singers in Chicago: 

Bostwick, Mrs. Emma G., 222. 

Boyden, Miss Ehzabeth, 222. 

Davis, George, 222, 224. 

Downs, Augustus G., 209, 225. 

Dunham, Dr. R. N., 210. 

Farrell Miss Lizzie, 223, 224. 

Fassett, Mr. and Mrs. S. M., 210, 
222, 224, 225. 

GoodwilUe, Thomas G., 217, 224. 

Heinrichs, Miss, 217. 

Jewett, J. T., 222. 

Johnson, Henry, 221. 

Larrabee, C. R., 14, 215. 

Lumbard, Frank, 224. 

Lumbard, J. G., 222. 

Matteson, Mrs. "Cassie," 221, 222. 

Miller, Mrs. Hattie B., 220. 

Rickey, J. R., 225. 

Schultze, Edward, 217, 224. 

Seaverns, C. H., 221. 

Thomas, Mrs. F. A., 221, 223. 

Van Wordragen, Miss Kate, 217. 

Warner, S. P., 209. 
Composers: 

Danks, H. P., 226. 

Gleason, Frederic G., 71, 217. 

Greatorex, Rev. Edward, 213. 

Greatorex, Henry W., 212, 213, 
214, 217. 

Wilson, Henry, 218. 
First Presbyterian Church: 

First quartette introduced, 2 11,222. 



First Presbyterian Chnrch-Continued 

Choir leaders prior to 1857, 225, 
226. 

Choir members (1860-1871), 224. 

Choir members prior to 1857 (sur- 
viving), 226. 

Other members, 226, 227. 
Organists prior to 1871: 

Cawthorne, Nicholas, 225. 

Dohn, A. W., 81, 137, 219, 222, 
223. 

Baird, Frank T., 217, 225. 

Bird, Horace G., 103, 223, 224, 
225. 

Falk, Dr. Louis, 225. 

Oilman, Dr. J. E., 225. 
Early organists in Chicago: 

Ansorge, Charles, 219. 

Baumbach, Adolph, 219. 

Buck, Dudley, 214, 216, 218. 

Chant, H. W., 220. 

Conkey, Miss Nellie (Mrs. Crosby), 
226. 

Crouch, Thomas, 220. 

Currie, W. H., 37, 219. 

Havens, Charles A., 221. 

Hood, D. N., 66, 221. 

Knopfel, G. C, 219, 220. 

Payne, E. A., 222. 

Payne, Theodore S., 222. 

Rein, Emil, 221. 

TiUinghast, Miss Sarah, 219. 
Organs: 

Church of the Epiphany, 217. 

First Congregational, 216. 

First Presbyterian, 218. 

First Unitarian, 216. 

Fourth Presbyterian, 216. 

New England Congregational, 218. 

Second Presbyterian, 216. 

St. James' Episcopal, 217. 

St. Mary's Catholic, 216. 

St. Paul's Universahst, 216. 

Third Presbyterian, 216 . 

Unity Church, 218, 223. 

Wabash Avenue M. E., 216. 
Organ builders: 

Andrews & Son, 14, 216. 

Erben, Henry, 215. 

Farrand & Votey, 217. 

Hall & Labagh, 37, 216, 217, 218. 

Hook, E. & G. G., 218. 

Hook & Hastings, 61. 

Jardine & Son, 14, 216. 

Johnson, W. A., 14, 216. 

Johnson & Son (Emmons, How- 
ard Organ Co.), 216. 

Pilchers' Sons, Henry, 220. 



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